Latest Likes For Fiona59

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Fiona59 36,621 Views

Joined Oct 9, '04. She has 'Ten plus' year(s) of experience. Posts: 8,055 (39% Liked) Likes: 8,552

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  • Sep 14

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Can someone please tell me what critical thinking is? Give a couple of examples? Thank you.
    something that RNs can do but LPNs can't. Sarcasm. Fully intended

  • Sep 13

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Can someone please tell me what critical thinking is? Give a couple of examples? Thank you.
    something that RNs can do but LPNs can't. Sarcasm. Fully intended

  • Sep 13

    VI s a hard market to crack. I worked there a decade ago and it was a hard, long search to find a casual gig.

    Hospitals there had a preference to hire local grads over experienced outsiders. Plus a lot of people who move to Victoria, Comox, Nanaimo seem to be married to nurses who want to work there.

    a coworker with specialty experience relocated ther about four years ago and had to start off as a casual and took a while to land a permanent job.

    the north end of the island and LTC might be easier to crack. Like north of Campbell River.

  • Sep 11

    So you are asking someone to google, then post the link, so that you don't have to?

  • Sep 10

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Can someone please tell me what critical thinking is? Give a couple of examples? Thank you.
    something that RNs can do but LPNs can't. Sarcasm. Fully intended

  • Sep 10

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Can someone please tell me what critical thinking is? Give a couple of examples? Thank you.
    something that RNs can do but LPNs can't. Sarcasm. Fully intended

  • Sep 10

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Can someone please tell me what critical thinking is? Give a couple of examples? Thank you.
    something that RNs can do but LPNs can't. Sarcasm. Fully intended

  • Sep 9

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Can someone please tell me what critical thinking is? Give a couple of examples? Thank you.
    something that RNs can do but LPNs can't. Sarcasm. Fully intended

  • Sep 9

    Quote from Belladonna2U
    I'm an RN from the US, my husband is an MD that has the opportunity to relocated our family to BC.... I started this process at the beginning of this year(2016)...First you have to register at NNAS/ SNEI..these are the people that will verify all of your documents that need to be submitted (employment/ education/ identity..etc) then NNAS will send all verified documents to CRNBC for BC to approve. To the bitter Canadian nurse who made the rude comments about US nurses coming to work in Canada.. Sweetheart we are NOT here to take your job so please don't feel that intimidated by US nurses, we are simply here to give good help to those in need... Not to mention the nursing shortage that is here.������

    Sweetie im not bitter, I'm a realist.

    My health service has frozen hiring of new nurses due to the economy and is looking for ways to eliminate nursing positions, fewer RNs and LPNs with an increase in the number of nursing aides.

    In 2007-09 our side of the forum was flooded by USRNs wanting info on how to get here. They were 99% From the Phillipines, who were waiting to get into the US. They did not hide the fact they wanted to wait here in Canada and depart south as soon as possible. They didn't want to follow the procedures required because they were USRNs, despite never having set foot in an American hospital.

    My service hired 100s of these nurses. We probably have 50% of them less than six years later. Many failed our licensing exams due to educational deficiencies, others finally managed to pass the registration exam foe LPNs. Some failed both exams three times and were sent home. One, I knew personally, went on holiday to the US and never came back.

    It sounds like your work permit will be tied to your husbands. Where are you going and how far north? There are reasons those areas are under serviced and Canadian nurses and doctors don't want to work there. I know one South African doctor who works rural, he said some of the living condition of his First Nations patients reminded him strongly of the townships back home, and he was worried about his children's education as they grew older.

    No, not bitter, just a realist on a system that is lurching along. When my unit posts a vacancy, it's not unusual to get 70+ applications internally and over 100 outside applications. Then the posting is usually cancelled and we work short.

    Good luck, if your family is going remote you will need it.

  • Sep 9

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Can someone please tell me what critical thinking is? Give a couple of examples? Thank you.
    something that RNs can do but LPNs can't. Sarcasm. Fully intended

  • Sep 8

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Can someone please tell me what critical thinking is? Give a couple of examples? Thank you.
    something that RNs can do but LPNs can't. Sarcasm. Fully intended

  • Sep 8

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Can someone please tell me what critical thinking is? Give a couple of examples? Thank you.
    something that RNs can do but LPNs can't. Sarcasm. Fully intended

  • Sep 8

    The float pool at my hospital hires new grads. They are given a very good orientation to the service they will work on. You're hired for Medicine, Surgery, or Women's Services, etc. You are given orientation shifts on every unit within the service (it's a better orientation than you get being hired for a specific unit),

    The float pool covers sick calls and vacations. Trust me, floats are needed. On the rare occasion that there aren't sick calls, vacation days, stat holidays, moving/personal leave days, bereavement days, etc, the floats work as "extra" hands.

    I have several friends who are permanent floats and they started as new grads. They love the fact they aren't anywhere long enough to get involved in unit politics, never have to work more than a few shifts with nurses they don't like, and have learnt which unit they would never want to work on.

  • Sep 8

    I love 4 hours. Full patient load. The best thing about being the "fill in" nurse is you actually get to leave very close to the actual time of your shift ending. They don't want to pay you overtime and when its four hours you're gone.

    You have to be organized because there is no down time to catch up on your charting, but chart as you go, patient by patient.

    It works quite well in my hospital.

  • Sep 8

    Quote from Canucks
    Because RN grads are qualified and can also work as RPNs once they are licensed? It's not that hard to comprehend.
    Ontario is the only province that permits this.

    and it seems that the difference between the two roles is not clear enough for Ontario RN graduates. It's not all about skills. Delegation and differing levels of responsibility are huge factors.

    Whick units can a PN be charge on? PNs know this, it's basic knowledge.

    Bring back the days when graduation from a school of practical nursing was mandatory for being eligible to write for PN registration.


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