Latest Likes For Mom To 4, DNP-FNP

Latest Likes For Mom To 4, DNP-FNP

Mom To 4, DNP-FNP, DNP 9,749 Views

Joined Jun 28, '11 - from 'Virginia'. Mom To 4, DNP-FNP is a DNP, FNP. She has 'Since 2009' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Family Nurse Practitioner'. Posts: 650 (52% Liked) Likes: 1,488

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  • Jul 19

    I tell my children if they are interested in healthcare to be anything but the nurse. Pharmacist, PT, OT, PA, Physician, Respiratory, or whatever else. Nurses work long hours with little to no breaks or respect, often short staffed, and the buck ends with them. Ice not cold enough? Nurse's fault. 602 did not get Dilaudid exactly 2 hrs from last dose? Nurse's fault. No CNAs today so patients were in filth longer? Nurse's fault. The nurse is at the bottom of the hill with arms wide open and we all know what rolls downhill. I graduate with my DNP in May because I was so fed up with patient satisfaction & the Burger King drive thru mentality.

  • Jul 19

    I tell my children if they are interested in healthcare to be anything but the nurse. Pharmacist, PT, OT, PA, Physician, Respiratory, or whatever else. Nurses work long hours with little to no breaks or respect, often short staffed, and the buck ends with them. Ice not cold enough? Nurse's fault. 602 did not get Dilaudid exactly 2 hrs from last dose? Nurse's fault. No CNAs today so patients were in filth longer? Nurse's fault. The nurse is at the bottom of the hill with arms wide open and we all know what rolls downhill. I graduate with my DNP in May because I was so fed up with patient satisfaction & the Burger King drive thru mentality.

  • Jul 19

    I tell my children if they are interested in healthcare to be anything but the nurse. Pharmacist, PT, OT, PA, Physician, Respiratory, or whatever else. Nurses work long hours with little to no breaks or respect, often short staffed, and the buck ends with them. Ice not cold enough? Nurse's fault. 602 did not get Dilaudid exactly 2 hrs from last dose? Nurse's fault. No CNAs today so patients were in filth longer? Nurse's fault. The nurse is at the bottom of the hill with arms wide open and we all know what rolls downhill. I graduate with my DNP in May because I was so fed up with patient satisfaction & the Burger King drive thru mentality.

  • Jul 17

    Quote from Jedrnurse
    Seems like the tone is:

    1. don't give unsolicited nursing advice (though nurses deal with wounds more than pharmacists, the pharmacist was working and the nurse was not)
    2. the pharmacist was defensive and reacted as such (personally I would classify that behavior as putz-ish)

    On another note, the winter olympics will be held in Hell the day I address a pharmacist as "Doctor."
    Just a note most pharmacists are PharmDs not PhDs. My husband has been one for 13 years. While he doesn't use the title he definitely earned it. There are nurses now being called Dr. and we should extend the same courtesy those other healthcare team members if they desire it.

  • Jul 13
  • Jul 7

    In 2009, I had a job lined up prior to graduation in southwest VA. The next year in 2010 the graduating nurses couldn't find a job for 6 or more months. I was truly fortunate that there was still such a nerd when I finished.

  • Jul 6

    I had lap band converted to gastric bypass 5/25. Today I'm 28lbs lighter and it's only been a month. So I can see how weight loss surgery can produce 50 lbs in 90 days. I'm not certain that I could be that successful dieting. This surgery had been very educational for me. The way that you have to progress into eating makes you realize how much eating is psychological versus hunger. Sweets and sugars are automatically out of the diet and cause Dumping Syndrome so are avoided. The foods that I used to love & crave are no longer of interest. The cravings and food addictions are gone. I am able to introduce exercise again tomorrow. This is a lifestyle change that is maintainable for me as I do not feel deprived. Diets in general were never maintainable for me. Everyone needs to find a program that they are able to maintain.

  • Jul 4

    I just graduated from a 4 year BSN-DNP program. If I were starting today I would go the PA route. I like their curriculum over ours and the fact that they do receive general training. Many are hired in specialties where they make more money. I feel my curriculum had many courses that will never help me in practice. I graduated with 1200 clinical hours in placements that I had to find myself. That is another point, PAs do not find their own placement for clinicals. Many students become desperate for a preceptor that they accept anyone that says yes. That does not mean they will receive the best clinical experience just that the hours will be completed.

  • Jul 1

    I started an RN to BSN program the same month I graduated from my ADN program. Not because I felt it was better but because I realized it was the only way to move up or get into graduate school. I honestly feel like the courses to complete the BSN were crap. Nursing theory being the worst and most useless. However, without those courses and that degree, I would not have my DNP now. The one thing that's consistent with nursing education is that the higher the degree the more useless courses.

  • Jul 1

    I started an RN to BSN program the same month I graduated from my ADN program. Not because I felt it was better but because I realized it was the only way to move up or get into graduate school. I honestly feel like the courses to complete the BSN were crap. Nursing theory being the worst and most useless. However, without those courses and that degree, I would not have my DNP now. The one thing that's consistent with nursing education is that the higher the degree the more useless courses.

  • Jun 22

    Quote from Jedrnurse
    Seems like the tone is:

    1. don't give unsolicited nursing advice (though nurses deal with wounds more than pharmacists, the pharmacist was working and the nurse was not)
    2. the pharmacist was defensive and reacted as such (personally I would classify that behavior as putz-ish)

    On another note, the winter olympics will be held in Hell the day I address a pharmacist as "Doctor."
    Just a note most pharmacists are PharmDs not PhDs. My husband has been one for 13 years. While he doesn't use the title he definitely earned it. There are nurses now being called Dr. and we should extend the same courtesy those other healthcare team members if they desire it.

  • Jun 18

    Quote from Jedrnurse
    Seems like the tone is:

    1. don't give unsolicited nursing advice (though nurses deal with wounds more than pharmacists, the pharmacist was working and the nurse was not)
    2. the pharmacist was defensive and reacted as such (personally I would classify that behavior as putz-ish)

    On another note, the winter olympics will be held in Hell the day I address a pharmacist as "Doctor."
    Just a note most pharmacists are PharmDs not PhDs. My husband has been one for 13 years. While he doesn't use the title he definitely earned it. There are nurses now being called Dr. and we should extend the same courtesy those other healthcare team members if they desire it.

  • Jun 17

    Quote from sailornurse
    There are only about 22 states that have independent practice.
    I know but Virginia really has quite a good old boy network. The Board of Medicine successfully holds back independent practice annually. It's up every year and either shuffled to the next year or flat out rejected.

  • Jun 17

    Your article is about the Veteran's Administration (VA) passing independent practice. As for Virginia it was shot down again this year. We may be one of the last states.

  • Jun 16

    Quote from Jedrnurse
    Seems like the tone is:

    1. don't give unsolicited nursing advice (though nurses deal with wounds more than pharmacists, the pharmacist was working and the nurse was not)
    2. the pharmacist was defensive and reacted as such (personally I would classify that behavior as putz-ish)

    On another note, the winter olympics will be held in Hell the day I address a pharmacist as "Doctor."
    Just a note most pharmacists are PharmDs not PhDs. My husband has been one for 13 years. While he doesn't use the title he definitely earned it. There are nurses now being called Dr. and we should extend the same courtesy those other healthcare team members if they desire it.


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