Latest Comments by garciwarsi

garciwarsi 1,387 Views

Joined May 17, '12. Posts: 26 (15% Liked) Likes: 4

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    The fact that you are taking the time to reflect on the situation and getting advice from peers about what you can do now or might have done differently I think says a lot about you as a nurse! You want to improve so next time you can make an impact on the outcome. I think what makes it especially difficult is that the patient didn't make it, but the most important part is that you took action on the chest pain which is what you knew how to handle. This is why we work in teams. Not one person is going to know every vital piece of information during these situations. You did what you knew how to do and now you know what to expect. And also, what you can do in the future. I would suggest talking to your manager/educator and possibly getting reoriented to the code cart, how to open it in this situation and where things are. Also, maybe a mock code for the floor to practice skills?

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    Invest in some window shades to darken/block out light in your bedroom while you sleep during the day. Silence your phone while you sleep, if you can. You might also need some ear plugs or a fan to create a little "white noise" to help you sleep. I usually also take melatonin when I get home after a night shift to help me fall asleep. If you don't drink coffee or soda I wouldn't start out with an energy drink, unless its made with natural ingredients. I think the energy drinks have quite a bit of caffeine in them, so they might make you scatter brained or jittery. Maybe try green tea first? Also, stay hydrated and make sure to eat! Even if you have to just snack every couple hours. Eating a full meal might be tough, I know I got nauseous the first time I tried that.

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    I currently work at OHSU, not in one of the ICUs, but I had my senior practicum in the trauma icu last summer. There always seems to be positions available in the ICUs, typically night shift, but they are available. Right now I have seen a lot of openings in the cardiac medical ICU. The fact that you have level one experience is huge! Try Legacy Emmanuel too.

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    Portland, OR
    New grad RN BSN
    Base pay about $34/hr
    Evening shift differential $2/hr (until 11p), night shift differential $6/hr (11p-7a)
    Large teaching hospital

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    dclcnur likes this.

    Quote from dclcnur
    Thanks for the reply. May I ask what kind of position you accepted to pass up this opportunity? Sorry to intrude, if you don't feel comfortable answering here you can pm me. I'm in search of my first job after getting my license last month.
    Not an intrusion! So I graduated in Sept and passed NCLEX in October. I was applying to just about every hospital opening that I qualified for, but I didn't have much luck. I was looking to start out in critical care, but I knew it would be tough as a new grad. That's when I decided to apply to residency programs and landed a few interviews. However, mid-December I got a call to interview for a staff RN position on the trauma step-down unit at the hospital where I went to school. I had a rotation on this floor and I completed my senior practicum in the trauma ICU so I decided to go ahead with the interview. To my surprise I was offered the position a few days later. While the residency would be an amazing opportunity I did not want to pass up this job offer. The market is pretty tough out there for new grads! Plus, I really enjoyed my time on the unit and it sparked my interest in trauma in the first place.

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    I don't have any specific advice, but I wanted to say congrats! I also graduated, passed the NCLEX, and accepted a position at my #1 choice hospital recently. There are lots of great forum topics here with great tips and stories from other folks. I think what it boils down to is the first year is going to be tough! But in the end it will all be worth it! good luck to you!

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    I would make it short and sweet. I believe the thank you note should be just that, not trying to sell yourself all over again. That should have happened in the interview! Nurse managers are typically very busy people. I think the obvious, "thank you for taking the time to interview me for the RN position....blah blah blah." Then maybe a sentence about something you talked about in the interview. Maybe complimenting them on how they value teamwork or that you could really see yourself working on this unit because _______ and ________. I think it is perfectly appropriate to attach those documents to the email.

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    I don't think it is very difficult to land an interview for the residency program if you meet all of the requirements. Getting past the first round of interviews is another story. The competition is tough for the 20-40 jobs available. But it's not impossible!

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    From the paperwork we received regarding second interviews...I don't think anyone will probably start hearing anything until after this week. Second interviews are to take place between Jan 1-31 I believe. I will also be declining any further offers. I also recently accepted another position. Good luck!

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    Exactly what I did grubb! Passed in 76.

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    Hello all!
    I am a recent grad looking to get into critical care, specifically trauma ICU. I'm wondering if any of you have suggestions for a good textbook/resource for critical care nursing. Basically something that I can use to for reference material. Trauma specific would be great, but ultimately anything critical care works.

    Thank you!

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    Definitely try to get into an ICU for your senior practicum, or last clinical rotation. I would say make sure to get your ACLS certification sometime during school. Maybe on a break before your last term? It definitely won't be easy. I am trying to do the same myself. I graduated from an accelerated BSN program in Sept. A few of the students in my group landed a job in their practicum ICU's right after graduation, but I did not. Our unit didn't have any availability. However, I've stayed in contact with the nurse manager and it sounds like she may have something opening up soon. Good luck!

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    Yeah, Legacy RN Residency! What specialties are people interviewing for? Critical Care for me!

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    I don't want to say that there is only one "best" way to study for the NCLEX. Everyone learns differently so it is really important to tailor your study plan to how you best learn material.
    Personally, we were also given access to ATI material in my nursing program, but I didn't use it besides taking two required proctored exams for the program. I decided to use Kaplan's NCLEX-RN 2013-2014 Strategies Practice & Review book. I found it at my local library. I read that cover to cover and did the two 265 question practice tests that were included. Kaplan has some great strategies in that book for NCLEX-style questions.
    I decided to purchase the Hurst review. Along with the Hurst review I also purchased the Saunder's review book and utilized my patho/pharm notes from school (we had an AH-MAZING instructor that taught both).
    The Hurst review is broken down into different content areas (i.e. cardiac, psych, neuro, GI, etc). Once I finished a Hurst video I would sit down with the corresponding chapter in the Saunder's book and then my corresponding pharm/patho notes. Once I reviewed all that I moved on to the next content area until I got through all of the Hurst videos.
    I think the most important advice I can give is to do questions. I probably did over 3,000 questions in the 6 weeks I studied. It's important to understand the core content, but it is also important to understand what the question is actually asking. I think that comes with practice. I installed apps on my phone. I would do questions while waiting for class to start, on my lunch break at work, right before I went to bed at night.
    Hope this helps. Good luck!

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    jmiraRN likes this.

    I appreciate these tips. I take the exam in two days and I'm pretty nervous!


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