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No Stars In My Eyes 28,809 Views

Hi! Thanks for checking out my page. I've been a member of allnurses since Apr 8th, '11. I have no blogs or journals to follow, but you are welcome to find me on the threads I follow, where I love humor and silliness to counter the seriousness of life. Feel free to chime in. Currently work PD/Geriatrics.

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  • 12:43 am

    I've been doing PD through an agency for half my working life. I will not accept a case where it is required that I sit in a dark room for 12 hours and look at the patient the whole time. I understand that kind of care is needed sometimes, but I can not do it. Fortunately I am in a position to be able to accept or refuse a case, and I do say no, if those are the conditions required.

    What I usually do while on the job is have a clipboard of crossword puzzles and a pen on standby. I tell my pt and the family that it is one way I found to keep my mind occupied while pt sleeps or is otherwise quiet and not requiring activity. My reasoning seems to set them at ease: When I am doing a crossword puzzle, I can drop it at a moment's notice...without feeling like I am being 'interrupted'. (because we all know the patient who doesn't want to "bother" us!) Likewise, I can pick it up again at any point in time and have no trouble finding my place again, so to speak. So, it doesn't interfere with my work at all.

    When I worked nights, I had a teeny-tiny light to see what I was reading or writing. I did find it problematic though, in that I was so focused on that spot of light, when I looked up I had to wait for my eyes to adjust.

    If the patient is one of the randomly restless kinds, generally I sit right next to the bed and keep one hand either on the mattress or the patient while they sleep or just quietly rest (one lol loved for me to hold her hand, and told her dgt. I held her hand all night so she wouldn't be scared.)

    Seriously, everyone in nursing and anyone in a family who have night shift coverage for a loved one, should try to just sit in a darkened room, looking at a form under the bed-covers. I'm not saying this sarcastically.
    ... And, Jolie, reviewing policy and procedure manuals would put the ki-bosh on my brain faster than an anesthesiologist telling me to count backwards from 100!

    Back to being in our shoes...See how long you last, sitting and looking, if the patient is resting well. Listening to someone peacefully breathing in their sleep is a sure way to suggest to your subconscious, "Hey! THAT's a good idea..."

    And then, Zzzzzzzzzz...

  • Jun 24

    I've been doing PD through an agency for half my working life. I will not accept a case where it is required that I sit in a dark room for 12 hours and look at the patient the whole time. I understand that kind of care is needed sometimes, but I can not do it. Fortunately I am in a position to be able to accept or refuse a case, and I do say no, if those are the conditions required.

    What I usually do while on the job is have a clipboard of crossword puzzles and a pen on standby. I tell my pt and the family that it is one way I found to keep my mind occupied while pt sleeps or is otherwise quiet and not requiring activity. My reasoning seems to set them at ease: When I am doing a crossword puzzle, I can drop it at a moment's notice...without feeling like I am being 'interrupted'. (because we all know the patient who doesn't want to "bother" us!) Likewise, I can pick it up again at any point in time and have no trouble finding my place again, so to speak. So, it doesn't interfere with my work at all.

    When I worked nights, I had a teeny-tiny light to see what I was reading or writing. I did find it problematic though, in that I was so focused on that spot of light, when I looked up I had to wait for my eyes to adjust.

    If the patient is one of the randomly restless kinds, generally I sit right next to the bed and keep one hand either on the mattress or the patient while they sleep or just quietly rest (one lol loved for me to hold her hand, and told her dgt. I held her hand all night so she wouldn't be scared.)

    Seriously, everyone in nursing and anyone in a family who have night shift coverage for a loved one, should try to just sit in a darkened room, looking at a form under the bed-covers. I'm not saying this sarcastically.
    ... And, Jolie, reviewing policy and procedure manuals would put the ki-bosh on my brain faster than an anesthesiologist telling me to count backwards from 100!

    Back to being in our shoes...See how long you last, sitting and looking, if the patient is resting well. Listening to someone peacefully breathing in their sleep is a sure way to suggest to your subconscious, "Hey! THAT's a good idea..."

    And then, Zzzzzzzzzz...

  • Jun 23

    Quote from DizzyJon
    Yes, I left. The whole practice was a mess. It was a husband physician and wife office manager situation and NEVER EVER AGAIN.
    Whew! Good for you!

    I worked in a husband and wife office once and BOTH were docs.
    They thought their quick-fire bickering-bickering-bickering was amusing, I guess in a 1930's madcap-movies kind of way. It wasn't; it set my teeth on edge.
    It's a thousand wonders I didn't just scream at them to SHUT-UP!

    The wifey doc took few patients, and was mostly busy on her computer trying to figure out a way to get out of paying her student loans.

    I second your vote of NEVER EVER AGAIN!

  • Jun 23

    I've been doing PD through an agency for half my working life. I will not accept a case where it is required that I sit in a dark room for 12 hours and look at the patient the whole time. I understand that kind of care is needed sometimes, but I can not do it. Fortunately I am in a position to be able to accept or refuse a case, and I do say no, if those are the conditions required.

    What I usually do while on the job is have a clipboard of crossword puzzles and a pen on standby. I tell my pt and the family that it is one way I found to keep my mind occupied while pt sleeps or is otherwise quiet and not requiring activity. My reasoning seems to set them at ease: When I am doing a crossword puzzle, I can drop it at a moment's notice...without feeling like I am being 'interrupted'. (because we all know the patient who doesn't want to "bother" us!) Likewise, I can pick it up again at any point in time and have no trouble finding my place again, so to speak. So, it doesn't interfere with my work at all.

    When I worked nights, I had a teeny-tiny light to see what I was reading or writing. I did find it problematic though, in that I was so focused on that spot of light, when I looked up I had to wait for my eyes to adjust.

    If the patient is one of the randomly restless kinds, generally I sit right next to the bed and keep one hand either on the mattress or the patient while they sleep or just quietly rest (one lol loved for me to hold her hand, and told her dgt. I held her hand all night so she wouldn't be scared.)

    Seriously, everyone in nursing and anyone in a family who have night shift coverage for a loved one, should try to just sit in a darkened room, looking at a form under the bed-covers. I'm not saying this sarcastically.
    ... And, Jolie, reviewing policy and procedure manuals would put the ki-bosh on my brain faster than an anesthesiologist telling me to count backwards from 100!

    Back to being in our shoes...See how long you last, sitting and looking, if the patient is resting well. Listening to someone peacefully breathing in their sleep is a sure way to suggest to your subconscious, "Hey! THAT's a good idea..."

    And then, Zzzzzzzzzz...

  • Jun 23

    Quote from purplegal
    I basically work 29-30 out of 30 or 31 days of the month.
    That one sentence explains everything!
    .....Whew! It exhausts me just to even briefly contemplate working such a schedule!

  • Jun 23

    I knew a doc long ago who used to stop by the OR suites when his colleagues were doing operations, 'just to see how things were going.' As he was leaving, he'd look at the patient's chart, noting name, dx, etc. He would then send the patient a bill for 'consultation'. I know this because it happened to me; I was one of those patients in the OR, having my impacted wisdom teeth removed. I also worked 3-11 at that hospital.

    I took the bill to his office and standing in the waiting room full of patients, I told the nurse at the desk, not loudly, but not whispering discretely, either..."I don't see how I could be receiving a bill from Dr. So+So; he may have come by the OR and my doctor may have said "Look at this"...and on the way out he picked up my name off the chart...but THAT'S not a consultation."
    At that moment, that doctor came out from around the wall that backed the receptionist's area, where I am quite sure he heard everything I said. He looked at me, looked at the bill, picked it up, and looking me straight in the eyes, he tore the bill in half. I just said thank-you as I nodded my head once, turned, and left.
    To ME the look he communicated to me was sort of, "How could you possibly have known that? You were under anesthesia!"

    It never occurred to me that he should be reported; I was young and was simply happy with not having to pay that bill.

    So, all that to say, yeah, there are doctors everyday who try to get away with padding their income. Not all, but you do hear or read about medical practices getting caught trying to defraud Medicare/Medicaid.

    I also know of a big, booming nursing-temp business that had a Financial Officer doing the same thing. It nearly tanked the business, but now it is a small business with barely any redeeming qualities. How the mighty have fallen. How people think they can get away with it is beyond me.

    If I was employed where you are, it would also make me suspicious of the way the doc seems to conduct business. If he got caught doing what you think he's doing, there would be an investigation; how would you explain your 'part' in it, as in: if you knew, why didn't you report him...or were you two in collusion? THAT possibility right there would give me pause and not just nudge me, but PUSH me to find another job, pronto!

  • Jun 23

    Yeah, I think your nerves are normal. New grad, new to a hospital and moved to a new state? Maybe it's excitement mixed in with the fear? I know I used to really look forward to making changes in my life back in my 20's and 30's. It was liberating to do something new and different, and get the experiences under my belt. That's what built my confidence, realizing that "Hey, I'm doing okay!"

    No job, even a 'dream job' is going to be what you expect...and it could surprise you and may end up being better than you ever imagined. Yes, it can happen! But even that doesn't preclude a fly or two in the ointment. Nothing is as perfect as the imagined expectations of a dream job. And an "okay" job is a fine place to start your career.

    Don't keep second-guessing yourself. I think jumping right in and getting wet is the thing to do. Nothing lasts forever anyway, you know..."This too shall pass" ....really and truly it isn't just a cliche'd saying. Sadly, even the 'good' passes, too.
    To me that is harder than going INTO something, having to leave or say goodbye to something/someone that was a positive in life.

    Believe it or not, regardless of any outcome, you will be fine!

    My husband wants to add his favorite saying when he faces something daunting:
    "Well, that's okay; they can only kill me, they can't eat me."
    (I'm not sure that's helpful; but he hopes it will make you smile)

  • Jun 23

    I've been doing PD through an agency for half my working life. I will not accept a case where it is required that I sit in a dark room for 12 hours and look at the patient the whole time. I understand that kind of care is needed sometimes, but I can not do it. Fortunately I am in a position to be able to accept or refuse a case, and I do say no, if those are the conditions required.

    What I usually do while on the job is have a clipboard of crossword puzzles and a pen on standby. I tell my pt and the family that it is one way I found to keep my mind occupied while pt sleeps or is otherwise quiet and not requiring activity. My reasoning seems to set them at ease: When I am doing a crossword puzzle, I can drop it at a moment's notice...without feeling like I am being 'interrupted'. (because we all know the patient who doesn't want to "bother" us!) Likewise, I can pick it up again at any point in time and have no trouble finding my place again, so to speak. So, it doesn't interfere with my work at all.

    When I worked nights, I had a teeny-tiny light to see what I was reading or writing. I did find it problematic though, in that I was so focused on that spot of light, when I looked up I had to wait for my eyes to adjust.

    If the patient is one of the randomly restless kinds, generally I sit right next to the bed and keep one hand either on the mattress or the patient while they sleep or just quietly rest (one lol loved for me to hold her hand, and told her dgt. I held her hand all night so she wouldn't be scared.)

    Seriously, everyone in nursing and anyone in a family who have night shift coverage for a loved one, should try to just sit in a darkened room, looking at a form under the bed-covers. I'm not saying this sarcastically.
    ... And, Jolie, reviewing policy and procedure manuals would put the ki-bosh on my brain faster than an anesthesiologist telling me to count backwards from 100!

    Back to being in our shoes...See how long you last, sitting and looking, if the patient is resting well. Listening to someone peacefully breathing in their sleep is a sure way to suggest to your subconscious, "Hey! THAT's a good idea..."

    And then, Zzzzzzzzzz...

  • Jun 22

    I had VERY poor math scores in high school. I was accepted into nsg school under a stipulation.
    I wrestled with the math in formulas in Pharmacology; on the day of my final exam, I was sweatin' it. Imagine my surprise when I got to the first question involving those formulas, and suddenly everything fell into place! I thought, "Oh. I see. Okay."...and I was even more surprised than anyone when I aced the exam!
    I realize this is not helpful to you, but maybe encouraging, because one day math is a riddle and the next day it's clear as a bell. It can happen for anyone. Just don't give up. I had 4 diff people tutor me at various points and each one explained things a little differently; all of those bits of tutoring came together for me, and it can for you, too!

    P.S. Part of my problem with understanding was that the instructor explained things using pie-charts. Well, my brain has never been able to wrap itself around pie-charts. Once I converted it in my head to dollars and cents, that helped.

  • Jun 22

    I've been doing PD through an agency for half my working life. I will not accept a case where it is required that I sit in a dark room for 12 hours and look at the patient the whole time. I understand that kind of care is needed sometimes, but I can not do it. Fortunately I am in a position to be able to accept or refuse a case, and I do say no, if those are the conditions required.

    What I usually do while on the job is have a clipboard of crossword puzzles and a pen on standby. I tell my pt and the family that it is one way I found to keep my mind occupied while pt sleeps or is otherwise quiet and not requiring activity. My reasoning seems to set them at ease: When I am doing a crossword puzzle, I can drop it at a moment's notice...without feeling like I am being 'interrupted'. (because we all know the patient who doesn't want to "bother" us!) Likewise, I can pick it up again at any point in time and have no trouble finding my place again, so to speak. So, it doesn't interfere with my work at all.

    When I worked nights, I had a teeny-tiny light to see what I was reading or writing. I did find it problematic though, in that I was so focused on that spot of light, when I looked up I had to wait for my eyes to adjust.

    If the patient is one of the randomly restless kinds, generally I sit right next to the bed and keep one hand either on the mattress or the patient while they sleep or just quietly rest (one lol loved for me to hold her hand, and told her dgt. I held her hand all night so she wouldn't be scared.)

    Seriously, everyone in nursing and anyone in a family who have night shift coverage for a loved one, should try to just sit in a darkened room, looking at a form under the bed-covers. I'm not saying this sarcastically.
    ... And, Jolie, reviewing policy and procedure manuals would put the ki-bosh on my brain faster than an anesthesiologist telling me to count backwards from 100!

    Back to being in our shoes...See how long you last, sitting and looking, if the patient is resting well. Listening to someone peacefully breathing in their sleep is a sure way to suggest to your subconscious, "Hey! THAT's a good idea..."

    And then, Zzzzzzzzzz...

  • Jun 22

    I knew a doc long ago who used to stop by the OR suites when his colleagues were doing operations, 'just to see how things were going.' As he was leaving, he'd look at the patient's chart, noting name, dx, etc. He would then send the patient a bill for 'consultation'. I know this because it happened to me; I was one of those patients in the OR, having my impacted wisdom teeth removed. I also worked 3-11 at that hospital.

    I took the bill to his office and standing in the waiting room full of patients, I told the nurse at the desk, not loudly, but not whispering discretely, either..."I don't see how I could be receiving a bill from Dr. So+So; he may have come by the OR and my doctor may have said "Look at this"...and on the way out he picked up my name off the chart...but THAT'S not a consultation."
    At that moment, that doctor came out from around the wall that backed the receptionist's area, where I am quite sure he heard everything I said. He looked at me, looked at the bill, picked it up, and looking me straight in the eyes, he tore the bill in half. I just said thank-you as I nodded my head once, turned, and left.
    To ME the look he communicated to me was sort of, "How could you possibly have known that? You were under anesthesia!"

    It never occurred to me that he should be reported; I was young and was simply happy with not having to pay that bill.

    So, all that to say, yeah, there are doctors everyday who try to get away with padding their income. Not all, but you do hear or read about medical practices getting caught trying to defraud Medicare/Medicaid.

    I also know of a big, booming nursing-temp business that had a Financial Officer doing the same thing. It nearly tanked the business, but now it is a small business with barely any redeeming qualities. How the mighty have fallen. How people think they can get away with it is beyond me.

    If I was employed where you are, it would also make me suspicious of the way the doc seems to conduct business. If he got caught doing what you think he's doing, there would be an investigation; how would you explain your 'part' in it, as in: if you knew, why didn't you report him...or were you two in collusion? THAT possibility right there would give me pause and not just nudge me, but PUSH me to find another job, pronto!

  • Jun 22

    Quote from purplegal
    I basically work 29-30 out of 30 or 31 days of the month.
    That one sentence explains everything!
    .....Whew! It exhausts me just to even briefly contemplate working such a schedule!

  • Jun 21

    I knew a doc long ago who used to stop by the OR suites when his colleagues were doing operations, 'just to see how things were going.' As he was leaving, he'd look at the patient's chart, noting name, dx, etc. He would then send the patient a bill for 'consultation'. I know this because it happened to me; I was one of those patients in the OR, having my impacted wisdom teeth removed. I also worked 3-11 at that hospital.

    I took the bill to his office and standing in the waiting room full of patients, I told the nurse at the desk, not loudly, but not whispering discretely, either..."I don't see how I could be receiving a bill from Dr. So+So; he may have come by the OR and my doctor may have said "Look at this"...and on the way out he picked up my name off the chart...but THAT'S not a consultation."
    At that moment, that doctor came out from around the wall that backed the receptionist's area, where I am quite sure he heard everything I said. He looked at me, looked at the bill, picked it up, and looking me straight in the eyes, he tore the bill in half. I just said thank-you as I nodded my head once, turned, and left.
    To ME the look he communicated to me was sort of, "How could you possibly have known that? You were under anesthesia!"

    It never occurred to me that he should be reported; I was young and was simply happy with not having to pay that bill.

    So, all that to say, yeah, there are doctors everyday who try to get away with padding their income. Not all, but you do hear or read about medical practices getting caught trying to defraud Medicare/Medicaid.

    I also know of a big, booming nursing-temp business that had a Financial Officer doing the same thing. It nearly tanked the business, but now it is a small business with barely any redeeming qualities. How the mighty have fallen. How people think they can get away with it is beyond me.

    If I was employed where you are, it would also make me suspicious of the way the doc seems to conduct business. If he got caught doing what you think he's doing, there would be an investigation; how would you explain your 'part' in it, as in: if you knew, why didn't you report him...or were you two in collusion? THAT possibility right there would give me pause and not just nudge me, but PUSH me to find another job, pronto!

  • Jun 21

    Quote from purplegal
    I basically work 29-30 out of 30 or 31 days of the month.
    That one sentence explains everything!
    .....Whew! It exhausts me just to even briefly contemplate working such a schedule!

  • Jun 21

    Quote from purplegal
    I basically work 29-30 out of 30 or 31 days of the month.
    That one sentence explains everything!
    .....Whew! It exhausts me just to even briefly contemplate working such a schedule!


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