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Joined Apr 4, '11 - from 'Northshore, MA'. BostonFNP is a Primary Care NP. Posts: 4,753 (61% Liked) Likes: 11,551

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  • Aug 22

    To be honest, you are taking a pretty large personal and financial risk here, if your end goal is to work in a major academic medical center. The truth is, without having excellent networking contacts or extensive experience, you are going to have a difficult time finding work in a major academic center (and likely in an hospital setting in the metro area).

    Remember, the BON deals with the education requirements to sit for the NCLEX and to obtain licensure in the state (board approval), they do not handle individual program accreditation via national bodies. Provided the program remains accredited it won't keep you from continuing your education, but if it drops approval you will not be able to take the NCLEX or get licensed.

    There are four ADN-RN programs in MA that are under board approval warning, all for persistently elevated failure rates on the NCLEX. For example, Labore and Quincy had board pass rates in 2016 that were abysmal at under 60%. Don't waste your time and money would be my advice.

  • Aug 18

    Quote from mw73
    It seems that the majority of the comments indicate that nursing is a highly stressful career. Are any of the posters that have commented about this NPs in private practice?
    I believe some of the prior posters are NPs and others are student NPs or RNs.

    I am a private practice NP. Nursing is a stressful career. Nursing at the APN level is perhaps less physically stressful and more mentally stressful. You are responsible for the life of 1500-3000+ people in a job where one miss or one mistake could significantly impact the quality or quantity of life in any one of those people. Additionally, there is a significant amount of administrative red tape which is also stressful. As is just dealing with people at times

  • Aug 17

    Quote from ILUVERNSG
    Personally, I feel that the mandatory flu shot is a violation of my right to choose what happens to my body. The flu shot is not without risk.
    Is flu without risk?

  • Aug 17

    The biggest tip I can give is to focus on learning the mechanisms and physiology rather than trying to memorize things with study aides. But I can give you some simple memory aides.

    Adrenergic receptors are part of the sympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system is responsible for the fight or flight response. Remember that ADRENergic is like ADRENaline. If you stimulate or agonize these receptors you prepare the body for fight-flight. If you antagonize or block them you have the opposite effect.

    Simple way to think of alpha receptors. Alpha is for Arteries. If you give an alpha-blocker/antagonist it calms the body down from a fight so the arteries dilate and BP drops. Also remember that you don't want to pee your pants when you fight!

    A simple way to think of beta receptors. You have two lungs and one heart. Beta-2 goes with your two lungs. Beta-1 goes with your heart.

    You can then rationalize the functions of the drug. If you agonize the beta-2 receptors in your lungs you get them ready to fight: the bronchioles dilate. If you antagonize beta-1 receptors in the heart you calm the heart down from flight and the heart rate slows down and your BP drops.

    Apply the same method to the main receptor of the parasympathetic nervous system, the cholenergic receptor.

    The most Important ones to remember in this group are the antagonists, the anticholenergics. Think of the effects of these by the old medical adage of "can't see, can't pee, can't spit, can't s**t".

  • Aug 15

    Quote from aknurse68
    I am an RN with no BSN thinking of going back to school for FNP. I have aprox 20 yrs as an RN and am 49 yrs old. I'm looking at this as a " second" career after my kids are done with school. ( my youngest is just entering 7th grade).

    Questions:

    1. Is this something I should even consider at my age?
    2. What's the fastest/cheapest track?
    3. What's your recommendation for online school?


    Thanks in advance!
    1. Sure! You could easily work into your 70s in the APN role, should you choose to do that. One thing you'd have to consider is if you could reduce your current hours while in school, or even stop altogether/go per diem.

    2 and 3. You are making an investment of your time and your money so invest wisely. Do your research and find the best possible program. The fast, cheap, and easy path is often not the best path for a good investment. Talk to local NPs and local employers and see what they prefer to hire. Choosing the quick/easy/cheap path could really come back to hurt you in the end.

  • Aug 15

    Quote from aknurse68
    I am an RN with no BSN thinking of going back to school for FNP. I have aprox 20 yrs as an RN and am 49 yrs old. I'm looking at this as a " second" career after my kids are done with school. ( my youngest is just entering 7th grade).

    Questions:

    1. Is this something I should even consider at my age?
    2. What's the fastest/cheapest track?
    3. What's your recommendation for online school?


    Thanks in advance!
    1. Sure! You could easily work into your 70s in the APN role, should you choose to do that. One thing you'd have to consider is if you could reduce your current hours while in school, or even stop altogether/go per diem.

    2 and 3. You are making an investment of your time and your money so invest wisely. Do your research and find the best possible program. The fast, cheap, and easy path is often not the best path for a good investment. Talk to local NPs and local employers and see what they prefer to hire. Choosing the quick/easy/cheap path could really come back to hurt you in the end.

  • Aug 15

    Quote from aknurse68
    I am an RN with no BSN thinking of going back to school for FNP. I have aprox 20 yrs as an RN and am 49 yrs old. I'm looking at this as a " second" career after my kids are done with school. ( my youngest is just entering 7th grade).

    Questions:

    1. Is this something I should even consider at my age?
    2. What's the fastest/cheapest track?
    3. What's your recommendation for online school?


    Thanks in advance!
    1. Sure! You could easily work into your 70s in the APN role, should you choose to do that. One thing you'd have to consider is if you could reduce your current hours while in school, or even stop altogether/go per diem.

    2 and 3. You are making an investment of your time and your money so invest wisely. Do your research and find the best possible program. The fast, cheap, and easy path is often not the best path for a good investment. Talk to local NPs and local employers and see what they prefer to hire. Choosing the quick/easy/cheap path could really come back to hurt you in the end.

  • Aug 14

    Cost should not be your top priority, there are many more important things to consider.

  • Aug 11

    Stay where you are and with what you know for now. Learning another new role while also trying to learn the NP role, IMHO, is counterproductive.

  • Aug 6

    Quote from Cococure
    BostonFNP I am in my 4th semester of my part time program and I start clinicals in the spring and I hated the fact that I had to find my own sites ..that is a whole other debate unto it self.
    In my opinion is is a central part of the current debate: APN programs which have stopped securing clinical sites, in simple terms, are telling every student that they care more about money than they do about their education. The quality of the clinical portion of NP education is vital to the overall quality of the novice NP that is produced and the fact that many programs have given up control of this astounds me. We can follow the money on that one and it is fairly clear why programs are doing this in increasing numbers.

    That being said, you also have quite a ways to go and haven't really gotten into the major part of your advanced practice education, which in my opinion, begins with the start of clinical rotations and the associated didactics. It might get better for you shortly.

  • Aug 6

    Quote from Cococure
    BostonFNP I am in my 4th semester of my part time program and I start clinicals in the spring and I hated the fact that I had to find my own sites ..that is a whole other debate unto it self.
    In my opinion is is a central part of the current debate: APN programs which have stopped securing clinical sites, in simple terms, are telling every student that they care more about money than they do about their education. The quality of the clinical portion of NP education is vital to the overall quality of the novice NP that is produced and the fact that many programs have given up control of this astounds me. We can follow the money on that one and it is fairly clear why programs are doing this in increasing numbers.

    That being said, you also have quite a ways to go and haven't really gotten into the major part of your advanced practice education, which in my opinion, begins with the start of clinical rotations and the associated didactics. It might get better for you shortly.

  • Aug 6

    Quote from LouBean
    However, my disappointment with nursing "academia" began in my BSN education -- and I do believe some of the downfalls of conventional undergraduate nursing inform these NP programs in a significant way.
    This is an interesting point that I have discussed with program planning: if we are going to have DE program which are designed to take talented applicants and prepare them, in an accelerated way, for advanced practice without requiring RN experience, then why do they typically spend nearly 50% of the entire program teaching undergraduate nursing from undergraduate professors then try and make an abrupt turn to graduate level work often repeating the same material at two different levels. Wouldn't it better serve everyone to start teaching advanced practice from day 1?

  • Aug 6

    Quote from Cococure
    BostonFNP I am in my 4th semester of my part time program and I start clinicals in the spring and I hated the fact that I had to find my own sites ..that is a whole other debate unto it self.
    In my opinion is is a central part of the current debate: APN programs which have stopped securing clinical sites, in simple terms, are telling every student that they care more about money than they do about their education. The quality of the clinical portion of NP education is vital to the overall quality of the novice NP that is produced and the fact that many programs have given up control of this astounds me. We can follow the money on that one and it is fairly clear why programs are doing this in increasing numbers.

    That being said, you also have quite a ways to go and haven't really gotten into the major part of your advanced practice education, which in my opinion, begins with the start of clinical rotations and the associated didactics. It might get better for you shortly.

  • Aug 6

    Quote from Cococure
    BostonFNP I am in my 4th semester of my part time program and I start clinicals in the spring and I hated the fact that I had to find my own sites ..that is a whole other debate unto it self.
    In my opinion is is a central part of the current debate: APN programs which have stopped securing clinical sites, in simple terms, are telling every student that they care more about money than they do about their education. The quality of the clinical portion of NP education is vital to the overall quality of the novice NP that is produced and the fact that many programs have given up control of this astounds me. We can follow the money on that one and it is fairly clear why programs are doing this in increasing numbers.

    That being said, you also have quite a ways to go and haven't really gotten into the major part of your advanced practice education, which in my opinion, begins with the start of clinical rotations and the associated didactics. It might get better for you shortly.

  • Aug 6

    Quote from Cococure
    BostonFNP I am in my 4th semester of my part time program and I start clinicals in the spring and I hated the fact that I had to find my own sites ..that is a whole other debate unto it self.
    In my opinion is is a central part of the current debate: APN programs which have stopped securing clinical sites, in simple terms, are telling every student that they care more about money than they do about their education. The quality of the clinical portion of NP education is vital to the overall quality of the novice NP that is produced and the fact that many programs have given up control of this astounds me. We can follow the money on that one and it is fairly clear why programs are doing this in increasing numbers.

    That being said, you also have quite a ways to go and haven't really gotten into the major part of your advanced practice education, which in my opinion, begins with the start of clinical rotations and the associated didactics. It might get better for you shortly.


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