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Palliative Care, DNP 15,041 Views

Joined Jun 28, '11. Palliative Care, DNP is a DNP, FNP. She has 'Since 2009' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Family Nurse Practitioner'. Posts: 766 (55% Liked) Likes: 1,899

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  • Jan 14

    Every patient that I order opioids for also has a Narcan order placed. Unless, they are comfort transitioning to hospice.

  • Jan 14

    Every patient that I order opioids for also has a Narcan order placed. Unless, they are comfort transitioning to hospice.

  • Jan 6

    I just graduated with my DNP. What I have been told in the job search is that RN experience doesn't count. A new graduate NP is just that a new graduate.

  • Dec 16 '17

    Is quality even a factor in your equation or are you really just looking for the fastest route? Not saying Vanderbilt would not be quality education. My point as a current FNP student is I want to make sure I am prepared not rushed through then head out winging it....

  • Dec 13 '17

    Is quality even a factor in your equation or are you really just looking for the fastest route? Not saying Vanderbilt would not be quality education. My point as a current FNP student is I want to make sure I am prepared not rushed through then head out winging it....

  • Dec 13 '17

    Is quality even a factor in your equation or are you really just looking for the fastest route? Not saying Vanderbilt would not be quality education. My point as a current FNP student is I want to make sure I am prepared not rushed through then head out winging it....

  • Dec 10 '17

    Quote from Malenurse1235954
    Just my personal pet peeve. The title should ve np vs physician. Physicians shouldnt have exclusive rights on the word "Doctor," the majority of NPs are being trained at the doctorate level.

    I believe nurses often choose the wrong hill to die on. I couldn't care less if I'm never referred to as Dr. at work. I know what I have achieved. My husband is a pharrmD and doesn't use the title either.

    What do I find important? Creating one path to becoming an RN. Streamlining graduate programs. Students not being responsible for finding their own preceptors. Safe patient to nurse staffing ratios. I could keep going but the point is our profession has bigger fish to fry.

  • Nov 30 '17

    Quote from Jedrnurse
    Seems like the tone is:

    1. don't give unsolicited nursing advice (though nurses deal with wounds more than pharmacists, the pharmacist was working and the nurse was not)
    2. the pharmacist was defensive and reacted as such (personally I would classify that behavior as putz-ish)

    On another note, the winter olympics will be held in Hell the day I address a pharmacist as "Doctor."
    Just a note most pharmacists are PharmDs not PhDs. My husband has been one for 13 years. While he doesn't use the title he definitely earned it. There are nurses now being called Dr. and we should extend the same courtesy those other healthcare team members if they desire it.

  • Nov 29 '17

    I have had the same experience since working night shift. Tired all of the time no matter how much sleep I have. Beginning graduate school this year and I'm not going to work. I am really looking forward to having a normal sleep pattern again. I don't think I will ever work nights again.

  • Oct 13 '17

    Honestly, I agree there is a lot of BS in the BSN education. I also felt like there was a lot of BS in the DNP. That said, I put in the work because it was necessary to get where I wanted to go. In life, there are so many things we do simply because they are necessary. The value is determined by you. Are you where you want to be? If not put in the work.

  • Oct 12 '17

    The job market in our area is limited for women's health. I would definitely say the dual program would give you more options. The Hampton Roads area is saturated with NPs. A dual certification is make you stand out. If you end up in a rural area like the Eastern Shore you will be doing women's health in primary care.

  • Sep 28 '17

    Personally, I am of the opinion that is no one's business why you are calling in. I also worked nights and it can take a lot out of you. I don't feel like we should have to explain why we can not get to work. The important part is that you provide adequate notice so that coverage for the shift may be found. I agree with others that nursing seems to have expectations that you will work no matter the conditions. Take care of yourself because the employer is not going to look out for you.

  • Sep 25 '17

    Nurses always make the argument that we need a seat at the table or we should be seen as a career not a vocation. If that is truly what we want then in my opinion the BSN should be the single point of entry. Nursing looks disorganized when we can't even decide how to become a RN. There are still diploma programs, ADNs, & BSN programs. I started as an ADN but immediately enrolled and began an RN-BSN program directly after graduation. In my area, ADNs & Diploma RNs have deadlines to obtain the BSN so why not just make that the entry point? New graduates without a BSN are having difficulty finding acute care positions here.

  • Sep 21 '17

    Nurses always make the argument that we need a seat at the table or we should be seen as a career not a vocation. If that is truly what we want then in my opinion the BSN should be the single point of entry. Nursing looks disorganized when we can't even decide how to become a RN. There are still diploma programs, ADNs, & BSN programs. I started as an ADN but immediately enrolled and began an RN-BSN program directly after graduation. In my area, ADNs & Diploma RNs have deadlines to obtain the BSN so why not just make that the entry point? New graduates without a BSN are having difficulty finding acute care positions here.

  • Sep 18 '17

    I would like to tell you that this is only an issue with RNs. Unfortunately, during my orientation as a new NP most of the NPs & MDs training me never utilized a stethoscope. However, all charted physical assessments. I was absolutely astonished.


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