Latest Likes For DesertSky

Latest Likes For DesertSky

DesertSky, BSN, RN 1,732 Views

Joined Feb 21, '12. DesertSky is a Critical Care RN. Posts: 41 (39% Liked) Likes: 19

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • Jun 15

    I can tell you the low pay represented for Kansas is before taxes. Shockingly enough, Kansas also has some of the highest tax rates in the country.

  • Jun 15

    Quote from calivianya
    Very important question here. Not all states have income tax, but I'm not familiar enough off the top of my head to know if any of the bottom states are free of income tax. If those are before tax numbers, those could be very skewed if a nurse is trying to figure out in what states the actual compensation is the worst.
    Kansas is one of the lowest paying across numerous lists and has a relatively high rate of state income tax.

  • Jun 15

    As someone who started as a new grad with a BSN in Kansas, it is true the pay is very low. After securing a job in another state before learning my husband's job was relocating him to Kansas, it was like a punch in the stomach when I compared new grad pay in Kansas to my other job offer.

    The one thing I will mention is that due to the low pay, cold winters, and general lack of people flocking to move to Kansas, there are plenty of opportunities for new grads especially in speciality areas. It may be harder to land a job as a new grad in larger cities such as Kansas City or Wichita, but if you are willing to move to more rural areas of Kansas there are an abundance of opportunities. If you work for 2 years and take advantage of your employer paying for all of your certifications (TNCC, ACLS, PALS, etc...) you will be very marketable and will have an abundance of job offers wherever you would like to move...

  • Jun 1

    I have a question. I work FT in the ICU, however there is a PRN PACU position that opened up at my current employer. The PRN job requires 4 shifts per month and pays double what my hourly rate is in the ICU since it is PRN. I am interested in picking up the PRN position in addition to my FT ICU job. Do you think my hospital would be ok with me working both?

    Please let me know if you have had a similar situation arise and how it worked out.

    Thanks in advance!

    DesertSky

  • Jun 1

    OlivetheRN and kidsmom002:

    Thanks for the replies. It sounds like my best bet is clarifying my employer's policy on the matter and going from there. Thanks for the heads up

  • Apr 14

    I've been accepted to Nursing@Simmons FNP program for the November 2016 cohort. The program sounds great, however the two things that concern me are the cost and the required live classes. My admission rep told me classes are offered from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. ET depending on the class, but I'm just concerned about fitting them in with my work schedule....

    I'm hoping to continue working full-time for the first year until clinicals begin and then I may consider cutting back to part-time at work. How are you all financing the tuition? From my research, the max amount your can borrow in federal direct loans is $20,500/year. That leaves a big gap in Simmons tuition....

  • Apr 11

    I was wondering if anyone has attended SNHU's online MSN program? It sounds great and offers classes in advanced health assessment, patho, and pharmacology. I would like to complete a good general MSN now with the option to return to obtain my post-MSN certificate NP later.

    Any students of SNHU care to share your experience?

    Thanks

  • Mar 17

    I was recently accepted for the November 2016 cohort. I will be attending PT and plan on working FT as long as I can. I know I may have to go PT at work once clinicals start. One thing I really like about the program is the online format and that Simmons helps students with clinical placements, however I'm a little nervous about the cost of the program...

  • Mar 6

    Are you comfortable and familiar with critical drips? Many times ICU transport pt's have multiple drips, so it would be helpful to understand titration and pharmacology of pressers, sedation, etc....

  • Feb 11

    Thank you all for your wonderful responses. It sounds like my focus should be on finding the best NP program without regard to where it's located! Great information and advice

  • Jan 17

    RN's most definitely do heavy lifting! I work in the ICU and we pretty much do total patient care. That means bed baths, Q2hr turns, cleaning and changing, and any other activity. Many of our patients are sedated and on the ventilator which means we do all of the turning without any assistance from our patients.

    Of course I am sure there are areas of nursing that aren't as physical such as clinic nursing or perhaps ambulatory. But you will definitely have to do heavy lifting to get through nursing school even if you are lucky to land a less physical job in nursing as a new grad!

    Good luck

  • Jan 17

    RN's most definitely do heavy lifting! I work in the ICU and we pretty much do total patient care. That means bed baths, Q2hr turns, cleaning and changing, and any other activity. Many of our patients are sedated and on the ventilator which means we do all of the turning without any assistance from our patients.

    Of course I am sure there are areas of nursing that aren't as physical such as clinic nursing or perhaps ambulatory. But you will definitely have to do heavy lifting to get through nursing school even if you are lucky to land a less physical job in nursing as a new grad!

    Good luck

  • Jan 17

    RN's most definitely do heavy lifting! I work in the ICU and we pretty much do total patient care. That means bed baths, Q2hr turns, cleaning and changing, and any other activity. Many of our patients are sedated and on the ventilator which means we do all of the turning without any assistance from our patients.

    Of course I am sure there are areas of nursing that aren't as physical such as clinic nursing or perhaps ambulatory. But you will definitely have to do heavy lifting to get through nursing school even if you are lucky to land a less physical job in nursing as a new grad!

    Good luck

  • Jan 17

    Quote from TheCommuter
    I worked 12-hour night shifts for 5.5 years (mid-2010 until December 2015). My weight yo-yo'd up and down until I started exercising first thing in the morning, immediately after my shift ended. I went from 180 to 128 pounds, representing a loss of 52 pounds in eight months.

    And yes, I'd eat a high protein 'breakfast' before going to bed. It would usually be full fat cottage cheese or turkey cold cuts with a slice of sharp cheddar.

    Contrary to popular beliefs, dietary fat is not the enemy...on the other hand, refined carbohydrates will cause carb-sensitive people like me to become bloated and gain weight uncontrollably due to an exaggerated insulin response.
    Congrats on your weight loss and healthy lifestyle changes! Very good information!

  • Jan 17

    Quote from LadyFree28
    This.

    When I worked nights, I ended up losing ten pounds.

    I eat pretty well; fresh fruits and veggies, complex carbs, proteins and dairy with less fat-a well balance diet with a few treats in between, and lots of water, smoothies, and keep my snacking to no more than 200 calories.

    What I can recall is eating before my shift was over-at least between 0530-0630 so when I went home I took a shower, and went to bed.
    Sounds like a healthy diet and a good way to fuel your night shift!


close
close