Latest Comments by HippyDippyLPN

HippyDippyLPN 4,831 Views

Joined Feb 18, '12. Posts: 354 (30% Liked) Likes: 261

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  • 0

    Hi all...

    Wondering if anyone has been in my situation before. I am an LPN bridging to my RN (hoping this board moves faster than the LPN to RN board so I can get answers) and will have to utilize daycare my last year of school. I work full time now but will be unable to do so once my program starts and my husband makes too much for us to qualify for daycare assistance. As of right now my husband and I work opposite shifts to avoid daycare but that will unfortunately not work once I start clinicals since I have to be there so early and he will not be off work till 2 hours after my start time.

    Has anyone taken out a student loan just for living expense and if so, where from? I have weighed the risks and financial aspects of taking out such a loan and now need to start researching before I apply to clinicals...any advice/comment would be greatly appreciated.

    My tuition is already paid for through government loans (ones I have to pay back) but I only get enough to cover my class prices and books so it will have to be a private loan....

  • 0

    This is bizzare! I don't get why OM would push you out like that when you had always gotten along, any idea? Maybe OM is doing something wrong and by firing you it's taking the heat off her? They will say you resigned but will they say you gave two weeks? Can you go above the OM's head and elevate this, what about the doctor's you work for? In my experience OM's very rarely have degrees or experience related to their duties which often makes a confusing or hostile work environment. A former MA was the OM at my last job, it was a mess!

  • 0

    Take a break, switch jobs, or switch fields for some time to see what you really want to do. I also became an LPN younger than most and in 2012 I just had to step away from nursing for a year and make my heart and head were in it. I stayed home with my kids for a year and it confirmed that I want to be a nurse, I just want more options, so I am in an LPN bridge program now. My good friend just quit her LPN Job because of burn out to go sell cars! And she seems to love it. When you choose your career so young sometimes you question it but ya just gotta get out there and see if there is something else you may enjoy. For me, as much as I think I may be crazy for this, nursing is it for me but I didn't realize that till I took some time off to reflect and decompress.

  • 1
    grudgrime likes this.

    I quit last July but march 2013 I had to take a nicotine test that I passed. I had smoked for 10 years, was smoking about 10 cigs a day. I didn't smoke that day and drank water. At the time I was 5'7 and 180 lbs (lost 40 lbs after I quit). My job screened for insurance purposes though, they still hired you if you were a smoker with the understanding you wouldn't smoke on company property.

  • 0

    Just keep plugging away is all...when I graduated late 2008 with my LPN license it took me till January 2010 to gain employment, I worked as an aid to float myself financially during that time. Now I can get interviews fairly easy if I need too, I took a year off in 2012 to stay home with my baby and when I went job searching in 2013 I accepted a good position after only 2-3 weeks of putting in applications. Experience has a lot to do with it I'm sure you know that already, it will happen!

  • 0

    To be honest, have not heard great things about Beckfield or any for profit nursing trade school in the Cincinnati area. IMO many lack the correct educational courses and certifications needed to give you any edge in the overcrowded job market. I go to a CC and while it will take me longer than if I went to somewhere like Beckfield (3 years at part time) it's worth it to me not to pay 50k for a quick, subpar education.

  • 4

    Just lie if you feel you have to say something. Honestly I wouldn't care what your pre req classmates think (I don't). I am there to make stellar grades, not friends, so i would tell people too bad so sad but then again I'm a bit of an arse lol.

  • 0

    My bridge program at a local CC is much less competitive than the regular RN program. The bridge program is it own program and doesn't mix with the traditional RN students at all. Students are gaining admittance to the bride with 3.1 GPA's (min is 2.8, 40 Max spots, 60 usually apply) and with the traditional RN program you really need in the high 3's to get in. Hours worked as an LPN does not matter but they tell you if you can't keep up in clinicals your out.

  • 0

    I'm plugging away at my LPN to RN program (part time student), I also though work full time during the day and have two kiddos 2 & 4 years old. Financially I can afford to not work (or perhaps gain PRN employment) for the remainder of my time in the bridge. After a year of carrying 9-10 credit hours per semester and working full time, I'm hitting a wall and would like to quit but am worried about job chances after graduation. I have a 4.0 but it is becoming tougher to maintain as the classes become harder, I just simply run out of hours in a day. What do you all do during your bridge, PRN, etc? If you do not work are you afraid you will not gain employment as easy after you pass RN boards?

  • 1
    subee likes this.

    Our government cannot get one single thing done but yet they still get paid. I used to be a democrat, now I am neither, both parties lie, cheat, and are out of touch with middle class Americans. I am so frustrated that I pay $75/visit(which is on top of our premium we pay each month) for anyone in my family to see any kind of doctor but the lady down the street keeps poppin' her kids out for free and they can go to the ped all the time because it doesn't cost her a dime. I am a bit off topic here and usually I don't get fired up about stuff but this makes me mad that this policy is being pushed back. When I go to work and can't get anything done i face being fired, our government does it and they vote themselves a raise and a vacation. Ugh.

  • 0

    I am taking out loans through financial aid myself but my program is only 6k per year and I think that's a steal now a days. You could pay per semester if your able to work that much or find a job that will help finance your schooling.

  • 1
    Nathifalr26 likes this.

    That's a invasion of privacy. The only personal thing my college needs to know are the things that are pertinent to receiving financial aid, other than that it's no ones business how you pay your bills or your relationship status. Definitely file a complaint with the BBB and do not let anyone tell you what you should be. In my area becoming an MA is not a smart choice, the job field is more saturated than nursing and you have less options.

  • 0

    In LTC I took care of a lady who was 101. She was sharp as a tack and up until the end could mostly take care of herself, died peacefully in her sleep one night.

  • 4

    I graduated high school with a 2.4. I graduated LPN school with a 3.8. I am starting my LPN to RN bridge this fall and get to skip many pre reqs because I tested into college level courses, including math which I took intermediate algebra 3x before I passed it in high school.

    I was too busy socializing to be bothered with hard work in high school and just assumes I was "not smart enough" so I had (in my young immature mind) an excuse to do poorly. I paid and am paying for all of my schooling, I wanted to do well, so I did. Don't let previous schooling be your track record, prove yourself wrong. I did and am doing so now, I'm proud of myself for being the student I could have been all along!

  • 0

    I will be working full time while I do pre reqs for my bridge part time. I plan on completing all co reqs during this time as well so that when I enter the clinical portion I will only need one to two days off a week for that. The bridge program at my CC does put you in the second year of the ADN program but you have less clinical hours to be completed than the regular ADN students. We are a seperate clinical rotation than the regular ADN students as well since its accelerated.


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