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BostonFNP Guide 42,972 Views

Joined Apr 4, '11 - from 'Northshore, MA'. BostonFNP is a Primary Care NP. Posts: 4,716 (61% Liked) Likes: 11,433

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  • Jun 20

    Quote from WestCoastSunRN
    Thanks everyone! Boston --- I really like your idea of working on the DNP more organically (if that makes sense) during my FNP career. That said, my local university of choice no longer offers an MSN option for FNP. Because I do desire the terminal degree for the potential opportunities it could allow in the future and because I am not getting younger (it's time to fish or cut bait on grad school in general) and because of the way the program is laid out in a way that works best with my family situation over the next 4 years, I am willing to go ahead and pull the trigger on the DNP sooner rather than later. I also appreciate what you point out about the difference between the didactic teaching vs. clinical. I think I could be happy teaching undergrads didactically. I think eventually I will feel that way about NP students, but also be drawn to clinically precepting students. But that is yet outside my wheelhouse. In the meantime --- thanks for your thoughtful responses. It is good to know there are options for me in academia. If I'm so fortunate, I hope to leave my mark in nursing in more ways than one. I've focused on the bedside for so many years -- at this moment in time it's all I know and it's hard to think about leaving it behind -- because I am still passionate about it even though I also want to move on to new things.
    If your chosen program is already DNP then the price likely isn't much more than the MSN program was and perhaps it doesn't make much difference. Getting involved in clinical education at the NP level is very rewarding if done correctly and helps your practice as well.

  • Jun 19

    I can't help with your specifics, but I would say: only invest in becoming an NP if you have a desire for the role. If you do it for the money you will more than likely be disappointed.

    Good luck, I'm sure someone here can give you some specifics on your area. Florida is a notoriously hard state for NPs to practice in.

  • Jun 19

    Retail health is a up-and-coming market. I know colleagues that have used it as a stepping stone to great NP jobs and I know colleagues that remained in retail health and absolutely love it.

    There is absolutely nothing "wrong" with it.

  • Jun 17

    When reading through the responses to your post, keep in mind that (like many other hotly debated political topics) many people have passionate opinions, and not all passionate opinions come from a position of experience or perspective.

    Here is my two cents:


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Hello,
    I am weighing the options of going into nursing. However, I would want to become a Nurse Practitioner as soon as possible.
    It is far more helpful to know "why" you want to be a NP and "why" you want it as soon as possible. Have you spent time shadowing NPs in different settings?

    Keep in mind that (largely) cheap-fast-and-easy is often not the best path when establishing a foundation for a career. That includes everything from your researching a career change through your ultimate education/preparation to your ultimate practice.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    I already have a non-nursing related bachelor/master degree in education so this would be a career change. I currently work full-time for local government.
    Nursing school at any level is a large financial and time commitment. Make sure you do your research about the time and money you will need to invest and the reward for doing so: salary, benefits, work schedule. If you work in government and you have a pension, discuss it with your financial planner about what makes sense for you long-term.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Would I need to complete my RN first and then on to earn the Nurse Practitioner license?
    First, remember, programs grant degrees not licenses. All students NPs must hold an active RN license while doing clinical rotations: you must complete an accredited RN program, successfully past the national board exam (NCLEX), and meet the criteria to be licensed in your state.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Does anyone have any idea if there are programs that a designed for this or do most Nurse practitioners need work experience as an RN before moving on?
    There are direct entry NP programs: programs designed to take individuals with prior degrees and move them along an accelerated path towards advanced practice nursing (APN). These program are both accredited RN programs and accredited APN programs combined in one (you will still need to follow the path as above). Some of these program require 1-2 years of RN experience during the graduate part of the program, others do not. These are typically long-established programs with strict admission criteria, though there are some less desirable programs popping up.

    As far as whether RN experience is "needed", that is up for considerable debate. There is some published data on the topic but it is sparse. From my experience (as a practicing NP and didactic/clinical educator), it varies tremendously on the individual. For the vast majority, RN experience seems helpful.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    And if so, do most Nurse Practitioner positions require experience?
    So do, some don't. This is where your research is of critical importance: you need to spent time shadowing local NPs and find out what the local job market and hiring practices are like, what programs are preferred, what experience is required, etc.

    Quote from jodyjcj
    How many hours do most NP's work?
    This varies tremendously based on the setting. I would venture, on average, the work week for most NPs is salary 40-50+ hours, while RNs is likely closer to hourly 36 plus overtime.

  • Jun 17

    Quote from beachmom
    This was a night shift nurse's note in a LTC facility. "No pulse, no BP. Will keep comfortable."

    She left the next morning, saying nothing about it to the day shift. Day shift CNA, of course, found pt. dead. The nurse was let go. I always wondered what the official time of death was, and if the facility told the family about this.
    Was this pt CMO and the nurse was documenting to keep comfortable and not take pulse and BP anymore?

  • Jun 17

    What's your plan with how you are going to do clinical hours and still work?

  • Jun 16

    Retail health is a up-and-coming market. I know colleagues that have used it as a stepping stone to great NP jobs and I know colleagues that remained in retail health and absolutely love it.

    There is absolutely nothing "wrong" with it.

  • Jun 16

    Retail health is a up-and-coming market. I know colleagues that have used it as a stepping stone to great NP jobs and I know colleagues that remained in retail health and absolutely love it.

    There is absolutely nothing "wrong" with it.

  • Jun 16

    Retail health is a up-and-coming market. I know colleagues that have used it as a stepping stone to great NP jobs and I know colleagues that remained in retail health and absolutely love it.

    There is absolutely nothing "wrong" with it.

  • Jun 15

    When reading through the responses to your post, keep in mind that (like many other hotly debated political topics) many people have passionate opinions, and not all passionate opinions come from a position of experience or perspective.

    Here is my two cents:


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Hello,
    I am weighing the options of going into nursing. However, I would want to become a Nurse Practitioner as soon as possible.
    It is far more helpful to know "why" you want to be a NP and "why" you want it as soon as possible. Have you spent time shadowing NPs in different settings?

    Keep in mind that (largely) cheap-fast-and-easy is often not the best path when establishing a foundation for a career. That includes everything from your researching a career change through your ultimate education/preparation to your ultimate practice.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    I already have a non-nursing related bachelor/master degree in education so this would be a career change. I currently work full-time for local government.
    Nursing school at any level is a large financial and time commitment. Make sure you do your research about the time and money you will need to invest and the reward for doing so: salary, benefits, work schedule. If you work in government and you have a pension, discuss it with your financial planner about what makes sense for you long-term.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Would I need to complete my RN first and then on to earn the Nurse Practitioner license?
    First, remember, programs grant degrees not licenses. All students NPs must hold an active RN license while doing clinical rotations: you must complete an accredited RN program, successfully past the national board exam (NCLEX), and meet the criteria to be licensed in your state.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Does anyone have any idea if there are programs that a designed for this or do most Nurse practitioners need work experience as an RN before moving on?
    There are direct entry NP programs: programs designed to take individuals with prior degrees and move them along an accelerated path towards advanced practice nursing (APN). These program are both accredited RN programs and accredited APN programs combined in one (you will still need to follow the path as above). Some of these program require 1-2 years of RN experience during the graduate part of the program, others do not. These are typically long-established programs with strict admission criteria, though there are some less desirable programs popping up.

    As far as whether RN experience is "needed", that is up for considerable debate. There is some published data on the topic but it is sparse. From my experience (as a practicing NP and didactic/clinical educator), it varies tremendously on the individual. For the vast majority, RN experience seems helpful.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    And if so, do most Nurse Practitioner positions require experience?
    So do, some don't. This is where your research is of critical importance: you need to spent time shadowing local NPs and find out what the local job market and hiring practices are like, what programs are preferred, what experience is required, etc.

    Quote from jodyjcj
    How many hours do most NP's work?
    This varies tremendously based on the setting. I would venture, on average, the work week for most NPs is salary 40-50+ hours, while RNs is likely closer to hourly 36 plus overtime.

  • Jun 14

    When reading through the responses to your post, keep in mind that (like many other hotly debated political topics) many people have passionate opinions, and not all passionate opinions come from a position of experience or perspective.

    Here is my two cents:


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Hello,
    I am weighing the options of going into nursing. However, I would want to become a Nurse Practitioner as soon as possible.
    It is far more helpful to know "why" you want to be a NP and "why" you want it as soon as possible. Have you spent time shadowing NPs in different settings?

    Keep in mind that (largely) cheap-fast-and-easy is often not the best path when establishing a foundation for a career. That includes everything from your researching a career change through your ultimate education/preparation to your ultimate practice.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    I already have a non-nursing related bachelor/master degree in education so this would be a career change. I currently work full-time for local government.
    Nursing school at any level is a large financial and time commitment. Make sure you do your research about the time and money you will need to invest and the reward for doing so: salary, benefits, work schedule. If you work in government and you have a pension, discuss it with your financial planner about what makes sense for you long-term.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Would I need to complete my RN first and then on to earn the Nurse Practitioner license?
    First, remember, programs grant degrees not licenses. All students NPs must hold an active RN license while doing clinical rotations: you must complete an accredited RN program, successfully past the national board exam (NCLEX), and meet the criteria to be licensed in your state.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Does anyone have any idea if there are programs that a designed for this or do most Nurse practitioners need work experience as an RN before moving on?
    There are direct entry NP programs: programs designed to take individuals with prior degrees and move them along an accelerated path towards advanced practice nursing (APN). These program are both accredited RN programs and accredited APN programs combined in one (you will still need to follow the path as above). Some of these program require 1-2 years of RN experience during the graduate part of the program, others do not. These are typically long-established programs with strict admission criteria, though there are some less desirable programs popping up.

    As far as whether RN experience is "needed", that is up for considerable debate. There is some published data on the topic but it is sparse. From my experience (as a practicing NP and didactic/clinical educator), it varies tremendously on the individual. For the vast majority, RN experience seems helpful.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    And if so, do most Nurse Practitioner positions require experience?
    So do, some don't. This is where your research is of critical importance: you need to spent time shadowing local NPs and find out what the local job market and hiring practices are like, what programs are preferred, what experience is required, etc.

    Quote from jodyjcj
    How many hours do most NP's work?
    This varies tremendously based on the setting. I would venture, on average, the work week for most NPs is salary 40-50+ hours, while RNs is likely closer to hourly 36 plus overtime.

  • Jun 14

    When reading through the responses to your post, keep in mind that (like many other hotly debated political topics) many people have passionate opinions, and not all passionate opinions come from a position of experience or perspective.

    Here is my two cents:


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Hello,
    I am weighing the options of going into nursing. However, I would want to become a Nurse Practitioner as soon as possible.
    It is far more helpful to know "why" you want to be a NP and "why" you want it as soon as possible. Have you spent time shadowing NPs in different settings?

    Keep in mind that (largely) cheap-fast-and-easy is often not the best path when establishing a foundation for a career. That includes everything from your researching a career change through your ultimate education/preparation to your ultimate practice.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    I already have a non-nursing related bachelor/master degree in education so this would be a career change. I currently work full-time for local government.
    Nursing school at any level is a large financial and time commitment. Make sure you do your research about the time and money you will need to invest and the reward for doing so: salary, benefits, work schedule. If you work in government and you have a pension, discuss it with your financial planner about what makes sense for you long-term.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Would I need to complete my RN first and then on to earn the Nurse Practitioner license?
    First, remember, programs grant degrees not licenses. All students NPs must hold an active RN license while doing clinical rotations: you must complete an accredited RN program, successfully past the national board exam (NCLEX), and meet the criteria to be licensed in your state.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Does anyone have any idea if there are programs that a designed for this or do most Nurse practitioners need work experience as an RN before moving on?
    There are direct entry NP programs: programs designed to take individuals with prior degrees and move them along an accelerated path towards advanced practice nursing (APN). These program are both accredited RN programs and accredited APN programs combined in one (you will still need to follow the path as above). Some of these program require 1-2 years of RN experience during the graduate part of the program, others do not. These are typically long-established programs with strict admission criteria, though there are some less desirable programs popping up.

    As far as whether RN experience is "needed", that is up for considerable debate. There is some published data on the topic but it is sparse. From my experience (as a practicing NP and didactic/clinical educator), it varies tremendously on the individual. For the vast majority, RN experience seems helpful.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    And if so, do most Nurse Practitioner positions require experience?
    So do, some don't. This is where your research is of critical importance: you need to spent time shadowing local NPs and find out what the local job market and hiring practices are like, what programs are preferred, what experience is required, etc.

    Quote from jodyjcj
    How many hours do most NP's work?
    This varies tremendously based on the setting. I would venture, on average, the work week for most NPs is salary 40-50+ hours, while RNs is likely closer to hourly 36 plus overtime.

  • Jun 14

    When reading through the responses to your post, keep in mind that (like many other hotly debated political topics) many people have passionate opinions, and not all passionate opinions come from a position of experience or perspective.

    Here is my two cents:


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Hello,
    I am weighing the options of going into nursing. However, I would want to become a Nurse Practitioner as soon as possible.
    It is far more helpful to know "why" you want to be a NP and "why" you want it as soon as possible. Have you spent time shadowing NPs in different settings?

    Keep in mind that (largely) cheap-fast-and-easy is often not the best path when establishing a foundation for a career. That includes everything from your researching a career change through your ultimate education/preparation to your ultimate practice.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    I already have a non-nursing related bachelor/master degree in education so this would be a career change. I currently work full-time for local government.
    Nursing school at any level is a large financial and time commitment. Make sure you do your research about the time and money you will need to invest and the reward for doing so: salary, benefits, work schedule. If you work in government and you have a pension, discuss it with your financial planner about what makes sense for you long-term.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Would I need to complete my RN first and then on to earn the Nurse Practitioner license?
    First, remember, programs grant degrees not licenses. All students NPs must hold an active RN license while doing clinical rotations: you must complete an accredited RN program, successfully past the national board exam (NCLEX), and meet the criteria to be licensed in your state.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Does anyone have any idea if there are programs that a designed for this or do most Nurse practitioners need work experience as an RN before moving on?
    There are direct entry NP programs: programs designed to take individuals with prior degrees and move them along an accelerated path towards advanced practice nursing (APN). These program are both accredited RN programs and accredited APN programs combined in one (you will still need to follow the path as above). Some of these program require 1-2 years of RN experience during the graduate part of the program, others do not. These are typically long-established programs with strict admission criteria, though there are some less desirable programs popping up.

    As far as whether RN experience is "needed", that is up for considerable debate. There is some published data on the topic but it is sparse. From my experience (as a practicing NP and didactic/clinical educator), it varies tremendously on the individual. For the vast majority, RN experience seems helpful.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    And if so, do most Nurse Practitioner positions require experience?
    So do, some don't. This is where your research is of critical importance: you need to spent time shadowing local NPs and find out what the local job market and hiring practices are like, what programs are preferred, what experience is required, etc.

    Quote from jodyjcj
    How many hours do most NP's work?
    This varies tremendously based on the setting. I would venture, on average, the work week for most NPs is salary 40-50+ hours, while RNs is likely closer to hourly 36 plus overtime.

  • Jun 14

    When reading through the responses to your post, keep in mind that (like many other hotly debated political topics) many people have passionate opinions, and not all passionate opinions come from a position of experience or perspective.

    Here is my two cents:


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Hello,
    I am weighing the options of going into nursing. However, I would want to become a Nurse Practitioner as soon as possible.
    It is far more helpful to know "why" you want to be a NP and "why" you want it as soon as possible. Have you spent time shadowing NPs in different settings?

    Keep in mind that (largely) cheap-fast-and-easy is often not the best path when establishing a foundation for a career. That includes everything from your researching a career change through your ultimate education/preparation to your ultimate practice.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    I already have a non-nursing related bachelor/master degree in education so this would be a career change. I currently work full-time for local government.
    Nursing school at any level is a large financial and time commitment. Make sure you do your research about the time and money you will need to invest and the reward for doing so: salary, benefits, work schedule. If you work in government and you have a pension, discuss it with your financial planner about what makes sense for you long-term.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Would I need to complete my RN first and then on to earn the Nurse Practitioner license?
    First, remember, programs grant degrees not licenses. All students NPs must hold an active RN license while doing clinical rotations: you must complete an accredited RN program, successfully past the national board exam (NCLEX), and meet the criteria to be licensed in your state.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    Does anyone have any idea if there are programs that a designed for this or do most Nurse practitioners need work experience as an RN before moving on?
    There are direct entry NP programs: programs designed to take individuals with prior degrees and move them along an accelerated path towards advanced practice nursing (APN). These program are both accredited RN programs and accredited APN programs combined in one (you will still need to follow the path as above). Some of these program require 1-2 years of RN experience during the graduate part of the program, others do not. These are typically long-established programs with strict admission criteria, though there are some less desirable programs popping up.

    As far as whether RN experience is "needed", that is up for considerable debate. There is some published data on the topic but it is sparse. From my experience (as a practicing NP and didactic/clinical educator), it varies tremendously on the individual. For the vast majority, RN experience seems helpful.


    Quote from jodyjcj
    And if so, do most Nurse Practitioner positions require experience?
    So do, some don't. This is where your research is of critical importance: you need to spent time shadowing local NPs and find out what the local job market and hiring practices are like, what programs are preferred, what experience is required, etc.

    Quote from jodyjcj
    How many hours do most NP's work?
    This varies tremendously based on the setting. I would venture, on average, the work week for most NPs is salary 40-50+ hours, while RNs is likely closer to hourly 36 plus overtime.

  • Jun 13

    You are a long way from figuring out which path is best for you: it's a big investment, don't put the cart before the horse.


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