Latest Comments by Imafloat

Latest Comments by Imafloat

Imafloat (6,139 Views)

Joined Sep 24, '04. Posts: 1,311 (16% Liked) Likes: 1,064

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 0

    Make sure you let us know when you hear something! I got all caught up in your thread and I'm wondering how it went.

  • 16

    It drives me nuts when they don't pay attention to what I'm saying because they're asking questions that I'll answer by giving them report.

  • 0

    I'm putting together a resume and I've held 2 nursing jobs in the same hospital. How do I handle this? I'm a member of float staff now, but worked in a unit before this.

  • 0

    Make sure that the questions you ask you know why you are asking them. The nurse you are following is just a person doing their job. They aren't evaluating your interest in the Nicu, they know you want to be there, otherwise you wouldn't have applied. I have had candidates job shadow me, and I have had people ask me lots of technical questions that they looked up on the Internet that had nothing to do with the patients I was taking care of that day. I felt it took away from getting to know me, and getting to know the unit.I'm not sure about every facility, but at my hospital a job shadow is an opportunity to see how you might fit in in the unit, sort of an informal unit interview, lol. Try to observe as much interaction as you can between different disciplines to see if it fits into your ideal. Do the doctors and nurses have mutual respect, do the nurses help each other out, are the assignments fair looking. See if it's a place you can picture yourself.I hope they have you shadow a person who is good at it. Be yourself, ask questions you are generally interested in knowing the answers to.

  • 1
    Bortaz, RN likes this.

    I teach my students and orientees, blood pressure before temperature. They question me, and I tell them, you'll see...they get the temp and totally get it.

  • 1
    Nola009 likes this.

    I've now been a nurse for 6 years! I come back and read this article sometimes when I'm burned out, because it takes me right back to that time. I've left the NICU, because, get ready for it....... I was BORED! I'm still at the same facility, just another job. I am considering a move away from the bedside, but I love taking care of kids so much I'm not sure I can leave them.I hope all who have struggled have found peace and all who are currently struggling find solace in the article and the comments.Good luck everyone!

  • 6
    xoemmylouox, RNam, VivaLasViejas, and 3 others like this.

    I have and miracles are what keep me going sometimes.My patient for the day was a 3 week old former 24 weeker with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). He was septic as well. He may have weighed 2 pounds. We were getting KUBs every 4 hours, because his bowel walls were getting thinner and thinner. I sat in his room with his parents all day, they had no idea how grave the situation was. If his bowel would have perforated he would have had to go to surgery but he was septic so it would be dangerous, if the surgeon felt surgery was doable. I stayed 16 hours that day. The last KUB was stable.I went home and came back the next day. His KUBs stayed stable. He ended up not perffing. That is a miracle. In the 2 months before he came we had 3 babies come with NEC ( we are referral NICU) two of the babies were so sick that they didn't make it. I was so scared for this baby, we had the code cart parked outside his room.He slowly got better and when he left his bowel was perfect. His mama just brought him in to see me. He is 3 now. I told her this visit what a miracle he is. He gave me a hug, it made my day.

  • 9
    Fiona59, fiveofpeep, Ruby Vee, and 6 others like this.

    I don't have a problem with all new grads.

    I was once a new grad too, a new grad who absorbed everything like a sponge, who didn't tell the veteran nurses that what they were doing was wrong, who saw things that were different than she learned in nursing school, who's preceptor took really long lunch breaks, and who had ideas of how things could be done better.

    I just did my orientation, kept my mouth shut and once I had been there a year or two I saw how things were on the other foot.

    I made my practice unique to me, and I can sleep well at night with the job I do.


    I've seen a lot of self righteous new grads eating their veterans.

    They don't usually last.

  • 2

    There was a PCA on my old unit like this. I worked in a level III NICU. Once I had a surgeon call and tell me he was on his way up to do a rectal dilation on a patient in 10 minutes and to gather everything. I went to the nursing station and the PCA was standing there, talking to someone about vacation. I said, excuse me, Dr. So and so is coming up in 10 minutes to do a procedure on Baby Jones, can you please go get an open bed warmer and take it to room 24? I've called CSS for the dilators and I'm getting the Fentanyl and Versed. She looked at me and pointed to the storage room and said, "see that door right there, it leads to the storage room, and there are all the open bed warmers you need in there, what you do is get one and roll it to your room." I was a new nurse and new on the unit so I thought that somehow I was a problem or had done something terrible to this person. I was flustered because the surgeon was rude and pushy and he would be obnoxious if everything wasn't ready when he got to the unit. I looked at her with shock and another nurse overheard what happened and told her that it was her job to do it and she needed to go get it set up. She went and set it up, she later came to me and told me it was her job to help me, but if she was busy that I needed to wait for her to be done.

    Over time I realized that this is how this PCA was. She treated all of the new people like this. I finally sat down with her and our assistant manager and aired my concerns. Nothing changed except how I dealt with her. I learned to phrase things so that it was her choice to help me. I hated that I had to do that, but sometimes it's easier to deal with people like that than deal with their constant drama. Administration isn't doing their job by allowing that to happen, but it's not my problem anymore, I left that dysfunctional unit.

    I feel like the equivalent of this behavior would be a nurse telling a doctor no when they wrote an order.

  • 0

    I was on it for migraines. It stopped the migraines, but I had to go off of it. My side effects were that I felt like I was starving all the time, numb/tingling hands and feet, mental dullness, and I couldn't find all of my words when I needed them. At that time I was in the NICU and I was so stupid I had to go off. I admitted a baby with an imperforate anus and the resident was talking about the potential level of the defect, yammering on and on with nary a breath. I looked at my student and said, I have no idea what the heck she is talking about, do you? I had to go to the resident and ask for an explanation. That was when I decided that I needed to go off, because honestly, imperforate anuses are a dime a dozen in the NICU and I should have totally known what that doc was talking about. It was a glimpse to me of what the parent experience must feel like when we bombard them with all that information.

  • 3

    I am pretty jaded when it comes to the negative politics and crap at work, but I love the reason I went into nursing. I love seeing those cheesy commercials, because they go through the hard walls of my heart, to the tender place and make me proud of what I do for a living.

    I also selfishly love when my kids see those commercials and I am in the same room. My kids are beyond the age of thinking I am all that, but they aren't old enough to appreciate me yet. They see those commercials and they look at me with a little appreciation, which usually only lasts a moment, but I like the glimpse of humanity I see.

  • 0

    NSO is who I use and recommend. I've read on here of nurses needing their services and they have always come through.

    As for associations, what is your specialty?

  • 4
    holinurse, netglow, KelRN215, and 1 other like this.

    I truly believe Magnet is a way administration can pat themselves on the back for a job well done.

    The patients can't even tell the difference between, housekeeping, nursing, respiratory, even doctors, do you think they understand what magnet status is.

  • 0

    Our facility was nominated for the best workplace for working mothers award. The survey for that came the week before my employee (dis)satisfaction survey. I had no idea and was leaving anyway so I was very frank in my answers. Oh my, was there pie on my face when I received an email later in the week with a link to the employee satisfaction survey. I wonder how many people made the same mistake as me.

  • 7
    DixieRedHead, canoehead, LVNBSN2, and 4 others like this.

    Quote from NoviceRN10
    I tried to fill out a recent survey twice but when it got to asking me questions about whether I was a BSN or ADN, and how long I'd worked on my unit, etc. I bailed. Nothing anonymous about those questions. I was going to fake some answers too but it would have been way too many .
    Call me evil but when faced with those questions on a survey I looked to the most brown nosing, administration favorite, know it all, in your face, smug nurse on the unit and matched my demographics as closely to hers as I could.


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