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No Stars In My Eyes 31,672 Views

Hi! Thanks for checking out my page. I've been a member of allnurses since Apr 8th, '11. I have no blogs or journals to follow, but you are welcome to find me on the threads I follow, where I love humor and silliness to counter the seriousness of life. Feel free to chime in. Currently work PD/Geriatrics.

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  • Oct 19

    Hey, Orca, my mom was an RN and she had a set of the glass syringes, too she had 3-4 different sized needles and had to file/sharpen them because they would get 'burs' on them. She gave my younger brother allergy shots for his asthma.

    And those glass IV fluids bottles! We sometimes took a break in a fairly large, but seldom used treatment room. There were IV bottles of every type and size stored in there. One evening immediately after we walked out of the room, an entire big cabinet above a sink, loaded w/ the biggest IV bottles, just ... let loose from the wall and crashed into the middle of the room sending tons of glass EVERYWHERE. We all kind of gave each other the side-eye, because if we had been any slower leaving the room, there could have been some awful injuries.
    The people from the floor below us came rushing upstairs to see what had happened, and one said "It sounded like a bomb went off!" Of course, in those days the likelihood of a bombing happening was pretty much zero to none. But it was certainly an exceptionally loud crash!

  • Oct 19

    Remember the gasps from back in the days of cold, metal bedpans? And the reverberations when you dropped one on the floor?

  • Oct 18

    "Back when" . . . it was simply an option between being an LPN and an RN. No NP's, no FNP's, no RN Anesthesiologists (whatever those initials are).
    Since I never aspired to get my RN ( no big push for BSN's then, either) I was perfectly content to be a bedside nurse.

    And then the mien changed from Team Nursing to Primary Nursing. As originally conceived, Primary Nursing was not the bastardized version it became shortly after it was implemented.
    Thereafter things got worse and worse: nurse/patient ratios got RIDICULOUS, insurance companies began dictating everything about patient care, Doctors were hobbled, reasonable staffing numbers were deemed unnecessary; though patient acuity increased, time spent in the hospital was drastically truncated; charting got redundant and then the redundancy was followed by records being computerized; the Business Template forced it's square peg into the practice of the ART of Medicine's round hole. Satisfaction surveys became a Holy Writ.
    Bedside nursing in a facility is a race, with the length of shift hours going from a reasonable eight hours to a punishing twelve, and what with 2-3-4 of those in a row, an endurance contest.

    Bah. To me, it is not bedside nursing anymore, even if that is where one works; it is not a handbasket I care to travel in.

  • Oct 17

    "Back when" . . . it was simply an option between being an LPN and an RN. No NP's, no FNP's, no RN Anesthesiologists (whatever those initials are).
    Since I never aspired to get my RN ( no big push for BSN's then, either) I was perfectly content to be a bedside nurse.

    And then the mien changed from Team Nursing to Primary Nursing. As originally conceived, Primary Nursing was not the bastardized version it became shortly after it was implemented.
    Thereafter things got worse and worse: nurse/patient ratios got RIDICULOUS, insurance companies began dictating everything about patient care, Doctors were hobbled, reasonable staffing numbers were deemed unnecessary; though patient acuity increased, time spent in the hospital was drastically truncated; charting got redundant and then the redundancy was followed by records being computerized; the Business Template forced it's square peg into the practice of the ART of Medicine's round hole. Satisfaction surveys became a Holy Writ.
    Bedside nursing in a facility is a race, with the length of shift hours going from a reasonable eight hours to a punishing twelve, and what with 2-3-4 of those in a row, an endurance contest.

    Bah. To me, it is not bedside nursing anymore, even if that is where one works; it is not a handbasket I care to travel in.

  • Oct 17

    Hey, Orca, my mom was an RN and she had a set of the glass syringes, too she had 3-4 different sized needles and had to file/sharpen them because they would get 'burs' on them. She gave my younger brother allergy shots for his asthma.

    And those glass IV fluids bottles! We sometimes took a break in a fairly large, but seldom used treatment room. There were IV bottles of every type and size stored in there. One evening immediately after we walked out of the room, an entire big cabinet above a sink, loaded w/ the biggest IV bottles, just ... let loose from the wall and crashed into the middle of the room sending tons of glass EVERYWHERE. We all kind of gave each other the side-eye, because if we had been any slower leaving the room, there could have been some awful injuries.
    The people from the floor below us came rushing upstairs to see what had happened, and one said "It sounded like a bomb went off!" Of course, in those days the likelihood of a bombing happening was pretty much zero to none. But it was certainly an exceptionally loud crash!

  • Oct 17

    Hey, Orca, my mom was an RN and she had a set of the glass syringes, too she had 3-4 different sized needles and had to file/sharpen them because they would get 'burs' on them. She gave my younger brother allergy shots for his asthma.

    And those glass IV fluids bottles! We sometimes took a break in a fairly large, but seldom used treatment room. There were IV bottles of every type and size stored in there. One evening immediately after we walked out of the room, an entire big cabinet above a sink, loaded w/ the biggest IV bottles, just ... let loose from the wall and crashed into the middle of the room sending tons of glass EVERYWHERE. We all kind of gave each other the side-eye, because if we had been any slower leaving the room, there could have been some awful injuries.
    The people from the floor below us came rushing upstairs to see what had happened, and one said "It sounded like a bomb went off!" Of course, in those days the likelihood of a bombing happening was pretty much zero to none. But it was certainly an exceptionally loud crash!

  • Oct 17

    Remember the gasps from back in the days of cold, metal bedpans? And the reverberations when you dropped one on the floor?

  • Oct 17

    audrey'smagic,
    as w/ your anecdote about the Case family, I went to school with a girl whose last name was Court. Fortunately the seven children had 'normal' names, but their family joke was that they SHOULD have named them Motor, Tennis, Auto, then both Bocci + Basket would've had the middle name "Ball", of course; then there was also Small Claims and Juvenile. They came up with several other names they might have used, but I can't remember those.
    They were a nice family with a great sense of humor.

  • Oct 17

    This thread is one of my favorites of the whole AN site!

  • Oct 13

    Remember the gasps from back in the days of cold, metal bedpans? And the reverberations when you dropped one on the floor?

  • Oct 13

    Remember the gasps from back in the days of cold, metal bedpans? And the reverberations when you dropped one on the floor?

  • Oct 12

    Someday, far in the future, we'll run across an "Ebola" and a "Zika" because someone thinks they are such cute names!

  • Oct 10

    You know, I am an extroverted introvert; I'm quite animated and outgoing at work, but my time is my time. I don't do a lot of socializing either; groups and crowds suck the life out of me when I'd rather just stay at home with hubby and the dogs. At least with AN I get to socialize quietly, and at my leisure.
    I really love most of my patients but after spending 12 hours with my attention turned outward, I'm happy to get home. I rarely attend anything if I can help it!

    Edited to add: I used to work a hospital float pool so I'd not be assigned the same floor with the same patients and personnel. Home Health full-time Week-ends was good that way, too; not so much of the stultifying sameness day-to-day.

  • Oct 7

    Quote from smartnurse1982
    Maybe agencies can solve this by paying more $$$ for night shift.

    I will say that some situations during NOC shift that encourage sleep.
    There are some parents who refuse to allow a nurse to work on their own laptop or play games on their cell phone.
    I am soy,but you cannot expect a nurse to just sit there and look at the twinkling lights.
    Would you as a parent want to work at night in the dark staring at the patient and the wall?
    We used to have shift and W/E differential pay, once upon a time. They cut that out when they instituted a 2.3% pay cut across the board. Pfffttt!
    And there are certain cases where you are NOT ALLOWED to read or use cell or tablet. Yes, you are supposed to keep your eyes ON the patient, even if all they are doing is sleeping. Of course, I can see the necessity with SOME patients, but if there ever was a 'recipe' for falling asleep on the job, staring at the patient and the wall in the dark would be prime ingredients.

  • Oct 7

    When my Mom did PDN/nights, one of her elderly patients wanted her to go across the hall and lay down on the guest room bed; the patient's idea was to have my Mom tie a loooong string to her big toe and give the other end to the patient, who said she'd "give a little tug" if she needed something. Then she added,
    "I do so hate disturbing you girls during the night; you need your rest, too!"

    PS This was long before any temp agencies; she worked through a "Private Registry".


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