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No Stars In My Eyes 25,863 Views

Hi! Thanks for checking out my page. I've been a member of allnurses since Apr 8th, '11. I have no blogs or journals to follow, but you are welcome to find me on the threads I follow, where I love humor and silliness to counter the seriousness of life. Feel free to chime in. Currently work PD/Geriatrics.

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  • Jan 12

    Quote from Davey Do
    Quite honestly I can't say that I have. My mustache is not as long as yours, and I never wear scrubs.

  • Jan 12

    Quote from Davey Do
    Quite honestly I can't say that I have. My mustache is not as long as yours, and I never wear scrubs.

  • Jan 12

    Quote from Davey Do
    Quite honestly I can't say that I have. My mustache is not as long as yours, and I never wear scrubs.

  • Jan 11

    I spent 2 days in hospital once, with a name/ID band that had my last name spelled wrong, making it another name entirely. Every time I told someone their response was "Oh, okay. Well be sure to tell the next person, too."

    What, someone can't type my CORRECT last name on another name band and replace this one?? Geeez!
    I must say, I found it quite worrisome.

  • Jan 10

    I spent 2 days in hospital once, with a name/ID band that had my last name spelled wrong, making it another name entirely. Every time I told someone their response was "Oh, okay. Well be sure to tell the next person, too."

    What, someone can't type my CORRECT last name on another name band and replace this one?? Geeez!
    I must say, I found it quite worrisome.

  • Jan 10

    I spent 2 days in hospital once, with a name/ID band that had my last name spelled wrong, making it another name entirely. Every time I told someone their response was "Oh, okay. Well be sure to tell the next person, too."

    What, someone can't type my CORRECT last name on another name band and replace this one?? Geeez!
    I must say, I found it quite worrisome.

  • Jan 9

    American College Dictionary, 1948:

    blat - blatted, blatting. --v. i. 1.) to cry out, as a calf or a sheep. -- 2.) Colloq. ‚Äčto utter loudly and indiscreetly; blurt. [imit. Cf. BLEAT.]

    (you have la cucaracha uttering indiscreetly?)

  • Jan 9

    American College Dictionary, 1948:

    blat - blatted, blatting. --v. i. 1.) to cry out, as a calf or a sheep. -- 2.) Colloq. ‚Äčto utter loudly and indiscreetly; blurt. [imit. Cf. BLEAT.]

    (you have la cucaracha uttering indiscreetly?)

  • Jan 9

    My PDN pt. was eating her lunch and watching TV; I was perusing a catalog.
    She leaned over and tapped me on the knee and said,
    "Do you realize you're reading that magazine backwards?"
    I said, "Do you realize you're eating your soup with a fork?"

  • Jan 6

    Warning: Appendeage-less People At Play!

  • Jan 6

    Quote from Davey Do
    Mebbe they were dubious about the inference that you may have ripped AN a new one?

  • Jan 6

    Quote from Davey Do
    Mebbe they were dubious about the inference that you may have ripped AN a new one?

  • Jan 3

    Back in the day (when we walked to work barefoot in two feet of snow and had to count IV drips by holding our watch next to the drip port...) there was no such thing as a preceptor.
    My education was, fortunately, at a nsg. school attached to a hospital where the LPN course was 18 months long. You didn't just learn something in class. AS you were learning it, you were experiencing it. Some said the hospital 'used' the students as a way to keep up the staffing #'s. But it really gave us the opportunity, though, to get our feet wet and lose a little of that green behind our ears
    A 'trial-by-fire' teaching/learning method put the knowledge not just in your head, but added a little seasoning in the mix, so you didn't feel quite so scared when you went out on your own. I had always heard from other nurses, when I was an NA (no certification back then, just on-the-job-training.) that 'those girls (from my nsg. sch.) really know what they're doing.' That's why I went there.
    Once out in the real world I was surprised to encounter new RN's who had all the theory down pat, an understanding of a number of things, but no practical experience! I felt sorry for them, that they went through all that to arrive at their new jobs quite literally trembling when they had a patient who needed a procedure performed on them. I can't tell you the number of new RN grads I showed how to do even simple things like dressing changes. One girl even cried when she admitted to me that she had never done a foley cath on a 'real person'.
    I was not the sort of person to feel and act superior just because I'd already had so many chances to get the experience under my belt while still in school. I was kind; I know what it's like to feel new, and dumb even though actually quite smart., even though for me, it might have been under different circumstances. NOBODY likes to feel that way! So, I'd demonstrate for them by doing it for them, and with the next patient, talk them through it as they did it for themselves.
    I never could figure out why RN education didn't include a good, healthy dose of the actual practice. If simply playing the piano requires a lot of lessons and experience, why on earth would a good nursing school with a good reputation not include something so necessary in their curriculum?

  • Dec 30 '16

    Oh. It's Tom that wore the upside-down funnel on his head, not the dog. Memory can be such a nuisance.

  • Dec 30 '16

    Oh. It's Tom that wore the upside-down funnel on his head, not the dog. Memory can be such a nuisance.


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