Latest Comments by emsboss - page 15

emsboss 4,485 Views

Joined Aug 2, '04. Posts: 231 (19% Liked) Likes: 145

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    I have not heard of the "APLS". I am a "PALS" instructor and have been since the late '80s. About 1989, I think. If there is ANY way I can help ANYONE I will do my best.

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    As a paramedic (20+ years) going into the RN field, I graduate December 17th, BTW. I am going to keep BOTH certifications, RNCENCCRNNREMTP called it right. Being certified in both allows you to "mix" skills and be more helpful in the ED. If you are interested in flight medicine, it will work here too. GOOD LUCK!!!

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    LEFTY!!!!!!!...Quite an advantage in the back of an ambulance . I have noticed that a LOT of Healthcare workers are lefties ...BTW!!!! Did you know that every person in the world is born left handed...AND...We stay that way until we commit our first sin!!!!!!!!!...hehehehehehehe (just jokin')

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    Quote from 46yrsbacktoschool
    I have been given a question for an exam and need an answer to it can anyone help? the question is... "most medications are referred to in 3 different ways... what are they?"
    Sorry for this but I am getting older and finding study harder!
    Maybe...Brand name (always capitalized)...generic (never capitalized) and chemical?

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    Penelope_Pitstop likes this.

    Responded to a "belly pain" one night in beautiful WVa...18y/o female c/o lower abdominal pain. While enroute I asked the usual barrage of questions and got to the one I was dreading..."could you be pregnant?" (she was married...not that it mattered, we have to ask, anyway) She answered in a serious voice "of course not, we have been using the other hole." OMG!!!!!!!...She was SERIOUS!!!!!!!!!! She was also pregnant with an ectopic pregnancy

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    Saw a P.A. once, fresh out of ACLS that defibrillated a live patient. This guy came in with chest pain/dyspnea, so she took him to a monitor room. After she hooked him up she saw "V-fib" on the monitor, shouted for help and busted him with 200j. Never checked the patient. Turns out he had a hx of Parkinson's. She never finished her shift.:uhoh21:

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    All good advice Sprinter...I am 41 and work in EMS...Going into nursing (graduate on 17 Dec., 2004) with several back injuries over the years. Correct body mechs and GOOD shoes are paramount!!!!!!!!!...GOOD LUCK!!!!!!!!!

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    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Sounds like something was added to your drink(s).
    I agree, snoopy...I would see about having a drug/tox screen drawn to cover you in case of a random drug screening. I may be a little (lot) paranoid about it, but, you never know.

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    [QUOTE=lizz]Ok, we've just switched doctors under our medical plan. So I go in for a routine checkup, etc. at this clinic. They tell me the nurse will be with me shortly. Of course, since I'm a student, I always ask nurses how they like their jobs etc. So I ask: You're a nurse, right? She nods. How do you like the job ... blah, blah blah ... Not once did she correct me. Then I ask where she went to school. When she names the school, I'm confused because I've never heard of it.

    I was on the scene of a NASTY automoblile accident once and there was a young lady that said "I am a nurse, can I help?" I told her I needed "vitals on that patient." I pointed to a non-critical patient and she went to the patient and started taking insurance/payment info!!!!!!!!!!:uhoh21: After we flew the two critical patients I asked her several pointed questions...long story short...she was a CNA. When cornered...She said "Well, I am ALMOST a nurse!!!!!" NOT EVEN CLOSE!!!!! So now, when a "medical professional" shows up on a scene, I ask for ID. "Burned once, shame on you. Burned twice, shame on ME!"

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    He is not a baby now, but, I served time in the Army with a Sergeant Hedd, Richard Hedd ...I mean...Come on...His parents must have HATED him!!

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    Thanks for letting me vent, I still am really upset over her death. At this point tonight I don't care if I ever see another code.[/QUOTE

    Wannabe3...The first code is ALWAYS the hardest. I am not going to say something stupid like "you have to suck it up and move on." That is not a good way to be. If you are having trouble, see your supervisor and ask about a CISM(Critical Incident Stress Management) debriefing. This is a VERY GOOD way to get help. I have been in E.M.S. for several years and have used it myself. It is HIGHLY recommended.
    My first code was a three year old who fell in the river in my home town. I knew him...His mother...father. I almost left E.M.S. HANG IN THERE Wannabe...you ARE!!!!!

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    Why does our society value the least the people it needs the most (nurses, teachers, policemen, firefighters, etc.)????

    I will never understand it.[/QUOTE]As a Paramedic, (manager btw) I will not make $25,000 this year. Usually the FIRST thing I hear when we get to a residence is "what the **** took you so long. Yes, we are under valued, ALL in the medical field are. But, most of us are in it for personal satisfaction also. When I see a former patient carrying out a normal life after an M.I., or, a child that was severely injured in an accident...THAT is (to me) what it is all about. $$$$$ is icing on the cake.:hatparty: Yes, I need money to pay my bills, feed the family and all that, but I feel that the medical field is a CALLING...not just a job.

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    Quote from Soon_2_B_LPN
    I have already wrote once But I figured this one would get through quicker! I am a student nurse seeking advice from anyone who is willing to give it to me! I just started my second quarter of school and I am having a hard time understanding med-surg and Pharm! I have my first test tomorrow and so unsure because I am not getting what I am studing! If there is anything I can do to to understand it better and anyone knows, please share it with me! I am so scared and I really want to get this stuff! PLEASE HELP ME!!!!!!!!!


    Soon...Something that helps me is word association...Use the med in a sentence, usually a goofy one that makes you chuckle. Confuses people, but it works. GOOD LUCK!!!!!!!!!!

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    Quote from ERslave
    When I interview, it generally takes about 45 minutes to an hour. Also...beware the "long silence"
    More questions - Was there ever a time when you believed co-workers were being inappropriate or doing something they shouldnt. And, how did you handle it.? How do you avoid "long silence"? Ive been a nurse a long time - some of these questions, I really had to think about.[/QUOTE]

    ERslave, when I think an answer may be "inappropriate" I will generally revisit the question later, lies are hard to keep up with, . If you are talking about actual co-workers that are current, I don't put up with it...AT ALL!(any more depth needed send me an E-mail and I promise to reply) As far as the "long silence" this is a deliberate "interviewer tactic" to get the interviewee to reveal more about themselves than they want.

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    nitenite, RHIA, RN, carolmaccas66, and 1 other like this.

    Quote from ERslave
    WOW!! Here in Memphis, the paramedics/emts are no longer allowed to refuse transport. Apparantly, several years ago, they had refused transport for a seemingly non-emergent patient...and he died. Now, they have to bring any and everybody that calls for an ambulance. We've seen pts call an ambulance because they ran out of refills. Basically, some people use it because they have no other means of transportation.
    ERslave...What I meant was, the PATIENT refuses...We have a form for them to sign, but, WE are not allowed to refuse services either. (WVa) Does have a protocol, I forget the number, that "allows" us to refuse, but leaves us open to lawsuites...(good ol' sharks, I mean lawers ). What we do now is...:roll load the patient in the "bus"...Start the IV and give the D-50 while enroute. That way (I know...that is cheating), we start care under "implied consent" and when they come around they are already loaded and on the way. BTW...We are a RURAL E.M.S. agency, our average transport time is 30-45 minutes.


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