Latest Likes For Fiona59

Fiona59 42,833 Views

Joined Oct 9, '04. She has 'Ten plus' year(s) of experience. Posts: 8,336 (39% Liked) Likes: 9,065

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • Sep 21

    Well, in my hospital post partum is a separate unit from L&D, so the nurses don't cross the floor lines.

    Post partum is busy. Well, depends on the birth rate in your area and if you are a regional centre. Lots of teaching, lots of paperwork.

    We started the shift with ten patients (5 mums, 5 babies) discharge them, get fresh deliveries. Our unit allocates you x number of rooms (we have semi's). During the shift it depends on how fast your beds are filled. I've heard of shifts where nurses have charted on over 20 patients on their 8 hour shift.

    You need a thick skin and not focus on the babies. Ours is also an inner city hospital, so you have addicts delivering and are responsible for the urine catches on the newborns, we have babies apprehended on a regular basis by the province. Can you handle telling a 15yo Mum that the government has taken her child into care? Our nothern territories send their multiples and high risk deliveries south, we are the regional centre. So, lots of different cultures and languages.

    The hostile Mum who had her "birth plan" not go her way due to an emergency. I remember one who verbally abused her husband so badly, the hospital social worker was called in.

    There is no such thing as a typical day in nursing. Especially on postpartum. I've heard of fights between the grannies, various candidates for fatherhood arriving to meet their new offspring (security loved that one, almost like a Jerry Springer show), professional athletes spouses delivering who think the sun rises and sets by their needs. Working with a mum who has lost one twin and safely delivered the other. Working with a woman who's first delivery will be her only delivery due to an emergency c-section with horrible complications.

    You just learn to roll with the flow and hope for a good shift. You learn not to laugh when you hear some of the new names and spellings the child is being saddled with.

    Usually, the post partum nurses are older. Ours are mainly over 40 and never leave. Maybe two vacancies a year.

  • Sep 20

    By any chance are you a Freeman of the Land?

    You've already admitted to wanting a subsidized education. A heavily subsidized one by the time you finish that NP that talk about in another thread.

    You don't see anything wrong in the Canadian taxpayer helping you get the education that you then plan on using to flee to the US?

    America? Please take him. There seems to be no compassion in this individual and "the me and mine first" mentality is strong.

  • Sep 19

    I suffered a serious injury because a devoted daughter wouldn't step out while four of us were caring for her father. I have a permanent reminder daily of the need to have space to work in.

    I don't come to their job sites and hang around to make sure they do their job well. Just give me space and safety to do mine.

  • Sep 19

    Rooming in with Mum is the norm in my area.

    Nursery Nurses gave the first bath, monitored babes who's Mum's were off unit for tests or to smoke (don't be judgmental), or were just plain exhausted. The NN was also responsible for doing the car seat monitoring, monitoring jaundiced babes under the lights, etc.

    Yes there were moments to hold and rock, but some parents don't want you to do it.

    "be tended to" that's Mum's job.

  • Sep 19

    I once explained the difference between LPNs and RNs in terms that people could understand. I live in a military town. LPN = enlisted. RN = officer.

    Both roles/ranks valuable. Many skills overlap.

  • Sep 16

    Things to consider:

    Are you fluent in oral and written medical Italian

    Do you have EU citizenship

    European nurses aren't paid as well as North American nurses

  • Sep 15

    Ours just tell us they are going for a smoke and off they go. We get the odd one who thinks a nurse should go with them to open doors and push their wheelchairs. We just tell them that if they want to smoke they go under their own steam.

    We do have a smoking cessation programme that we offer them (patches, gum, inhalers) but most decline it.

    We can't refuse to let them off the unit, they are patients nor prisoners. They are mainly adults who can make their own decisions.

    Tobacco is heavily taxed and who are we to say no?

  • Sep 13

    I suffered a serious injury because a devoted daughter wouldn't step out while four of us were caring for her father. I have a permanent reminder daily of the need to have space to work in.

    I don't come to their job sites and hang around to make sure they do their job well. Just give me space and safety to do mine.

  • Sep 12

    I once explained the difference between LPNs and RNs in terms that people could understand. I live in a military town. LPN = enlisted. RN = officer.

    Both roles/ranks valuable. Many skills overlap.

  • Sep 12

    Text speak. RU h8trz rding this?

    Would you chart in text? Then don't expect us to read it here!

    Especially if you are ranting that LPNs aren't real nurses and you are pre-nursing major (I mean what in hades is pre-nursing?)

  • Sep 12

    Yes, you are in for a very interesting time if indeed you are going into a Canadian nursing programme.

    If you are a Canadian, you have taken advantage of universal healthcare (which is different from socialized healthcare) all of your life. Your children and partner have used it. You have received a heavily subsidized education for both your philosophy degree and now the nursing programme you are about to enter.

    Do you accept child tax credits? I didn't receive any because our combined income said we didn't need it, so in effect I've been subsidizing you and your family for years.

    How will you deal with working with people who know how to work the system? I work in an inner city facility and trust me many members of the inner city know to the last dime what they are entitled to.

    In your philosophy studies did you ever encounter the concept of "the greater good"?

  • Sep 11

    I once explained the difference between LPNs and RNs in terms that people could understand. I live in a military town. LPN = enlisted. RN = officer.

    Both roles/ranks valuable. Many skills overlap.

  • Sep 11

    Quote from Tetra
    This forum is hilarious though, I literally no nothing about nursing, I'm 1 week in... One of our classes was on cultural diversity, and inclusivity. It was fantastic actually.

    The irony is how I've been treated by many on this forum who apparently know more than me. I'm not upset, it's just funny. The intolerance is strong with this group:

    "Don't get into nursing."
    "Don't come to the USA"
    "happy to be on the doll"
    "we don't need people like you."

    Should I write everything that's been said about me here? I could go on...

    I mean, I can't even make this stuff up.
    Why are you on a doll? Don't you have a real partner?

  • Sep 11

    Quote from companisbiki
    I don't recommend you going into Canadian nursing as we do provide care on the basis that healthcare is a right for everyone. If you want to pick and choose who has the right to receive healthcare, then maybe consider countries that have same ideals as you do (many third world countries perhaps). If you do decide to go to Canada, find out if you and your family opt out of their public provincial healthcare insurance system because clearly it goes against your beliefs, and you would certainly be paying into something you might not benefit from immediately. It would be interesting to find out if your opinion would change after experiencing what Canada's social system is really like...
    He lives in Ontario and happily admits to using provincial healthcare, collecting child tax credits, etc, because he's paid in. He also claims to have lived "below the poverty line" for most of his life.

    He fails to understand that we've all been subsidizing his family by paying our share of taxes.

  • Sep 11

    But he wants to be a NP as fast as possible! So he can move to the US.

    SEems to have no problem using Canadian tax money to fund his education, health care, and income. He's got children, so his family will receive monthly cheques for child tax benefits. Unless he has a load of scholarships, he'll be using The federal and provincial student loan programmes.

    I'm going to be blunt. He's a user and a troll


close