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Fiona59 41,675 Views

Joined Oct 9, '04. She has 'Ten plus' year(s) of experience. Posts: 8,267 (39% Liked) Likes: 8,863

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  • Jul 23

    I had a quick look at OPs posting history.

    She's in Canada. It's the norm up here to get 3-5 shifts for orientation unless you are hired in a specialty such as Dialysis, NICU, ICU, etc.

    Orientation is used as a time to learn the routines of the unit, the flow of the shift, and documentation. For casuals, it is often two shifts per unit they are being oriented to. Usually, new hire casuals are orientated to two units on the same service, so it work out to four days of Ortho.

    OP also mentions she's been licensed in two provinces, so that's where I think most of her difficulties would arise. Every province is different in how they do things.

    My facility uses a combo of computer and paper charting. Meds are all computer recorded while care is long hand. The chart sections are clearly marked and it's very easy to follow.

  • Jul 23

    I had a quick look at OPs posting history.

    She's in Canada. It's the norm up here to get 3-5 shifts for orientation unless you are hired in a specialty such as Dialysis, NICU, ICU, etc.

    Orientation is used as a time to learn the routines of the unit, the flow of the shift, and documentation. For casuals, it is often two shifts per unit they are being oriented to. Usually, new hire casuals are orientated to two units on the same service, so it work out to four days of Ortho.

    OP also mentions she's been licensed in two provinces, so that's where I think most of her difficulties would arise. Every province is different in how they do things.

    My facility uses a combo of computer and paper charting. Meds are all computer recorded while care is long hand. The chart sections are clearly marked and it's very easy to follow.

  • Jul 23

    Hell, yes. You are ancient. I'm surprised someone of your advanced age is even contemplating new adventures

  • Jul 22

    Quote from MPKH
    I work in a hospital that serves the downtown and inner city area of the city I live in. IVDU patients aren't a foreign specimen to me. If there is no clinical reason to hold an opiate (or any drug, really), I give it, providing that the patient's mentation and overall status is adequate.

    Because of the high population of IVDU patients we get, there is a group of clinicians specializing in treating pain in people with addiction in my hospital, as well as helping people rehabilitate. That program is a godsend to us nurses.
    Let's celebrate our inner city pride! ARCH!

  • Jul 22

    Hell, yes. You are ancient. I'm surprised someone of your advanced age is even contemplating new adventures

  • Jul 21

    Quote from canadawali
    You can talk to your manager and justify why you think you need a higher salary. Discuss achievements and how you overcame obstacles.
    Unless the OP is working in the private sector that won't fly.

    The vast majority of Canadian nurses are unionized and wage increases can only occur when a certain number of hours have been worked.

    Even in the private sector, the wages are usually very close to union rates.

    No manager will hire a first year nurse and pay them top wages, the skills and knowledge just arent' there. In my province, a first year PN starts at around $26/hour. There is no manager that will pay them $35/hour which is top rated.

    You can increase your wages by working nights, weekends and afternoons. When I work weekend nights, I make an extras $8.25 an hour, which puts me around $44/hr.

  • Jul 20

    Quote from canadawali
    You can talk to your manager and justify why you think you need a higher salary. Discuss achievements and how you overcame obstacles.
    Unless the OP is working in the private sector that won't fly.

    The vast majority of Canadian nurses are unionized and wage increases can only occur when a certain number of hours have been worked.

    Even in the private sector, the wages are usually very close to union rates.

    No manager will hire a first year nurse and pay them top wages, the skills and knowledge just arent' there. In my province, a first year PN starts at around $26/hour. There is no manager that will pay them $35/hour which is top rated.

    You can increase your wages by working nights, weekends and afternoons. When I work weekend nights, I make an extras $8.25 an hour, which puts me around $44/hr.

  • Jul 20

    Quote from canadawali
    You can talk to your manager and justify why you think you need a higher salary. Discuss achievements and how you overcame obstacles.
    Unless the OP is working in the private sector that won't fly.

    The vast majority of Canadian nurses are unionized and wage increases can only occur when a certain number of hours have been worked.

    Even in the private sector, the wages are usually very close to union rates.

    No manager will hire a first year nurse and pay them top wages, the skills and knowledge just arent' there. In my province, a first year PN starts at around $26/hour. There is no manager that will pay them $35/hour which is top rated.

    You can increase your wages by working nights, weekends and afternoons. When I work weekend nights, I make an extras $8.25 an hour, which puts me around $44/hr.

  • Jul 20

    Quote from canadawali
    You can talk to your manager and justify why you think you need a higher salary. Discuss achievements and how you overcame obstacles.
    Unless the OP is working in the private sector that won't fly.

    The vast majority of Canadian nurses are unionized and wage increases can only occur when a certain number of hours have been worked.

    Even in the private sector, the wages are usually very close to union rates.

    No manager will hire a first year nurse and pay them top wages, the skills and knowledge just arent' there. In my province, a first year PN starts at around $26/hour. There is no manager that will pay them $35/hour which is top rated.

    You can increase your wages by working nights, weekends and afternoons. When I work weekend nights, I make an extras $8.25 an hour, which puts me around $44/hr.

  • Jul 18

    In a nutshell? No. Managers are looking for aides who will stay not an RN who is working at leaving. The skill set is entirely different. Depeneding on where you are employed, aides don't do vitals, or blood sugars, no med admin.

    If you did manage to obtain a job, they will always fall back on using your education against you if anything goes wrong.

  • Jul 18

    In a nutshell? No. Managers are looking for aides who will stay not an RN who is working at leaving. The skill set is entirely different. Depeneding on where you are employed, aides don't do vitals, or blood sugars, no med admin.

    If you did manage to obtain a job, they will always fall back on using your education against you if anything goes wrong.

  • Jul 18

    Hell, yes. You are ancient. I'm surprised someone of your advanced age is even contemplating new adventures

  • Jul 15

    Hell, yes. You are ancient. I'm surprised someone of your advanced age is even contemplating new adventures

  • Jul 14

    Just a couple of thing. The average Cdn. nurse hasn't got a clue what you're talking about.

    Are you a registerd nurse or one of the few enrolled nurses?

    Find out by contacting the provincial college of nurses in the province you want to relocate to if they even recognize your qualifications.

  • Jul 14

    The job you are looking for is thatbof an OR Tech. You need to find out which school offers it. Here in AB it's through Grant MacEwan.

    Can you afford not to work for several months due to the preceptorship? Does your employing health authority offer it as an educational opportunity?

    You aren't limited to the scrub role, you also circulate.

    You have to work shift and take call. You will find a lot of type A personalities in that area of nursing. How do you react to constant criticism?

    Honestly, you either love or hate the OR. It's very limited patient contact.

    Most nurses I know would kill for your job


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