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Palliative Care, DNP 12,392 Views

Joined Jun 28, '11 - from 'Virginia'. Palliative Care, DNP is a DNP, FNP. She has 'Since 2009' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Family Nurse Practitioner'. Posts: 743 (55% Liked) Likes: 1,831

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  • Mar 29

    After years of yo yoing with my weight, I had gastric bypass. It has been an excellent choice for me. I'm down 100 lbs and it will be a year in May. It's the little things that have made me notice how much weight affected daily life. I take the steps constantly at the hospital now. I was able to keep up with a group of 8th graders in D.C. I can finally shop in the regular section. I no longer take several medications. Mostly just various vitamins. I know surgery isn't for everyone but it was a great choice for me.

  • Mar 29

    After years of yo yoing with my weight, I had gastric bypass. It has been an excellent choice for me. I'm down 100 lbs and it will be a year in May. It's the little things that have made me notice how much weight affected daily life. I take the steps constantly at the hospital now. I was able to keep up with a group of 8th graders in D.C. I can finally shop in the regular section. I no longer take several medications. Mostly just various vitamins. I know surgery isn't for everyone but it was a great choice for me.

  • Mar 26

    I attended Loyola University New Orleans. It is online but you do have to go to campus some. They give you the dates. Every semester a faculty member literally evaluates you on the clinical site. I was a difficult program but achievable. Not without issues but then every school has some.

  • Mar 24

    What drove me to become an NP? Simple FLOOR NURSING sucks and wasn't going to do that until retirement.

  • Mar 20

    Humor has a time and place as does trolling apparently. I just don't happen to see the behavior you describe as humorous. Pretending that you can not understand or hear a provider is simply obnoxious and not conducive to caring for a patient. Calling someone over to have a word then saying "quick" is a waste of my time. I have children but I don't work with them. Maybe you haven't been called out yet but if you are truly this obnoxious at work it will happen. The hospital setting is not the place to act like a 12 yr old. I would be the provider to call you out especially in my field.

  • Mar 20

    I can't for the life of me imagine a scenario where this behavior would be tolerated nor appropriate. I have never worked in an environment which would employ a nurse acting in this manner long. I am further astounded that you are bragging about your behavior and that anyone would agree. As it stands, nurses are often attempting to get a "seat at the table" with other professionals of the healthcare team. I don't recall there being a "kiddie" table at any facility I have worked at. Just wow

  • Mar 13

    Quote from Aromatic
    I do not forsee NP salaries going up in the future. More supply and lower quality graduates due to many sloppy schools, and people are catching on that many NPs are not ready for practice when they graduate, or really ever. There are some good ones though so not group bashing here.

    ^^^This! I was less than thrilled to discover my new partner in palliative care earned her degree through a for profit, completely online, and no supervision aka Degrees For Everyone U

  • Mar 11

    Quote from Davey Do
    I find it interesting that Avid reader has not posted in a couple of days, though she has been lurking around at least a couple of times.

    I note this only because I find people's behavior, and in this case, Avid reader's, to be extremely interesting. One moment she's "all up in your face" and the next minute she's scurrying around like a little rat.

    What gives?

    Simply put a troll stirring the pot. Probably planning the next post to create a ruckus

  • Mar 11

    Humor has a time and place as does trolling apparently. I just don't happen to see the behavior you describe as humorous. Pretending that you can not understand or hear a provider is simply obnoxious and not conducive to caring for a patient. Calling someone over to have a word then saying "quick" is a waste of my time. I have children but I don't work with them. Maybe you haven't been called out yet but if you are truly this obnoxious at work it will happen. The hospital setting is not the place to act like a 12 yr old. I would be the provider to call you out especially in my field.

  • Mar 11

    I can't for the life of me imagine a scenario where this behavior would be tolerated nor appropriate. I have never worked in an environment which would employ a nurse acting in this manner long. I am further astounded that you are bragging about your behavior and that anyone would agree. As it stands, nurses are often attempting to get a "seat at the table" with other professionals of the healthcare team. I don't recall there being a "kiddie" table at any facility I have worked at. Just wow

  • Feb 28

    Quote from WoundcarePhilRN
    When did we ever depart from the Haves & have nots?
    That is true but in my experience it was less pronounced under ACA. In my clinical rotations through primary care the last few years we definitely had many more patients that had not been seen in years. They were able to be seen directly as a result of the ACA. As difficult as it is to imagine there were many grateful patients. Enrollment was up when mentioned on the news recently. Yes, the ACA does need work but there are people that were genuinely assisted. Two of the offices I was at had a dedicated ACA representative onsite to assist people.

  • Feb 27

    Just a typical day for me. I hear this multiple times a day. It doesn't necessarily mean the family is in denial. It does mean they aren't ready for the discussion. Forcing the discussion only makes them stop listening. Meet them where they are. Listen. Be empathetic. Families will start asking questions when there is a change or when they are ready. As mentioned above, most folks think we are the Reaper. Palliative does not mean no Care nor Hospice. We also manage chronic illnesses such as MS, ALS, & Sickle Cell etc.

  • Feb 27

    Just a typical day for me. I hear this multiple times a day. It doesn't necessarily mean the family is in denial. It does mean they aren't ready for the discussion. Forcing the discussion only makes them stop listening. Meet them where they are. Listen. Be empathetic. Families will start asking questions when there is a change or when they are ready. As mentioned above, most folks think we are the Reaper. Palliative does not mean no Care nor Hospice. We also manage chronic illnesses such as MS, ALS, & Sickle Cell etc.

  • Feb 24

    This will be highly unpopular but here goes anyway. I worked night shift and I did not go in if the roads were not cleared. I also live in an area that is unprepared for snow. Does that mean someone else had to stay? Maybe but too bad I have stayed many times for hurricanes that came through when others couldn't come in. My 4 kids need their mom and I am not risking driving in severe weather and not being here for them. I don't care about other people's opinions because they do not pay my bills or take care of my family.

  • Feb 21

    Just a typical day for me. I hear this multiple times a day. It doesn't necessarily mean the family is in denial. It does mean they aren't ready for the discussion. Forcing the discussion only makes them stop listening. Meet them where they are. Listen. Be empathetic. Families will start asking questions when there is a change or when they are ready. As mentioned above, most folks think we are the Reaper. Palliative does not mean no Care nor Hospice. We also manage chronic illnesses such as MS, ALS, & Sickle Cell etc.


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