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100kids, BSN, RN 9,799 Views

Joined Dec 7, '11. Posts: 812 (56% Liked) Likes: 1,172

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  • Nov 14

    1st let me say congrats on your new job! I just started last year and certainly the 1st year is a roller coaster but I loved it! Post here often there is lots of good advice and helpful hints. For me, going through all of the old stuff in the office and purging a lot of the really ancient stuff did a lot for me. I feel like my first year I did things the way the old nurse did it with a little tweaking of my own but next year I am fully ready to set things up the way I want. It took me some time to figure out what I use most, where things are easily accessible in my office and what things could be in the back of my cabinets. Give your self some time to get a feel for your office and move things as you see a need. The 1st year will be a lot of adjusting (I couldn't believe the paperwork) and learning (I had never been involved with IEPs or 504s before). Have a great 1st year and don't be afraid to NOT do things the way the last nurse did. You will find your own groove.

  • Nov 1

    Yeah I agree I never refuse to give the med but if I think it's a problem or a crutch I communicate that with the parents. There's always more to the story...

  • Oct 27

    I created most of my own Health curriculum for grades k-6. I find that no one else does it the way I want it. I like to google health curriculum or health lesson for each grade and then I start with an idea there and go from there and design what I want to teach and how depending upon the class.

  • Oct 25

    Less than 25 minutes after arrival at school student comes down just not feeling well, feels nauseous and his stomach hurts then proceeds to tell me he was throwing up all last night but mom wanted him to try to go to school today! C'MON!!!

    Shocking update-mom's phones are all going to voicemail.

  • Oct 24

    Epi pen for School program here as well. They have the info on what you need on their site. Our School Dr. was willing to sign standing orders and write a prescription for me. The whole process was pretty easy. Good luck!

  • Oct 17

    That's great! I love teaching the little guys! They get really into it.

  • Oct 10

    Quote from OldDude
    What is down time?
    I was thinking the same thing. I never seem to have any down time.

  • Oct 4

    I love salt water gargles for sore throat. It also helps determine who is faking. No one really likes a salt water gargle BUT if they are really suffering I find most kids will try it.

  • Sep 30

    School Nursing is not for everyone but based on all the School Nurses I know (IRL and on AN) I'm guessing you won't be bored for long. Yes in School Nursing it's not always emergency here, problem here type of busy but I never finish what I need to do in a day here. These kids are all my kids. I worry about them like my own as well. Have I prepared little Johnny to be able to self-carry his inhaler as he gets older, is Sam ok or are there troubles at home I need to watch for, how can I help Jenny's family with diabetes education because they are not getting it from their physician, how can I help Julia handle her anxiety and stay in the classroom instead of being a frequent flyer, how can I help these children become their best selves and live happy, healthy lives? The mounds of paperwork and screenings somehow get done before the end of the year BUT that is not my real job in my opinion. My job is to help the chronically ill students be able to attend and function in school and to help all of the students be able to attend school and learn. Sometimes this involves educating the students, sometimes it's educating and encouraging the parents. In the middle of all this are the hockey sticks to the face at recess, the peanut butter and jelly at the lunch table, the student fainting in the auditorium and the diabetic student whose readings range form 38 to 438.

    I work in a very small school so I have many other hats I wear in my building (attendance, health teacher, dismissal coordination, etc). I would suggest getting to know the teachers and students in your school. Offer to come into the classroom and read a book or discuss germs and hand washing, or healthy eating or the body systems. Being the Nurse in a school of educators can be isolating, but my advice would be if you have time on your hands try to integrate yourself into the education world at your school. The highs of this job, when I go home and know I made the difference in a child's life, they are huge. I hope you find them where you are as well.

  • Sep 29

    School Nursing is not for everyone but based on all the School Nurses I know (IRL and on AN) I'm guessing you won't be bored for long. Yes in School Nursing it's not always emergency here, problem here type of busy but I never finish what I need to do in a day here. These kids are all my kids. I worry about them like my own as well. Have I prepared little Johnny to be able to self-carry his inhaler as he gets older, is Sam ok or are there troubles at home I need to watch for, how can I help Jenny's family with diabetes education because they are not getting it from their physician, how can I help Julia handle her anxiety and stay in the classroom instead of being a frequent flyer, how can I help these children become their best selves and live happy, healthy lives? The mounds of paperwork and screenings somehow get done before the end of the year BUT that is not my real job in my opinion. My job is to help the chronically ill students be able to attend and function in school and to help all of the students be able to attend school and learn. Sometimes this involves educating the students, sometimes it's educating and encouraging the parents. In the middle of all this are the hockey sticks to the face at recess, the peanut butter and jelly at the lunch table, the student fainting in the auditorium and the diabetic student whose readings range form 38 to 438.

    I work in a very small school so I have many other hats I wear in my building (attendance, health teacher, dismissal coordination, etc). I would suggest getting to know the teachers and students in your school. Offer to come into the classroom and read a book or discuss germs and hand washing, or healthy eating or the body systems. Being the Nurse in a school of educators can be isolating, but my advice would be if you have time on your hands try to integrate yourself into the education world at your school. The highs of this job, when I go home and know I made the difference in a child's life, they are huge. I hope you find them where you are as well.

  • Sep 29

    School Nursing is not for everyone but based on all the School Nurses I know (IRL and on AN) I'm guessing you won't be bored for long. Yes in School Nursing it's not always emergency here, problem here type of busy but I never finish what I need to do in a day here. These kids are all my kids. I worry about them like my own as well. Have I prepared little Johnny to be able to self-carry his inhaler as he gets older, is Sam ok or are there troubles at home I need to watch for, how can I help Jenny's family with diabetes education because they are not getting it from their physician, how can I help Julia handle her anxiety and stay in the classroom instead of being a frequent flyer, how can I help these children become their best selves and live happy, healthy lives? The mounds of paperwork and screenings somehow get done before the end of the year BUT that is not my real job in my opinion. My job is to help the chronically ill students be able to attend and function in school and to help all of the students be able to attend school and learn. Sometimes this involves educating the students, sometimes it's educating and encouraging the parents. In the middle of all this are the hockey sticks to the face at recess, the peanut butter and jelly at the lunch table, the student fainting in the auditorium and the diabetic student whose readings range form 38 to 438.

    I work in a very small school so I have many other hats I wear in my building (attendance, health teacher, dismissal coordination, etc). I would suggest getting to know the teachers and students in your school. Offer to come into the classroom and read a book or discuss germs and hand washing, or healthy eating or the body systems. Being the Nurse in a school of educators can be isolating, but my advice would be if you have time on your hands try to integrate yourself into the education world at your school. The highs of this job, when I go home and know I made the difference in a child's life, they are huge. I hope you find them where you are as well.

  • Sep 29

    School Nursing is not for everyone but based on all the School Nurses I know (IRL and on AN) I'm guessing you won't be bored for long. Yes in School Nursing it's not always emergency here, problem here type of busy but I never finish what I need to do in a day here. These kids are all my kids. I worry about them like my own as well. Have I prepared little Johnny to be able to self-carry his inhaler as he gets older, is Sam ok or are there troubles at home I need to watch for, how can I help Jenny's family with diabetes education because they are not getting it from their physician, how can I help Julia handle her anxiety and stay in the classroom instead of being a frequent flyer, how can I help these children become their best selves and live happy, healthy lives? The mounds of paperwork and screenings somehow get done before the end of the year BUT that is not my real job in my opinion. My job is to help the chronically ill students be able to attend and function in school and to help all of the students be able to attend school and learn. Sometimes this involves educating the students, sometimes it's educating and encouraging the parents. In the middle of all this are the hockey sticks to the face at recess, the peanut butter and jelly at the lunch table, the student fainting in the auditorium and the diabetic student whose readings range form 38 to 438.

    I work in a very small school so I have many other hats I wear in my building (attendance, health teacher, dismissal coordination, etc). I would suggest getting to know the teachers and students in your school. Offer to come into the classroom and read a book or discuss germs and hand washing, or healthy eating or the body systems. Being the Nurse in a school of educators can be isolating, but my advice would be if you have time on your hands try to integrate yourself into the education world at your school. The highs of this job, when I go home and know I made the difference in a child's life, they are huge. I hope you find them where you are as well.

  • Sep 29

    School Nursing is not for everyone but based on all the School Nurses I know (IRL and on AN) I'm guessing you won't be bored for long. Yes in School Nursing it's not always emergency here, problem here type of busy but I never finish what I need to do in a day here. These kids are all my kids. I worry about them like my own as well. Have I prepared little Johnny to be able to self-carry his inhaler as he gets older, is Sam ok or are there troubles at home I need to watch for, how can I help Jenny's family with diabetes education because they are not getting it from their physician, how can I help Julia handle her anxiety and stay in the classroom instead of being a frequent flyer, how can I help these children become their best selves and live happy, healthy lives? The mounds of paperwork and screenings somehow get done before the end of the year BUT that is not my real job in my opinion. My job is to help the chronically ill students be able to attend and function in school and to help all of the students be able to attend school and learn. Sometimes this involves educating the students, sometimes it's educating and encouraging the parents. In the middle of all this are the hockey sticks to the face at recess, the peanut butter and jelly at the lunch table, the student fainting in the auditorium and the diabetic student whose readings range form 38 to 438.

    I work in a very small school so I have many other hats I wear in my building (attendance, health teacher, dismissal coordination, etc). I would suggest getting to know the teachers and students in your school. Offer to come into the classroom and read a book or discuss germs and hand washing, or healthy eating or the body systems. Being the Nurse in a school of educators can be isolating, but my advice would be if you have time on your hands try to integrate yourself into the education world at your school. The highs of this job, when I go home and know I made the difference in a child's life, they are huge. I hope you find them where you are as well.

  • Sep 29

    School Nursing is not for everyone but based on all the School Nurses I know (IRL and on AN) I'm guessing you won't be bored for long. Yes in School Nursing it's not always emergency here, problem here type of busy but I never finish what I need to do in a day here. These kids are all my kids. I worry about them like my own as well. Have I prepared little Johnny to be able to self-carry his inhaler as he gets older, is Sam ok or are there troubles at home I need to watch for, how can I help Jenny's family with diabetes education because they are not getting it from their physician, how can I help Julia handle her anxiety and stay in the classroom instead of being a frequent flyer, how can I help these children become their best selves and live happy, healthy lives? The mounds of paperwork and screenings somehow get done before the end of the year BUT that is not my real job in my opinion. My job is to help the chronically ill students be able to attend and function in school and to help all of the students be able to attend school and learn. Sometimes this involves educating the students, sometimes it's educating and encouraging the parents. In the middle of all this are the hockey sticks to the face at recess, the peanut butter and jelly at the lunch table, the student fainting in the auditorium and the diabetic student whose readings range form 38 to 438.

    I work in a very small school so I have many other hats I wear in my building (attendance, health teacher, dismissal coordination, etc). I would suggest getting to know the teachers and students in your school. Offer to come into the classroom and read a book or discuss germs and hand washing, or healthy eating or the body systems. Being the Nurse in a school of educators can be isolating, but my advice would be if you have time on your hands try to integrate yourself into the education world at your school. The highs of this job, when I go home and know I made the difference in a child's life, they are huge. I hope you find them where you are as well.

  • Sep 29

    School Nursing is not for everyone but based on all the School Nurses I know (IRL and on AN) I'm guessing you won't be bored for long. Yes in School Nursing it's not always emergency here, problem here type of busy but I never finish what I need to do in a day here. These kids are all my kids. I worry about them like my own as well. Have I prepared little Johnny to be able to self-carry his inhaler as he gets older, is Sam ok or are there troubles at home I need to watch for, how can I help Jenny's family with diabetes education because they are not getting it from their physician, how can I help Julia handle her anxiety and stay in the classroom instead of being a frequent flyer, how can I help these children become their best selves and live happy, healthy lives? The mounds of paperwork and screenings somehow get done before the end of the year BUT that is not my real job in my opinion. My job is to help the chronically ill students be able to attend and function in school and to help all of the students be able to attend school and learn. Sometimes this involves educating the students, sometimes it's educating and encouraging the parents. In the middle of all this are the hockey sticks to the face at recess, the peanut butter and jelly at the lunch table, the student fainting in the auditorium and the diabetic student whose readings range form 38 to 438.

    I work in a very small school so I have many other hats I wear in my building (attendance, health teacher, dismissal coordination, etc). I would suggest getting to know the teachers and students in your school. Offer to come into the classroom and read a book or discuss germs and hand washing, or healthy eating or the body systems. Being the Nurse in a school of educators can be isolating, but my advice would be if you have time on your hands try to integrate yourself into the education world at your school. The highs of this job, when I go home and know I made the difference in a child's life, they are huge. I hope you find them where you are as well.


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