Latest Comments by blt99

Latest Comments by blt99

blt99 865 Views

Joined Mar 30, '12. Posts: 30 (27% Liked) Likes: 16

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    I might approach your paper from a different angle, and a little lesser degree of severity.
    I'm thinking about hospitalist physicians that trust the nursing staff enough to issue very lenient standing med orders to prevent calling them in the middle of the night for something minimal.

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    Never heard of. We were told to start looking for a part time/PRN job at a hospital (doing PCT or similar) about halfway through nursing school. Just to get a foot in the door for an RN job after graduation.

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    tsm007 likes this.

    What type of learner are you?
    I ask because I am highly kinetic and visual (on the VARK test) and the last thing I am is read/write. I can't look at black letters on a white paper and absorb it. Doesn't work for me. For me, I act stuff out or make silly body movements (think YMCA dance) or draw simple pictures that tell a story.

    One set of books I have found helpful are the "made incredibly easy!" books, and there is one for fluids and electrolytes.
    Also Mosby's memory card book for fluids and electrolytes has cute cartoony pictures. I used the ones for pharm and they helped to inspire creativity.

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    Did you just fail a couple classes? Can you retake those classes?
    If you've failed more than your allotted number of fails, our school will dismiss you. I can understand their reasoning. If you can't succeed in these classes after 2 attempts, then you're not going to succeed through the rest of the program and in getting a license.
    Like the previous person said, examine why you failed them. Why did you fail, what was your barrier, is that barrier something that you can easily overcome? If there are solid roadblocks, then I would consider not applying to other schools, that will only be more depressing.
    I'm sensing you're desperate to get into the medical field. Maybe do something that you can get a quicker certification in, rather than a lengthy BSN? Work for a while, then try again?

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    I am hearing impaired and I have the Littmann 3100. Without my hearing aids, I can barely make out heart sounds on any regular stethoscope (classic, lightweight, cardio, master, you name it), let alone any delicate vascular or breath sounds. My electronic one only amplifies the sound, but I'd be lost without it.

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    Semester 2/4:
    Adult I Med-Surg + clinical - 5 hours
    Women's health (OB) + clinical - 5 hours
    Aging - 2 hrs (online)
    Research - 2 hrs (online)
    Groups - 2 hrs (online)

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    our end of semester HESI wasn't as bad as I anticipated. 1064 - 96.3% I'll take it!

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    And (aside from the ever present UTI fear with foleys) the biggest concern is clotting and foley tube blocking.

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    I was dead nervous about having to talk to patients during my first clinicals. The best advice I was given my first semester was to just be yourself. Do what is comfortable for you, but every day challenge yourself to do one tiny new thing. Touching is a good start for me, and I'm getting more comfortable with it every day.

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    loveoverpride likes this.

    I gained weight through my pre-nursing school semesters. This is my first semester in nursing school and I've lost 15 so far.

    It's from being too poor to eat at the cafeteria, vending machines, starbucks, or fast food. Nursing school is expensive. I take my cheap, but almost no calorie coffee from home, instead of starbucks 400 calorie 87g sugar fancy drinks.
    Anorexia after being so busy on non-clinical days and on clinical days I really don't feel like eating right after cleaning up poo and being hopped up on adrenaline. I'm not one of those people that can stuff my face when I get home, it makes me sick.

    Most expensive diet, but I'll take it.

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    I see that as a tough situation. I love critters as well, but I didn't have a problem dissecting pigs. We used 1 pig per table (4 students) and used the same pig through the whole 4 week summer class, so at least we conserved while we learned. We didn't dissect anything in Micro, we just had fun growing and killing bacteria. I am thankful that we did pigs and not cats. I probably would have had a rough time. It was still a very valuable experience, and I still use that knowledge today.

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    I love happy stories like these! Great idea to start a positive thread!

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    I agree with and respect everything that has been said, but I would like to add two things that I have had to think about lately.

    1. Especially first semester nursing students on their first clinicals - we want to see things, we want to have exciting experiences, we are full of wonder and curiosity. Having to spend an hour cleaning up diarrhea while there's a code down the hall gives us a case of "I wish". A good student will reconcile this and say "there will be another opportunity for me to see that". Personally I don't mind having to do the dirty work, but that's not the whole reason I came to nursing school. I came to learn, and missing out on educational experiences to clean explosive code brown can get you down. My suggestion on this (from the preceptor or educator standpoint) is encouragement and supplemental education - I'm sorry you had to do that, thank you for doing it, now lets talk about that tarry black stool, look at that developing pressure ulcer.
    2. The second part is a touchy topic - please. Telling me in a condescending way that I have to clean up, by myself, doesn't make me any more thrilled or thankful to do it. If you ask me politely if I will help you by bathing your patient, I'm more than happy to help out. Please is still the magic word. For the past 2 weeks, on our floor, there have been no PCTs at all. There was a big difference in attitude and willingness when we as students were asked to abandon our normal patient routine and just do the PCT jobs for the day to help the nurses, than there was when we are told by random nurses on the floor that we have to give a bath to their patient. It's not always what you say, it's how you say it.

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    I would say that it depends on what city you live in. I'm in Dallas at TWU and we have many locations for clinicals. Most of the hospitals in Dallas have bus/train stops pretty close, and ours run early. In that case, yes it's possible, I have friends that do it. However, the hospitals in the non-medical-center (outside of Dallas) don't have busses or trains anywhere close and a car is pretty much essential. You can make friends very quickly to establish a carpool, or beg family/friends to drive you on those days.
    To answer your direct question - no clinicals are not flexible. You have to be there on time at 0630, and we have pre-clinical the night before.

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    Thanks for bringing this topic up. It is something that I wouldn't have thought of and I'm glad I am since I'll be interviewing this spring. I agree with everyone else about the situation and Congrats on the job!!!
    Thinking about what I would say: definitely no med errors or HIPPA violations or serious patient endangering errors or practicing outside your scope.


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