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100kids, BSN, RN 7,313 Views

Joined Dec 7, '11. Posts: 775 (55% Liked) Likes: 1,105

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  • 10:06 am

    None and I am the only Nurse in the District so it was a really a figure it out yourself type of situation! Those were a fun first few weeks! Reach out to other Nurses in your district (if you have them) or in neighboring districts for help/questions. Good Luck!

  • Dec 21 '16

    Quote from heinz57

    Why is a child separated from their inhaler during PE?
    Why aren't they bronchodilating before exercise if they have been diagnosed with Exercise Induced Asthma?

    If they are wheezing, you screwed up by not allowing them to bronchodilate prior to exercise. .
    Nope. If they are supposed to bronchodilate before PE this would or should be in the orders from their Dr (we do have some with those instructions) but if it's not there and the orders are written "prn for tightness or wheezing" then there's nothing we can do. If they are having regular problems after PE I will call home and recommend they discuss it with their child's physician but I can't just change the orders to whatever I want.


    Quote from heinz57
    What are the ages of all these kids who have their inhalers locked up in the office? We are going into 2017. Time to stop punishing kids for having asthma. I see 5 year olds who can tell me more about their medications than their caregivers can.
    Are you kidding me? School Nurses are probably one of the biggest group of advocates for children with asthma. I try to have kids in my school self carry as early as possible but in my state Dr, parent and School Nurse permission is needed and often the physician or parents don't trust the kids to have them and want them kept in my office. I try to educate my students on their asthma because many of them are told basically nothing from their physician except take this inhaler if you need it and I try to help both them and their parents understand what their medications are doing (or supposed to do) and the discussions they may want to have with their Dr. if they are experiencing difficulties and/or are using their rescue medication frequently. I'm glad you see 5 years old who are so knowledgeable but I see kids age 3-12 who have no clue and many of their parents don't really understand it either.

    To the OP No. I don't ever deny an inhaler but if there is frequent use I always call home and discuss the increased usage and the possible need to consult with their physician about getting better control of their asthma.

  • Dec 13 '16

    Quote from heinz57

    Why is a child separated from their inhaler during PE?
    Why aren't they bronchodilating before exercise if they have been diagnosed with Exercise Induced Asthma?

    If they are wheezing, you screwed up by not allowing them to bronchodilate prior to exercise. .
    Nope. If they are supposed to bronchodilate before PE this would or should be in the orders from their Dr (we do have some with those instructions) but if it's not there and the orders are written "prn for tightness or wheezing" then there's nothing we can do. If they are having regular problems after PE I will call home and recommend they discuss it with their child's physician but I can't just change the orders to whatever I want.


    Quote from heinz57
    What are the ages of all these kids who have their inhalers locked up in the office? We are going into 2017. Time to stop punishing kids for having asthma. I see 5 year olds who can tell me more about their medications than their caregivers can.
    Are you kidding me? School Nurses are probably one of the biggest group of advocates for children with asthma. I try to have kids in my school self carry as early as possible but in my state Dr, parent and School Nurse permission is needed and often the physician or parents don't trust the kids to have them and want them kept in my office. I try to educate my students on their asthma because many of them are told basically nothing from their physician except take this inhaler if you need it and I try to help both them and their parents understand what their medications are doing (or supposed to do) and the discussions they may want to have with their Dr. if they are experiencing difficulties and/or are using their rescue medication frequently. I'm glad you see 5 years old who are so knowledgeable but I see kids age 3-12 who have no clue and many of their parents don't really understand it either.

    To the OP No. I don't ever deny an inhaler but if there is frequent use I always call home and discuss the increased usage and the possible need to consult with their physician about getting better control of their asthma.

  • Dec 13 '16

    work on the 23rd off until the 3rd. It wont be enough time.

  • Dec 13 '16

    work on the 23rd off until the 3rd. It wont be enough time.

  • Dec 13 '16

    Quote from OldDude
    I'm a big fan of the movie Mr. Woodcock, where the high school coach forces the asthmatic kid to run laps to learn how to control his asthma. That's what we do at my school. Lock up the inhalers and make the asthmatic kids run laps to break them of wanting to use their inhalers. What do their doctors know about asthma anyway????
    Exactly!!!

  • Dec 13 '16

    Quote from heinz57

    Why is a child separated from their inhaler during PE?
    Why aren't they bronchodilating before exercise if they have been diagnosed with Exercise Induced Asthma?

    If they are wheezing, you screwed up by not allowing them to bronchodilate prior to exercise. .
    Nope. If they are supposed to bronchodilate before PE this would or should be in the orders from their Dr (we do have some with those instructions) but if it's not there and the orders are written "prn for tightness or wheezing" then there's nothing we can do. If they are having regular problems after PE I will call home and recommend they discuss it with their child's physician but I can't just change the orders to whatever I want.


    Quote from heinz57
    What are the ages of all these kids who have their inhalers locked up in the office? We are going into 2017. Time to stop punishing kids for having asthma. I see 5 year olds who can tell me more about their medications than their caregivers can.
    Are you kidding me? School Nurses are probably one of the biggest group of advocates for children with asthma. I try to have kids in my school self carry as early as possible but in my state Dr, parent and School Nurse permission is needed and often the physician or parents don't trust the kids to have them and want them kept in my office. I try to educate my students on their asthma because many of them are told basically nothing from their physician except take this inhaler if you need it and I try to help both them and their parents understand what their medications are doing (or supposed to do) and the discussions they may want to have with their Dr. if they are experiencing difficulties and/or are using their rescue medication frequently. I'm glad you see 5 years old who are so knowledgeable but I see kids age 3-12 who have no clue and many of their parents don't really understand it either.

    To the OP No. I don't ever deny an inhaler but if there is frequent use I always call home and discuss the increased usage and the possible need to consult with their physician about getting better control of their asthma.

  • Dec 13 '16

    Quote from OldDude
    I'm a big fan of the movie Mr. Woodcock, where the high school coach forces the asthmatic kid to run laps to learn how to control his asthma. That's what we do at my school. Lock up the inhalers and make the asthmatic kids run laps to break them of wanting to use their inhalers. What do their doctors know about asthma anyway????
    Exactly!!!

  • Dec 13 '16

    Quote from OldDude
    I'm a big fan of the movie Mr. Woodcock, where the high school coach forces the asthmatic kid to run laps to learn how to control his asthma. That's what we do at my school. Lock up the inhalers and make the asthmatic kids run laps to break them of wanting to use their inhalers. What do their doctors know about asthma anyway????
    Exactly!!!

  • Dec 13 '16

    Quote from heinz57

    Why is a child separated from their inhaler during PE?
    Why aren't they bronchodilating before exercise if they have been diagnosed with Exercise Induced Asthma?

    If they are wheezing, you screwed up by not allowing them to bronchodilate prior to exercise. .
    Nope. If they are supposed to bronchodilate before PE this would or should be in the orders from their Dr (we do have some with those instructions) but if it's not there and the orders are written "prn for tightness or wheezing" then there's nothing we can do. If they are having regular problems after PE I will call home and recommend they discuss it with their child's physician but I can't just change the orders to whatever I want.


    Quote from heinz57
    What are the ages of all these kids who have their inhalers locked up in the office? We are going into 2017. Time to stop punishing kids for having asthma. I see 5 year olds who can tell me more about their medications than their caregivers can.
    Are you kidding me? School Nurses are probably one of the biggest group of advocates for children with asthma. I try to have kids in my school self carry as early as possible but in my state Dr, parent and School Nurse permission is needed and often the physician or parents don't trust the kids to have them and want them kept in my office. I try to educate my students on their asthma because many of them are told basically nothing from their physician except take this inhaler if you need it and I try to help both them and their parents understand what their medications are doing (or supposed to do) and the discussions they may want to have with their Dr. if they are experiencing difficulties and/or are using their rescue medication frequently. I'm glad you see 5 years old who are so knowledgeable but I see kids age 3-12 who have no clue and many of their parents don't really understand it either.

    To the OP No. I don't ever deny an inhaler but if there is frequent use I always call home and discuss the increased usage and the possible need to consult with their physician about getting better control of their asthma.

  • Dec 13 '16

    Quote from Flare
    My overall point in this post - we do the best we can with what we're given - yet we're still given grief and the shoulda coulda woulda by people that are not in our trenches.
    This exactly!!!

  • Dec 13 '16

    Quote from heinz57

    Why is a child separated from their inhaler during PE?
    Why aren't they bronchodilating before exercise if they have been diagnosed with Exercise Induced Asthma?

    If they are wheezing, you screwed up by not allowing them to bronchodilate prior to exercise. .
    Nope. If they are supposed to bronchodilate before PE this would or should be in the orders from their Dr (we do have some with those instructions) but if it's not there and the orders are written "prn for tightness or wheezing" then there's nothing we can do. If they are having regular problems after PE I will call home and recommend they discuss it with their child's physician but I can't just change the orders to whatever I want.


    Quote from heinz57
    What are the ages of all these kids who have their inhalers locked up in the office? We are going into 2017. Time to stop punishing kids for having asthma. I see 5 year olds who can tell me more about their medications than their caregivers can.
    Are you kidding me? School Nurses are probably one of the biggest group of advocates for children with asthma. I try to have kids in my school self carry as early as possible but in my state Dr, parent and School Nurse permission is needed and often the physician or parents don't trust the kids to have them and want them kept in my office. I try to educate my students on their asthma because many of them are told basically nothing from their physician except take this inhaler if you need it and I try to help both them and their parents understand what their medications are doing (or supposed to do) and the discussions they may want to have with their Dr. if they are experiencing difficulties and/or are using their rescue medication frequently. I'm glad you see 5 years old who are so knowledgeable but I see kids age 3-12 who have no clue and many of their parents don't really understand it either.

    To the OP No. I don't ever deny an inhaler but if there is frequent use I always call home and discuss the increased usage and the possible need to consult with their physician about getting better control of their asthma.

  • Dec 13 '16

    Quote from Flare
    My overall point in this post - we do the best we can with what we're given - yet we're still given grief and the shoulda coulda woulda by people that are not in our trenches.
    This exactly!!!

  • Dec 13 '16

    Quote from heinz57

    Why is a child separated from their inhaler during PE?
    Why aren't they bronchodilating before exercise if they have been diagnosed with Exercise Induced Asthma?

    If they are wheezing, you screwed up by not allowing them to bronchodilate prior to exercise. .
    Nope. If they are supposed to bronchodilate before PE this would or should be in the orders from their Dr (we do have some with those instructions) but if it's not there and the orders are written "prn for tightness or wheezing" then there's nothing we can do. If they are having regular problems after PE I will call home and recommend they discuss it with their child's physician but I can't just change the orders to whatever I want.


    Quote from heinz57
    What are the ages of all these kids who have their inhalers locked up in the office? We are going into 2017. Time to stop punishing kids for having asthma. I see 5 year olds who can tell me more about their medications than their caregivers can.
    Are you kidding me? School Nurses are probably one of the biggest group of advocates for children with asthma. I try to have kids in my school self carry as early as possible but in my state Dr, parent and School Nurse permission is needed and often the physician or parents don't trust the kids to have them and want them kept in my office. I try to educate my students on their asthma because many of them are told basically nothing from their physician except take this inhaler if you need it and I try to help both them and their parents understand what their medications are doing (or supposed to do) and the discussions they may want to have with their Dr. if they are experiencing difficulties and/or are using their rescue medication frequently. I'm glad you see 5 years old who are so knowledgeable but I see kids age 3-12 who have no clue and many of their parents don't really understand it either.

    To the OP No. I don't ever deny an inhaler but if there is frequent use I always call home and discuss the increased usage and the possible need to consult with their physician about getting better control of their asthma.

  • Dec 13 '16

    Quote from heinz57

    Why is a child separated from their inhaler during PE?
    Why aren't they bronchodilating before exercise if they have been diagnosed with Exercise Induced Asthma?

    If they are wheezing, you screwed up by not allowing them to bronchodilate prior to exercise. .
    Nope. If they are supposed to bronchodilate before PE this would or should be in the orders from their Dr (we do have some with those instructions) but if it's not there and the orders are written "prn for tightness or wheezing" then there's nothing we can do. If they are having regular problems after PE I will call home and recommend they discuss it with their child's physician but I can't just change the orders to whatever I want.


    Quote from heinz57
    What are the ages of all these kids who have their inhalers locked up in the office? We are going into 2017. Time to stop punishing kids for having asthma. I see 5 year olds who can tell me more about their medications than their caregivers can.
    Are you kidding me? School Nurses are probably one of the biggest group of advocates for children with asthma. I try to have kids in my school self carry as early as possible but in my state Dr, parent and School Nurse permission is needed and often the physician or parents don't trust the kids to have them and want them kept in my office. I try to educate my students on their asthma because many of them are told basically nothing from their physician except take this inhaler if you need it and I try to help both them and their parents understand what their medications are doing (or supposed to do) and the discussions they may want to have with their Dr. if they are experiencing difficulties and/or are using their rescue medication frequently. I'm glad you see 5 years old who are so knowledgeable but I see kids age 3-12 who have no clue and many of their parents don't really understand it either.

    To the OP No. I don't ever deny an inhaler but if there is frequent use I always call home and discuss the increased usage and the possible need to consult with their physician about getting better control of their asthma.


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