Latest Comments by newnursejoan

newnursejoan 1,360 Views

Joined Jun 26, '11. Posts: 65 (28% Liked) Likes: 22

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    Hello Marie, remember to manage your time wisely. This is the most important tip anyone can give you so study consistently each day of the week no matter what nursing school you attend. Although this is quite obvious, nursing is very hard work and it is easy to fall behind because you have to juggle your classes with your practicum. Start on the first day of school and remind yourself everyday. This is the tip to success, and a lot of new graduates forget this. Not staying on top of your readings even for a week can get you into some hot water!

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    Its usually 4-6 weeks from the examination date!

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    results have historically taken about 5-6 weeks. If the other provinces are receiving their results now, I would take that as a sign that results for Ontario shall be coming shortly. Good luck to everyone!

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    If you have the College of Nurses of Ontario they will be able to assess your education and experience and will be able to give you an answer based on their assessments. Their website is College of Nurses of Ontario

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    Hi Toronto Nurse, what has the passing mark for the CPNRE typically have been in the past. 56 percent seems rather low

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    Kadm1 likes this.

    Yeah I have to agree. Although the exam may be in fact divided into components reflecting differing areas of nursing practice, it is evenly marked from what I understand and the passing mark reflects the number of write or wrong answers.

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    Although I did not complete a PN program, I did complete the collaborative RN program at Ryerson, George Brown, Centennial College. I have heard lots of good things about their clinical components. Just remember to be on top of your pathophysiology, nursing practice skills, and knowledge pertaining to medication administration. You will doing this will really help you feel more successful in the clinical setting. Be prepared, but I'm sure the instructors will pump this ideology into you once the program starts.

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    Fiona59 likes this.

    Yes I agree, medication administration is typically a component of a diploma or degree program, and usually integrated into their nursing practice component. If you are totally set on taking a course, I would suggest you contact an accredited college such as George Brown College or Centennial College and speak to someone in their nursing departments. Sometimes these schools offer adult learning courses for nurses who have been out of practice for some time to supplement and refresh their knowledge set.

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    I've used a couple of CRNE preparation books including Mosby's and Lippincotts. I think the benefit of Mosbys is that they provide some pathology and not just questions. I think the best CRNE preparation book is your medical surgical book in my opinion. Use this as your base book, and use the other CRNE books just as supplements.

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    Mdyshaik786 and Fiona59 like this.

    I think that in finding a good nursing school, you should really look at the clinical component. What I mean is inquire about the clinical program. What kind of rotations are students required to undergo in the program. How much clinical practice will be integrated into each semester. What units will students get experience in? I would go with a school that provides students with lots of opportunities to gain first hand clinical experience in the practice setting. Doing theoretical courses is just not enough, you need to get your hands dirty! I have heard that a lot of students say that the 2 year condensed programs that are being offered to students with previous degrees really do not provide enough clinical experience. Now I did a 4 year degree at Ryerson University, which I found was pretty good. Is it the best, I can't say that, but I have heard lots of good things about it. Start off with doing research about the nursing degree programs in your area, and compare the clinical components. Thats a good start I think.

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    There are lots of classes, this is true. There are lots of threads on allnurses, so I would just suggest that you do a search and you will find lots of relevant information. I failed and took a class at the Toronto School of Nursing, which I found to be extremely useful. All their instructors are Registered Nurses, who can give you lots of clinical examples. You can find them at The RN and RPN exam prep review - CRNE and CPNRE prep course review - Limited spaces!!! - Home. I personally felt lost after failing, because I had really felt that I studied quite a bit and to be honest with you was an honour role student at school, so it worked for me. If you are looking for a shorter course, you can get one at http://www.primededucation.ca/ which typically offer a shorter 2 day review. These have usually been held at universities in downtown Toronto. Then there is also PASS Nurse Homepage which is offered at George Brown College and again a two day workshop from last time I checked. You have to remember though, don't be fooled that you can take one of these classes without studying. I took it because I felt lost after failing and didn't know where to start, and found that them really helpful in guiding me in terms of where to study, and what to study, as well as questions daily, etc. That said, you have to start studying on your own, which in my opinion is the best solution to passing. Make a daily schedule and stick to it. Anyways stay positive and keep focused and you can do it!

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    DalNursie likes this.

    good luck to all the CRNE writers tomorrow. I have been there and made it and you can too! Be positive and hopefully all of the hard studying has paid off!

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    Check your schools continuing education department and see which of the electives you are taking is offered in the summer. Then take that course in the summer!

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    From what I understand, in Ontario once you fail the CRNE, and you are working on a temporary license as a new graduate, you have your license revoked and are not able to work. I'm not sure if you are an Internationally trained nurse, if this is different. Best bet would be to contact the cno.org

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    Although I agree you won't have to likely do anything extra, the best bet is to contact the CNO. They would be able to provide you with the best advice


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