Latest Comments by LillyFish

Latest Comments by LillyFish

LillyFish 1,814 Views

Joined Nov 4, '11. Posts: 21 (24% Liked) Likes: 14

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  • 0

    I have witnessed several nurses performing saline flushes on lines when administering meds, drawing blood, etc. I'm hoping someone can tell me if this is correct procedure because I don't want to be doing something wrong: First, the nurse prepares the prepackaged flush by removing the air in the syringe. He/She takes the cap off the end, careful not to touch it to any surfaces, pushes the plunger until the saline is at the tip and air is expelled, then replaces the cap. (seems safe to me, no contamination). Next, cleans the access cap to the patient's line with alcohol, uncaps the flush and pushes anywhere from 3-5 mls saline into the line, then removes the flush, lays it on the bedside table tray or the bed (this is where I'm concerned), pushes the next syringe of medicine (ok here-no comtamination), and then picks the flush back up and flushes the line again with 3-5mls. My problem is with the second flush. Is it, at this point, contaminated? And should a nurse technically be bringing two flushes to the scene? I have also seen a nurse draw up meds into a syringe, take off the needle, and haul it uncapped to the bedside to administer. I have personally left the needle on and capped, and removed it at the bedside, making sure to throw it away when I'm done. I feel like the fewer times I recap something, the better. Thoughts?

  • 0

    Would someone give me a solid rationale for why one would not empty an NG suction container for an immunocompromised patient? I was told that emptying the container every 4 hours poses a risk of infection to the patient and never to unhook the canister from the tubing until it's full. When it's full, it gets removed from the room and placed in the dirty utility until waste control picks it up. This patient is periodically flushed with 30 mls tap water and when suction is not in use, the canister tubing is left hanging at the bedside and the patient's NG is clamped. Why is tap water and a dangling suction tube ok, and periodic emptying of the container not? I'm inclined to believe that this is just the way it's done on this particular unit with no real understanding of why. In this case, I think it's just preference rather than evidence based practice, but if I'm wrong, please correct me.

  • 0

    Hi everyone,
    I will be graduating in less than a year with my BSN and still haven't really narrowed down my focus yet as to which area of nursing I'd like to go into at the RN level to best prepare myself for working as a family nurse practitioner later on. I'd like to get good, relevant experience in the years I'll be working as an RN before applying to a FNP master's program. What suggestions do you have? Or what has your path been?
    Thanks!

  • 0

    I would like to work in a clinic/dr's office.

  • 0

    I should mention that there is a possibility for me to get a Peds ER position. Also, we need 2+ years experience as an RN before applying to the MSN program for the NP track. So I anticipate having 1 year student experience plus 4+ years as an RN before receiving my MSN degree. I've read several threads on this forum and it seems that ER and ICU are good experiences. Would you agree?

  • 0

    Hi all,
    I am a BSN student looking for a student nurse job. Many times where I go to school, the student nurse moves into the RN position in the department that he/she works in. In looking for a student nurse job, I'm hoping to get some advice as to what areas to apply for to gain the most experience and to best prepare myself as a student and later an RN for when I apply to the MSN program to work toward my ultimate goal of family nurse practitioner. What area/s of nursing do you think best prepare one for the family nurse practitioner role? Thanks!!


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