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BostonTerrierLoverRN 19,203 Views

Joined: Oct 5, '11; Posts: 1,272 (77% Liked) ; Likes: 3,911
Travel Nursing/ER/Trauma; from US
Specialty: 10 year(s) of experience in Adult/Ped Emergency and Trauma

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  • Apr 13

    Go to Travel Nursing Sites: Fastaff, American Mobile/Nursing, and On Assignment/Nursing- and look at example salaries. I have never worked a strike, strictly Travel/Per Diem/Contract, and it is very possible to make over 100K per year even as an ADN. It may not be as normal as before the Great Recession, but Full Time, 12 Monthers making $39-42 hr can rake it in pretty quick. When you go into overtime making $42/hr, it doesn't take long to get there. Good Luck.

    I didn't get into Nursing for the Money either, but there is NO shame in wanting to profit and prosper from your hardwork, knowledge, and skills. I have values against strike nursing, but there are plenty who don't mind it- I don't condemn them as someone has to be there with the patient- but I have worked in some of the facilities that LATER had a strike, and I know what those nurses were putting up with. That said, "Strike Nursing" can pay upwards of $50-100/hr.

    Per Diem, in my experience, has paid the highest hourly rates/hr. But, it is important to add that there are NO BENEFITs given with the assignment. Therefore, unless it is local, you will be responsible for housing, travel, and any other expense that is accumulated.

    All of these, Strike/Contract/Travel Nursing, usually come with fully furnished private housing, trip reimbursement, and many have additional completion bonuses. Last year I got $5,000 for working a certain amount of hours from Thanksgiving to New Years Day including all 3 major holidays. They help arrange, and pay for any continuing education needed, certifications, and/or Licenses. It really spoiled me working with the three travel agencies I mentioned. No electric, water, rent, or cable bill was nice too while I was saving. I loved the lifestyle, and I loved to travel, just realized money doesn't equal happiness, and finally settled back at home; But, I could get the "itch" again anytime.

    If you don't mind living out of your suitcase for awhile, and being exhiled from family members in some cases, There is $$$ to be made in non-traditional hiring/placement.

  • Feb 21

    Ok,

    As an ER Coordinator, I have seen a few things off in interviews, but DEAR GOD, who hurt you so?

    It almost sounds like a vent!

    I always just feel sorry for the single mom in jeans who would be wearing dress pants if she could have afforded them, if I had put up a "red flag" I would have turned down one heck of a ER Tech, who is now a ER RN, One of "OUR," not "My" best on staff.

    These judgemental posts about how I am sooooooo much better than you because I follow the book to a "T," and "conform to the upper-crust of this Profession" sound so shallow and "God-complex" like.

    Some of the greatest minds out there have hair just like Einstien, or decided to get a tattoo, and I cannot begin to imagine how you differentiate on your patient care according to how they are dressed-or look.

    I think you missed your calling for cosmotologist, or a prissy hair dresser!

    Otherwise, I hope you work in a private, small, uptown hospital where you won't be ashamed by Wrangler wearing blue collar workers, but doubt that since you had to post a vent about hair washing, denim, and piercings!

    Old School is Okay, but Compassion, Understanding, and Empathy are still character traits that I would rather see than starch constipated china doll nurses!

    Thanks!

    Kyle

  • Jan 29

    Wow, some of my most highly respected posters are all here now, and I don't want to get you guys upset, I too am highly critical of the system, and how much of OUR money is wasted. So, to be very clear, where I draw the line is when stopping that funding would put an innocent child at risk. I agree with sooooooooooooooo much of what has been said, but even if I take a cut for an innocent child so be it. No matter how poor the parents decisions were. You guys just don't know how much I really respect your views!!!

    I too was in dire straights in Nursing School, my parents were totally unable to contribute. I worked full time, got married, but knew I couldn't afford children during the process, so I made a decision not to have any. Money was Sooooo tight, that if gasoline was this expensive in 2001-2003 I would be a Maintenance Man now instead of a Nurse Practitioner.

    I was that close to being broke. That close to being unable to provide food for my wife and I. We helped each other as we both worked all through school, but I thought about public assistance many nights we went to bed after a spam sandwich with ice water after a day of class and a 8-12 hr shift. I never did though because of pride, and fear. But, don't let that mean I think anything is wrong for a single mother to get Public help to get through school. Getting Married and having a wife to support, and to support me was my decision, so I couldn't ask anyone to help. I hope you guys understand, it's the child who didn't have a choice I am advocating for.

  • Jan 29

    ...and I totally agree that the more children, the more they get. But, it's the child in that situation. If a single Nurse looses their job, by all means, get in line. It's the child with no choice, no ability to change it, and totally innocently in need that I advocate for- and in this situation I sure wouldn't mind the Nurse who has paid in for years to SS to get help as well. For those- I don't mind the pay coming out of my check, or charitable giving. Because but by the grace of God -or good luck -I have been blessed.

  • Jan 29

    Well call me liberal (I always thought of myself a conservative.) But, I don't begrudge those kids getting chips, or fed with food stamps, and I certainly wouldn't want to trade places with any of them, even if it meant a free home. I am perfectly happy to work for what I have, but It's cold outside tonight, and those children didn't ask to be born to system users and abusers. So that's how I live with the current system; I couldn't live with putting a child in the cold with nothing to eat- just to get one or two "sorry" people off the line. I know a single mom like this- and it's her children who I worry about, not her poor choices. I balk at the fact that I discharge people daily who are "wrecks" but can't get disability. If they have children, it's a horror story. So do I like the net and all it brings- NO could it run better- YES. Do I want it ended? NO. And by the way, to heavier regulate it would cost more tax dollars. I believe taking care of the weak in our society is what makes the USA Great.

  • Jan 25

    Ok,

    As an ER Coordinator, I have seen a few things off in interviews, but DEAR GOD, who hurt you so?

    It almost sounds like a vent!

    I always just feel sorry for the single mom in jeans who would be wearing dress pants if she could have afforded them, if I had put up a "red flag" I would have turned down one heck of a ER Tech, who is now a ER RN, One of "OUR," not "My" best on staff.

    These judgemental posts about how I am sooooooo much better than you because I follow the book to a "T," and "conform to the upper-crust of this Profession" sound so shallow and "God-complex" like.

    Some of the greatest minds out there have hair just like Einstien, or decided to get a tattoo, and I cannot begin to imagine how you differentiate on your patient care according to how they are dressed-or look.

    I think you missed your calling for cosmotologist, or a prissy hair dresser!

    Otherwise, I hope you work in a private, small, uptown hospital where you won't be ashamed by Wrangler wearing blue collar workers, but doubt that since you had to post a vent about hair washing, denim, and piercings!

    Old School is Okay, but Compassion, Understanding, and Empathy are still character traits that I would rather see than starch constipated china doll nurses!

    Thanks!

    Kyle

  • Jan 13

    I think Nursing Elders (meant with total respect as in "Seniority") ought to be given the position of higher respect during a shift, than "just one of the players on a team. Think about, every other Profession gets better with time, Educators have Tenure, Law and Military have ranks, Even the Post Office treats their Elder Employees with status for time spent with the USPS!

    Please don't misrepresent what I am saying when I say I don't expect a 55 year old women to be able to lift a 200lb patient off the floor, or restrain a 6ft combative patient (though there are 60somethings working circles around me.) What they offer is soooooo much more than braun! Things that scare me on a EKG, they have dreamed about more times than I have seen it, many more could have auscultated the ar/dys-rhytmias!! It just doesn't seem fair to expect them to do the same when they could offer much more valuable things to the incoming and younger nurses.

    They have put in their time in the trenches, most sacrificing their good backs, knees, and posture in the mix. Where is their real tangible reward for all that work, all those years of advancing technology they kept up with, they ushered in the computer to healthcare that was waiting on us, better equipment, and don't even get me started on what I've learned they put up with- so we wouldn't have to.

    If their only reward is trying to keep up with the influx of 20somethings willing to take any opening out there, and returning salaries to base, higher ratios, and longer workdays plus Overtime Requirements without the stature, tenure, and respect they so honestly deserve- what have we to look forward too? What will our post look like in 20 more years?

    So, I know it's really lousy, and worth truly nothing- but thank you from the bottom of my heart. Everything I love about my job, RN being part of my "Identity," and the modest paycheck is all you guys!! It really ought to be different!!!

    Also, for all the "Nurses eat their young," I have yet to come across a post stating, "Nursing throws their Elders under the bus," That says something about your character, strength, and poise.

    I am totally unworthy, but I "know" that. I hope one day to aspire to your value, knowledge base, and maybe if I'm lucky even join the "Crusty Bat Society," or the "Upper Crust" may be a better name

  • Jan 12

    Wow, there is this predominance in the nursing profession to get a strong foundation in Med-Surg nursing before venturing out to see what else is out there, . . .

    Interesting thought, . .

    Are Doctors required to go through 1-4 years of being a general practitioner?

    I THINK IT DEPENDS ON THE PERSON, THE ENVIRONMENT, DESIRE, and DRIVE/MATURITY

  • Aug 26 '17

    I got this one!

    You are looking at a 5 year recovered nurse who was dumb enough during the peak of my addiction, to walk right in and pee a positive screen for opioids!

    Like Meriwhen said, usually a prescription (like I had) would have sufficed. But, because I didn't disclose that before testing- I bombed it, and received just enough confirmation that I was in a problem bigger than me, devastated because I realized I was not just an addict- but a full blown "functional" Junkie, and embarrassed beyond what you (if it wasn't your screen) will ever understand.

    They didn't call the board, though I now wish they had- I would have been immediately and "compassionately" referred to treatment, but, if there's a harder way to do something, I can usually find it.

    I tried 3 days of withdrawals before going to to the ER in desperation, where I was treated like a piece of dirt, (tried to give me Ativan, which I refused- didn't need a Benzo addiction!) The MD actually said I was wasting his time- this wasn't a rehab! "What do you want me to do, write you some Hydrocodone or Dilaudid until you can get a bed?" Really? I had plenty of dope. "No, I thought people could detox in hospitals without the horrible withdrawals." "If it's been three days, you ought to feel better soon, you want something for your nerves, . . .I mean, that's all I can do for ya!" "Ok, just discharge me, I should have stayed at home." "I agree!" I must say that he came to my 3rd Year Sobriety Reception and thoroughly apologized- I later found out he was struggling with Rx addiction at that time, he's now an addictionologist, and runs a Suboxone Detox Program.

    So, hopeless, and feeling like I had super-influenza- and sure I would probably end-it-all that night, I went in to my State Board of Nursing that next day sweaty, shaky, and exhausted. I was expecting to tell them I was an Opioid Addict, tell them what happened, and give them my license. I was expecting them to berate me, humiliate me further(if possible), and tell me my nursing career was over because of my poor choices and sickening lifestyle- I remember thinking (I was only 23-4 years into Nursing), They might have me arrested for the possibility I diverted (I never did thank God!) I was an ER coordinator without Pyxis Access in prior job. I was way wrong.

    I walked in to see a sweet young African American Girl at a reception desk who said "Baby, are you lost?" I told her no ma'am, I need to speak with a Board of Nursing Rep- "I have a personal emergency."

    She lit up with a glow-"Are you here with a chemical dependency problem baby?" I felt my heart slow down, I thought I was dreaming. "Your in the right place, You want a little help?" "Yes ma'am, but I came to report myself." "Let's get you to Ms. Xxxxxx.

    They preceded to save my life, my dreams, and my career. But, even if they'd tore up my license and danced around them while they burned, I would still only be here because of them! They found me a bed at a Detox Center, a Rehab bed following that for a 90 day stay, and they introduced me to the Recovery Nurse Program. I never thought before that I would consider employees of my State Board "My Angels!"

    Now fast forward 6 years later and I am an NP who consults regularly with the same nurses at the Board, along with 3 counselors, and 3 MDs/2 DOs to help others entering those doors petrified with fear, and feeling miserable, hopeless, and bracing for the same thing I was. I am still in shock of the way they treated me like their brother had walked in and said he was "in trouble."

    I think Nurses are Awesome, and from the one there when I was born, to the Board Nurses that saved my life, I am in great debt to some awesome substance abuse Nurses! That's pretty much what happened to me. The test saved my life and BSN- maybe/hopefully (if the persons is abusing them), you witnessed a huge "turn-around" in their life.

  • Aug 24 '17

    Ok,

    As an ER Coordinator, I have seen a few things off in interviews, but DEAR GOD, who hurt you so?

    It almost sounds like a vent!

    I always just feel sorry for the single mom in jeans who would be wearing dress pants if she could have afforded them, if I had put up a "red flag" I would have turned down one heck of a ER Tech, who is now a ER RN, One of "OUR," not "My" best on staff.

    These judgemental posts about how I am sooooooo much better than you because I follow the book to a "T," and "conform to the upper-crust of this Profession" sound so shallow and "God-complex" like.

    Some of the greatest minds out there have hair just like Einstien, or decided to get a tattoo, and I cannot begin to imagine how you differentiate on your patient care according to how they are dressed-or look.

    I think you missed your calling for cosmotologist, or a prissy hair dresser!

    Otherwise, I hope you work in a private, small, uptown hospital where you won't be ashamed by Wrangler wearing blue collar workers, but doubt that since you had to post a vent about hair washing, denim, and piercings!

    Old School is Okay, but Compassion, Understanding, and Empathy are still character traits that I would rather see than starch constipated china doll nurses!

    Thanks!

    Kyle

  • Jul 20 '17

    I did it 9 years ago, from ADN, and MSN- and my best advice is coffee, 3 alarm clocks, and the rest I plead the 5th- but it can be done.

    I would also have to give TONS of credit to my wife who also worked 40 hour weeks going to get her AS-MSW. I couldn't have done it without her, and she didn't even laugh at me when she caught me in the shower with my socks on before I realized it.

    Life Happens!

    Boston

  • Jun 18 '17

    Ok,

    As an ER Coordinator, I have seen a few things off in interviews, but DEAR GOD, who hurt you so?

    It almost sounds like a vent!

    I always just feel sorry for the single mom in jeans who would be wearing dress pants if she could have afforded them, if I had put up a "red flag" I would have turned down one heck of a ER Tech, who is now a ER RN, One of "OUR," not "My" best on staff.

    These judgemental posts about how I am sooooooo much better than you because I follow the book to a "T," and "conform to the upper-crust of this Profession" sound so shallow and "God-complex" like.

    Some of the greatest minds out there have hair just like Einstien, or decided to get a tattoo, and I cannot begin to imagine how you differentiate on your patient care according to how they are dressed-or look.

    I think you missed your calling for cosmotologist, or a prissy hair dresser!

    Otherwise, I hope you work in a private, small, uptown hospital where you won't be ashamed by Wrangler wearing blue collar workers, but doubt that since you had to post a vent about hair washing, denim, and piercings!

    Old School is Okay, but Compassion, Understanding, and Empathy are still character traits that I would rather see than starch constipated china doll nurses!

    Thanks!

    Kyle

  • Jun 13 '17

    "DON'T SWEAT THE PETTY STUFF!"
    ". . .AND DON'T PET THE SWEATY STUFF!"

  • May 3 '17

    I agree, there is enough grief and pain in one lifetime to prevent the invitation of anymore- if you've been sober without any relapse issues for greater than 5 years and they don't know it, that's a blessing! Count it as one- and lay low

    You see, time passed means nothing really from their perspective. To them, an addict is a pickle. A pickle once was a cucumber- but no matter what you do, it's never going back to being a cucumber again. You and me are "pickles." We are just clean pickles that can be pickled again anytime. You are ahead of the game if they see you as a "cucumber" still- I wouldn't go looking for dill, vinegar, and a mason jar(sorry, terrible analogy).

    That is a ghost that can haunt your career and lifestyle more than you ever imagined if the BON does not already know your past. I live in that very real haunted present- even with near 5 years clean, and no diversion history or occupational related incidences.



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