Latest Comments by edcampbe

edcampbe 1,933 Views

Joined Nov 19, '04. Posts: 72 (6% Liked) Likes: 7

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  • 1
    kohdahbears likes this.

    I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but I wouldn't expect to start out immediately in a level I trauma center in Portland. Unfortunately, there is no nursing shortage in Portland so many of the specialties in nursing are not available to new graduate nurses.

    With that said, I would inquire about jobs and apply early if are intent on working directly in trauma/ER. I know Legacy offers residency positions for their trauma program, but these spots are highly competitive.

    Good luck! Which school are you graduating from?

  • 4
    kitnaw, lindarn, CaLLaCoDe, and 1 other like this.

    Starting in January 2008, the base pay for an RN with no experience working day shift will be just over $28 / hr at Providence Portland Medical Center. The other Providence hospitals in the Portland metro area are comparable. I believe evening differential is $2.25 / hr and night differential is $5.00 / hr. You get $1.00 / hr for working weekends. However, if you opt to work every weekend you get $10.00 / hr for each weekend day you work.

    - Evan

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    My best clinical experiences were St. V's orthopedics floor (my first rotation in nursing school - 2006) and the cardiac ICU at Providence Portland Medical Center (2007). Worst clinical experience by a long shot was my pediatrics rotation at Doernbecher Children's Hospital at OHSU (2006) - I loved the facilities, the patient population, but the nursing staff was burned out and treated students like dirt.

  • 1
    smk1 likes this.

    I would agree that OHSU has a strong track record; however, they have not been impressive in recent years in their undergrad BSN program. In fact, look at the latest startling NCLEX pass rates for schools in the Portland area for the past year. http://www.oregon.gov/OSBN/pdfs/passrates.pdf OHSU had a dismal 80% pass rate last year. I strongly believe that U of P is one of the best BSN programs in Oregon right now. We have strong NCLEX pass rates and the students generally perform well in clinical settings.

    - Evan

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    My wife and I both had 265 questions and passed. We took the exam 5/10/2007 and found out this afternoon (about 24 hours later) via our state's board of nursing website were our license numbers were listed.

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    See the link above to the University of Portland's website. Each year Providence Health & Services offers a number of scholarships to the University of Portland that covers tuition for your BSN in return of a 3-year work commitment. A couple of us on this forum (myself included) are Providence Scholars. It is a wonderful program!

  • 0

    There are definitely a lot of students in my class who finance their education at U of P. If your choice is to attend nursing school at U of P and finance your education or not attend nursing school at all, I'd definitely recommend the former. However, if you are accepted to another school that makes more fiscal sense (i.e. it is much less expensive), I would consider not attending U of P. Don't get me wrong, I think the education at U of P is top notch and worth the money. Remember that private universities typically offer significant financial aid, so I'd wait and see what kind of financial aid package you get until you make your final decision with school. Best of luck!

    - Evan

  • 0

    Hey KrisPDX,

    It seems Providence was advertising about 75 Providence scholarships for both the May and August classes when I applied (there are about 140 combined students in these cohorts); however, I don't think we have more than 40-50 Providence scholars between both the May and August graduating classes. I've heard they are not offering as many scholarships this year, but you'd probably know more about that than I do.

    - Evan

  • 0

    Just a quick clarification on the "tax issue" related to the Providence Scholars program. Tuition at University of Portland for two years + a summer session (nursing school at University of Portland is 5 semesters) costs over $50,000. While you're in school you get a tax credit of $1500 as technically the Providence Scholar money is paid in loan form. When you're done with school Providence credits your paycheck with $500 every two weeks and immediately deducts the money from the same pay check (they do this for three years until your commitment with Providence is complete and the "loan" is paid). You end up paying about $200-$300 extra in taxes a month. However, keep in mind you'll be making minimally $4400 a month at Providence before taxes (this assumes you're working day shift...add $900 more a month if you expect to work night shift). When it's all said and done you end up paying about $7500 in taxes over three years work at Providence. Keep in mind you get $3000 in tax credits while you're in school, so you're really only paying about $4500 total with the Providence Scholars program.

    Now if I told you you could go to University of Portland, I'd give you a guaranteed job after graduation, and you only had to pay $4500 for two years of education...how could you not choose this option?

    If you took out loans for University of Portland ($50,000) you would pay about $500-$600 a month for 10 years to repay the money ...

    - Evan

  • 0

    Good luck with everything. PM me if you have any more questions regarding the Prov Scholars program of U of P in general.

    - Evan

  • 0

    Tofutti,

    Fortunately, my wife and I (both Prov Scholars) were placed in specialties we hoped to work in. Several Prov Scholars were not able to be placed in their specialties, but have the option of transferring to a different job within Providence after only 6 months of employment.

    - Evan

  • 0

    Hello,

    I'm a Providence Scholar who will be graduating from U of P in four weeks! I only applied to U of P when I was interested in nursing school and have not for a second regretted my decision. The faculty is great, the education is top notch, we have dedicated education units (the nurses want students and have completed a preceptor training class at U of P), and the Providence Scholars program + U of P will cover all of your tuition. U of P implemented new testing standards two years ago to better prepare students for NCLEX. Since the inception of the new NCLEX-prep exams, our classes have graduated with 98.6% and 100% first time pass rates on the NCLEX. Good luck to all of you applying to nursing school, but definitely choose U of P if you are fortunate enough to be accepted -- you won't regret it.

    - Evan

  • 0

    snowshooz,

    i hear over and over again on this board that diploma nurses or adns may have more clinical experience than the run-of-the-mill bsn nurse. in response to your comment of feeling bad for some bsns i would like to propose a counter argument. while it may be true that some bsns do not receive the same number of clinical hours than diploma or adn nurses while in nursing school -- what about the invaluable education bsns receive in research, evidence-based practice, and leadership?

    imagine a bsn who has hundreds of hours fewer clinical experiences compared to a diploma or adn nurse after graduation. how long will it take the bsn to reach a comparable level of competence in the workplace? six months, maybe even one year? however, once both nurses are on par with their nursing skills and judgment, who will be the one most likely to better nursing practice by utilizing research which can evoke positive change?

  • 0

    I see that several of you were accepted to Anesthesia school (or at least granted an interview) with sub-3.3 GPAs. What kind of science GPA did you all have, and which courses were factored into your science GPA?

    Also, what is generally considered a "good" GPA? I know there is not a distinct cut-off; however, those of you who have experience with applying to Anesthesia schools might have a ball park idea.

  • 0

    i'm curious to hear from those who have applied or been accepted to nurse anesthesia programs on what the average applicant's science grades look like. i know that there is no single answer for this, but i'm look for a range. i have a pretty good cumulative gpa (3.6-3.7); however, my science grades aren't phenomenal: a&p i and ii = a and a b, microbiology = b, pathophysiology = b, pharmacology = b, general biology i and ii = b and a b, general chemistry i = b, general physics i = b, and calculus i = a.

    i took general biology, chemistry, and physics as electives while i was completing my b.s. in computer science. i'm not sure if these classes will be a factor in computing my science gpa. can anybody give me an idea of which classes nurse anesthesia programs will factor into my science gpa? would it be worthwhile to retake any of these classes? should i not retake any classes and just try my hand at getting accepted as my grades stand now? thanks!


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