Latest Comments by Cheryl Louise

Latest Comments by Cheryl Louise

Cheryl Louise 921 Views

Joined Sep 18, '12. Posts: 13 (38% Liked) Likes: 6

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  • 0

    US national nursing organizations are endorsing a joint statement supporting the Associate Degree of Nursing as an entry level of nursing along with the Baccalaureate Degree of Nursing due to the push for making the Baccalaureate degree the entry level. This endorsement includes a seamless transition to an advanced degree if the nurse wishes to do so.

    The "BSN in 2010" initiative did not occur as there are more Associate Degree Nurses than Baccalaureate Degree Nursing. Community colleges and Associate Degree Nursing Organizations are pushing to maintain the Associate degree as an entry level of nursing. There has been much research on the need for all levels of nursing due to a projected nursing shortage within the next 10 -15 years due to retirement of the largest age group of nurses. The push for "Magnet Hospital" designation requires only Baccalaureate Nurses be hired which is restricting job placement for Associate Degree Nurses.

    Have any Associate Degree Nurses have difficulty finding jobs due to the BSN push for entry level and "Magnet Hospitals'?

  • 0

    I recently heard a program on the Medical Maternity Wards for pregnant Chinese women in the US. Large homes in Western US are changed into many bedrooms being used for maternity wards. Pregnant Chinese women come to the US in later terms for pregnancy to deliver their children in the US so the children will be US citizens. They star for the delivery and for two months after delivery for recovery and to obtain Social Security cards for thier children. The reason for doing this is to have their children return to the US to attend college free as college is very competitive in China and difficult to get accepted. Has anyone else heard of this?

  • 1
    natnat122 likes this.

    All that apply questions are great indictors of the ability to critically think. Get used to them as you will see many on the NCLEX. Practice, practice, practice!!!

  • 0

    With the push for active learning all faculty need to learn active strategies. Here are a few ideas I have learned: use case studies - introduce case study at beginning of lecture and refer to it throughout the lecture, use storytelling of your experiences with patients and ask students to add experiences they have, use group work and have 1 person designated to present the information to class, use concept map/mind mapping to write about a disease or concept on the whiteboard - include patho, treatments, nursing care, labs, meds, use jigsaws, include NCLEX style questons throughout the lecture for students to answer as a group - this can also b done with clickers it you have them, use simulations with low-and high-fidelity manakins with groups students. These are just some ideas I hope may be helpful to you.

  • 0

    I have used concept mapping and even mind mapping which is more extensive than consept mapping. The students seem to like doing them. For instance, when teaching diabetes in class, the students and I filled 2 whiteboards with important concepts, nursing interventions, treatments that are important to know about diabetes. The students enjoyed doing it as a group project and they said it helps them to look at the big picture of the disease process. I have tried to get other faculty to change from care plans to concept maps but they are very resistant to change as they have always done care plans. Students still have to know the same information as in a care plan to do a concept map but concept maps as so much easier to grade and so many trees in paperwork!!!

    I looked up information on jigsaws and found it an interesting way to teach and look forward to trying it. Thanks.

  • 1
    VickyRN likes this.

    Clinical hours are not loaded the same as classroom hours even though much more time is spent in clinical. Even clinical hours differ as the nursing instructor is with eight to ten students the entire time in the clinical setting and then has paperwork to correct each week. Other health sciences have preceptors with students and the instructor just makes rounds to see how things are going. I don't know how the loading for clinical came about but there is definitely an inequality and nursing instructors do much more work than any other instructor. Even trying to discuss this with administration has fallen on deaf ears. It is just expected that nursing instructors work harder and longer than other instructors.

  • 0

    Have you checked to see if the nearby community college have a nursing program? With nursing faculty shortages in many colleges, job openings are posted quite often. with an MSN, you can teach in a nurse aide program, LPN program, ADN program and BSN program. With your BSN, you can work as adjunct faculty and do clinicals with students to see if you really do want to teach. As lig stated, you can also teach for staff development in hospitals or health agencies. Teaching nursing is a very busy career but also very rewarding. Good luck.

  • 2

    You provide some excellent suggestions for those with disabilities. Not everyone's disability is a physical one that can be seen. I commend you for being honest and not using your disability as a crutch. Kudos for having supportive supervisors and a good end result.

  • 0

    I agree with you on your statement: It is clear that change is in the air, whether we like or agree with it :/[/QUOTE]

    Nursing is know for change but the push for BSN entry level has been going on for decades and has been unsuccessful. Right now the IOM Report and hospital "Magnet" status is pushing the current change to "BSN by 2020". We'll see who wins this battle with the next projected "nursing shortage" by then!!!

  • 0

    Hi Meriwhen,

    As far as I know, there is no plan to do away with LPN/LVNs as they are needed for long term care and in doctor's offices.

    I don't know where you practice but I have done travel nursing along the East coast from NewYork to Florida and taught in both ADN and BSN programs and most of the hospitals prefer ADN nurses over BSN as they have more clinical experience and are more prepared to work after graduation. BSN nurses take much more time to orient before they are ready to work. I am very much in support of maintaining ADN and BSN entry levels. There is a place for both.

  • 1
    Fiona59 likes this.

    Hello Mrs. Davis,

    It depends on the area of nursing you go in to as to whether you will see a lot of death or not. If you work in the ER or Oncology, it is part of the job and you will always have feelings for your patient but you learn to deal with it and what you believe in spirituality helps you to get through it. I have been a nurse for 30 + years and have had less than 10 patient deaths. I have baptized dead fetuses and newborns, held the hand of an elderly patient while dying, and prounounced a patient dead as a nurse practitioner. When possible, ou attend the funeral to put a closure to the event. Always remember, nursing has so many rewards that a death now and then hurts but you have co-workers to get you through it. Don't give up because of one incident. Talk to your instructor sor your clergy if you have one and they will give you the advice you need to help you deal with the situation.

  • 0

    US national nursing organizations are endorsing a joint statement supporting the Associate Degree of Nursing as an entry level of nursing along with the Baccalaureate Degree of Nursing due to the push for making the Baccalaureate degree the entry level. This endorsement includes a seamless transition to an advanced degree if the nurse wishes to do so.

    The "BSN in 2010" initiative did not occur as there are more Associate Degree Nurses than Baccalaureate Degree Nursing and community college and Associate Degree Nursing Organizations are pushing to maintain the Associate degree as an entry level of nursing. There has been much research on the need for all levels of nursing due to a projected nursing shortage within the next 10 -15 years due to retirement of the largest age group of nurses. The push for "Magnet Hospital" designation requires only Baccalaureate Nurses be hired which is restricting job placement for Associate Degree Nurses.

    I am interested in what the entry level is for other countries and if any other country is dealing with an entry level issue. I would appreciate any responses. Thank you.

  • 1
    Miss Lizzie likes this.

    I agree ads like that negatively portray nurses. In fact, I believe I have see this Halloween costume before. Even though the advertising company is not nursing related, they could be more objective about what they publish. This goes along with the negative images on TV programs and in soap operas. Nurses are always portrayed as sex images, not the hard workers that they are. Until nurses and nursing organizations put a ban to it, this image will prevail. I commend Johnson & Johnson for their ads promoting real nurses. I which more companies would follow suit.



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