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Joined: Apr 4, '11; Posts: 5,246 (63% Liked) ; Likes: 13,345

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  • May 24

    I don't know any state that will allow you to either obtain an APN license while on a restricted RN license or work on an APN license with a revoked RN license.

    From the CA BON:

    IV. REPORTING PRIOR CONVICTIONS OR DISCIPLINE AGAINST LICENSES/CERTIFICATES
    Applicants are required under law to report all misdemeanor and felony convictions. "Driving under the influence"
    convictions must be reported. Convictions must be reported even if they have been adjudicated, dismissed or expunged
    or even if a court ordered diversion program has been completed under the Penal Code or under Article 5 of the Vehicle
    Code. Also, all disciplinary action against an applicant's nurse practitioner, registered nurse, practical nurse, vocational
    nurse or other health care related license or certificate must be reported. Also any fine, infraction, or traffic violation over
    $1,000.00 must be reported.
    Failure to report prior convictions or disciplinary action is considered falsification of application and is grounds
    for denial of licensure/certification or revocation of license/certificate.
    When reporting prior convictions or disciplinary action, applicants are required to provide a full written explanation of:
    circumstances surrounding the arrest(s), conviction(s), and/or disciplinary action(s); the date of incident(s), conviction(s)
    or disciplinary action(s); specific violation(s) (cite section of law if convicted), court location or jurisdiction, sanctions or
    penalties imposed and completion dates. Provide certified copies of arrest and court documents and for disciplinary
    proceedings against any license as a RN or any health-care related license; include copies of state board
    determinations/decisions, citations and letters of reprimand.
    NOTE: For drug and alcohol convictions include documents that indicate blood alcohol content (BAC) and sobriety date.
    To make a determination in these cases, the Board considers the nature and severity of the offense, additional
    subsequent acts, recency of acts or crimes, compliance with court sanctions, and evidence of rehabilitation.

  • May 23

    I agree with you that there are several failures in NP education right now, and that those are affecting both students and practicing NPs.

    Re: preceptorships. I don't know of a single NP program that would tell students that perceptorships are not vitally important to their preparation, yet many programs (good programs included) have moved away from securing quality preceptorships. There is only one explanation for this and it is money. Perceptorships have become the largest bottleneck for NP programs and rather than admitting less students or hiring more clinical placement laisons, programs have decided that they have plenty of students applying so they can just transfer that responsibility on to students. There is no way to argue that this is good practice, but even quality programs have gone this route. You can not judge quality of program by this factor alone, though I would argue that if a program does secure preceptorships than it is more likely than not to be a quality program (and probably also more expensive of a program).

    Re: B&M vs online vs hybrid programs. Again, quality of a program can't be judged on this alone. The didactic learning can take place online and there is some research to prove this. Synchronous vs asynchronous is another debate and it does seem most quality program use synchronous, or at least a mix of the two. I believe (having taught both in traditional B&M and in a hybrid/online model) that there are intangibles to B&M learning which are important to the overall preparedness of novice NPs, but I don't have any hard data on that. Site visits can be more (skills workshops, H&P demos, simulations, etc) or less (administrative, orientation, social) useful for students. I do believe that technical skills can be learned post-graduate.

    Re: experience. This we disagree on, at least as something mandatory. Working as an RN shouldn't be a "holding pattern" for those wanting to move to the APRN role (like post-docs in academia). There is also a misconception that there is a progression of expertise from novice RN to expert RN to novice NP to expert NP; RN expertise is independent of NP education/experience/expertise. In my professional experience there have been students without RN experience that definitely need to get some before graduating as an NP (though to be fully honest they were probably not going to be great RNs either) and some expert and experienced RNs that no amount of experience/expertise was going to make them a good NP. Having taught students and hired/trained novice NPs I have never felt I could accurate predict their successful role transition based on their prior RN experience (or lack of). I admit I likely have some bias on this issue because I only work with a single high-quality NP program that has very strict/competitive admissions criteria for their direct-entry students.

    In the end, there are lots of crappy programs out there that should be shut down to make room for the quality programs. I am willing to wager if we dropped the bottom 1/3rd of NP programs, the quality programs would go back to controlling preceptorships and students would get a better education. It['s hard to shut these programs down when they are making lots of money and have plenty of students to fill the coffers. It needs to come either from regulatory side with pressure from practicing NPs or by increasing the difficulty of the board cert exams.

  • May 23

    In my opinion, students should stop funding programs that don't secure preceptors for students. It is terrible practice.

  • May 23

    Quote from Rebeccakb
    I'm planning on continuing my education. My work offers more tuition assistance to a college that offers a family nurse practitioner degree. My ideal job would be working with the geriatrics population. Can a nurse with a family nurse practitioner degree get hired in a geriatrician's office, long term care facility or hospice? Or would I need an adult focused degree? I really would not want to work with children or younger adults.
    You can work in those roles with either an FNP or an AGPCNP. If you don't want to see children ever then you can focus your learning with the latter, the question would be if it is worth it to you to spend your own money to do that vs your company's money.

  • May 23

    Quote from Rebeccakb
    I'm planning on continuing my education. My work offers more tuition assistance to a college that offers a family nurse practitioner degree. My ideal job would be working with the geriatrics population. Can a nurse with a family nurse practitioner degree get hired in a geriatrician's office, long term care facility or hospice? Or would I need an adult focused degree? I really would not want to work with children or younger adults.
    You can work in those roles with either an FNP or an AGPCNP. If you don't want to see children ever then you can focus your learning with the latter, the question would be if it is worth it to you to spend your own money to do that vs your company's money.

  • May 23

    Quote from Jules A
    Excellent advice although that entire specialty raises red flags for me. Is there actually research that supports the health risks vs benefits and results in long term improvement?
    I think the majority of that specialty falls into shades of sketch.

    I have never seen good outcomes data on pure pharmacotherapy for the long-term. Ironically the best weight-loss meds we have now are diabetes meds and it won't be long before we see most of them being used off-label I bet (some are already on-label at different doses).

  • May 23

    Remember that your state may require to use a specific credential when signing official paperwork and this is entirely separate from your board cert credentials.

  • May 22

    Quote from wayemika
    How does this work? do you know of any schools that offer credits if you precept?
    Many NP programs offer vouchers that can be used towards academic credits for precepting NP students. Some you have to ask for it, some will just automatically offer it, when you are contacted to precept, ask! Most schools call this a professional development voucher.

  • May 22

    Quote from wayemika
    How does this work? do you know of any schools that offer credits if you precept?
    Many NP programs offer vouchers that can be used towards academic credits for precepting NP students. Some you have to ask for it, some will just automatically offer it, when you are contacted to precept, ask! Most schools call this a professional development voucher.

  • May 22

    Don't go from one bad program to another, do your research beforehand!

    Laboure's pass rates have been abysmal as well: 60%, 64%, 59%, and most recently 79%. The national average is 87%.

  • May 18

    Quote from ccw123
    My current goal is to work as an RN for a year or two, hopefully while getting some FNP experience through part time volunteer work or working in some place like a minute clinic-- and then apply to a residency and hope for the best.
    I some ways I'd advise against swapping back and going to work as an RN for a few years. I do think the retail health pathway is a good one for you based on what you've said.

  • May 18

    Have you thoughts about retail health? Good pay, very structured and limited workflow, excellent support.

  • May 18

    You want to use all the network contacts you have, the best jobs are never even posted, and experience is often a desire but not a requirement.

    Have you contacted your school alumni association? Your state NP association? Your previous clinical instructors?

  • May 18

    Quote from djmatte
    Arguably only if you are a product of a DE background.
    I missed part of the quoted text, but I meant more generally the notion that one person is more qualified simply because they "put their time in". It extends far beyond DEs and speaks to the fact that one of the biggest hurdles a novice NP faces is other nurses.

    Additionally in-fighting (especially that which is based on a mixture of personal pride, ignorance, and bias) weakens the profession as whole.

  • May 18

    Quote from djmatte
    Arguably only if you are a product of a DE background.
    I missed part of the quoted text, but I meant more generally the notion that one person is more qualified simply because they "put their time in". It extends far beyond DEs and speaks to the fact that one of the biggest hurdles a novice NP faces is other nurses.

    Additionally in-fighting (especially that which is based on a mixture of personal pride, ignorance, and bias) weakens the profession as whole.


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