Latest Comments by Are-En-Fla

Are-En-Fla 1,248 Views

Joined Jun 8, '12. Posts: 16 (44% Liked) Likes: 12

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  • 3
    NYCRN16, Race Mom, and AnonRNC like this.

    Wow, just WOW! I am a newer (less than a year) nurse employed at a small hospital on the tele floor (my first nursing job). All I have to say is that these stories make it clear that I don't think that I will ever leave there! Our charge nurses will only take lunch if all other nurses have taken lunch. At the end of the shift, if other nurses are still there, our charge nurse will stay and help with whatever tasks need to be done. Even our manager and PCL will jump in and help with patient care if we are short staffed or completely slammed. I count myself very fortunate!

  • 2
    Ginnym1981 and ShaynaSmart like this.

    Terrified is a very valid feeling. I am a new nurse...graduated in 12/2011, passed NCLEX 1/2012. Started working in 2/2012. One of my meetings with my educator during my first 4 weeks of orientation, she explained to me how some preceptors think that a newly licensed nurse can't do this or can't do that. She told me that that was incorrect and my license says I can do anything and everything that my state licenses me for as a RN. Yes, I have to be checked off on skills...just like nursing school. However, it is within my scope of practice. I told her, "Wow, that's really scary, my license is always on the line." She said, "Yes, you should be scared. And if you weren't scared, then that would be a problem." I think about this every day and I think it was one of the best pieces of advice I could have ever received. So, yes, you should be terrified! But don't be scared to ask questions. Use your preceptors, charge nurses, doctors (ask your nurse whom you're shadowing if certain doctors are okay to bug...they are out there!), PAs, nurse practitioners. Question EVERYTHING you do not understand!

    Oh, and I didn't know I wanted to be a nurse until the semester before I got into nursing school. I'm 42 years old and though the appeal of being in the medical field is what brought me to the decision, I had no idea what I was getting into. I am so happy and fortunate I made it through, and absolutely love what I do!

  • 0

    Awesome thread! First thing I thought of for me was the morphine vial. So glad that others have done that too! When that piece popped off the bottom, it was so loud that it scared the living daylights out of me!

    The first time I hung platelets without supervision: Used the double tubing with one going into my platelets and the other going to the bag of NS. I think I had all of the clamps open at the same time when I tried to prime the platelets tube. I think I was priming wrong to begin with! Well, my entire bag of platelets emptied into the NS bag. It looked like it was about to burst!

  • 3

    How on earth do I stay sweet and kind all of the time? My hospital has zero tolerance on "going off" on anyone, regardless of the situation. This includes patients, family, doctors, staff, ANYONE. I would have been fired immediately. That is enough motivation for me to smile, walk away from the situation, ask someone else to help, etc.

  • 1
    CruzanNurseRN likes this.

    Morton Plant Mease hospitals start CNR at $23.76 per hour. $5.00 night diff.

  • 0

    Simplistic, I, too, felt the same way about calling doctors. I still get anxiety, working on telemetry as a new grad since February. I'm finding that the more I do it, the easier it is. The more you get to know each doctor as an individual, you will know when to call, when not to call. Of course, there are certain situations that you would call no matter what. With critical lab values, we have to call within 15 minutes of receiving the value. After receiving new orders, I always ask the doc if they would like another call if the value is still critical. The doc will usually then give parameters on when to call again. If I am in doubt about when to call the doctor, I always ask my charge. It is definitely getting easier! I am learning to not take it personally when the doctor gets cranky, I am only doing my job.

  • 0

    I got a portable Pulse-Ox reader. I love it! Especially when you need to get a reading while your patient is ambulating and you need to drag the Dynamap AND hold onto the patient at the same time. It's also handy when you want to get that reading quickly without having to go find a dynamap. They run around $75-100.

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    I would eventually like to get into case management as well. I am finding that working on the floor, when seeing the case managers, I let them know what is going on with my patients. They seem to like that I have interest in what they are doing and seek me out now instead of me seeking them out. I was even offered a part time position but I don't want to take it right now since I am not even through with my 6 month orientation period! I feel that I need more patient care experience to tackle this stressful position. So, I would have to say that it is probably true that you have to shmooze with the case managers on your floor to get your foot in.

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    I didn't think about that. I will know for next time to make that suggestion. Thank you!

  • 0

    I was approached yesterday by a nun wanting to give my NPO patient a wafer (or whatever you call it...sorry). The patient was NPO for a surgery scheduled that morning so I politely said no and apologized. What would you do? I'm a new nurse.

  • 1
    orthonurse55 likes this.

    Wow, I guess I am really fortunate to work in a facility where I don't see this happening. I am a new nurse and was welcomed with open arms by just about everyone. Everyone works together as a team and I absolutely never got the "nurses eat their young" attitude. Veteran nurses always ask me if I need help as well as newer nurses. It is a small facility, our telemetry unit has 25 beds (all private rooms). If gossip is going on, it is behind closed doors outside of my earshot.

  • 0

    We also have a scanning system (which saves soooo much time!) so meds are opened at bedside. I check each med against the MAR while pulling them from the Pyxis. At bedside I scan the patient's ID bracelet asking them their name and date of birth. I then scan each med while telling them what they are getting and what it is used for. With new meds, I tell them what the side effects are as well. Before I open the meds, I ask if they have any questions. I then open all meds and put them in a cup and give to the patient however way they take them (with applesauce, one at a time, crushed, etc.).

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    I just had my first code experience a few weeks ago. I was put on the code team since I am a new nurse and have fewer patients in my assignment. Outcome was good. I considered it an out of body experience and organized confusion and I was hooked. Put me on the code team every time please! Next code a week later, I knew the outcome was going to be bad. I made it a point while waiting my turn for chest compressions to look at the patient's ID bracelet. I wanted to at least know the name and birth date. I had no emotion and considered it part of my job to try my best and walked away knowing we did everything we could. I think my emotions will be different if (when) it is my patient...

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    Just wanted to say hi. New nurse here and loving reading others' stories on being overwhelmed like me. So happy that I am not the only one! Thank you for having a great site with newbies and veterans!!!

  • 1
    j9eRN likes this.

    NCLEX-RN is such a weird test. I couldn't even remember a single item that was on it the moment I walked out of the room. I don't think there is anything anyone can do to prepare for this test as far as studying. I only used the NCLEX Success study guide that was supplied during nursing school. I did about 100 questions a day for 10 days. It did not help at all. I walked out after 75 questions and cried, thinking that I had failed. I didn't. I was only confident that I had 3 questions 100% correct. The rest...I thought I had guessed. The only thing I can think of, is that my nursing school experience helped me to narrow down the answers to the one that was the least wrong. Crazy, but it worked for me I guess. I also had about 15 'choose all that apply' questions. The worst.


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