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NurseOnAMotorcycle (13,588 Views)

Joined Jan 16, '11 - from 'Not Tellin, US'. She has '6' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Med-Surg 1, Emergency 5, CEN 2/2016'. Posts: 986 (62% Liked) Likes: 2,497

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  • 9:38 pm

    When I tell my charge that we have a symptomatic bleed she has to clear an acute bed for them. While that is happening, she can also move other puts to beds, such as a nonacute pt on the fast track side.

    i don't know if that's what was happening or if she was being a jerk to you, but either way I hope you didn't send the ot back out to the waiting room!

  • 12:33 am

    We have had active shooter situations in my ER. There was one case where a guy came with several guns and a bag of ammo to refill and continue shooting after his firearms were empty. As he came around the corner to our ER I was standing in front of the door coming to work when he looked me dead in the eye and turn towards me to shoot as four police officers tackled him to the ground. If a bystander had not called 911 about this guy walking up the sidewalk, I would've been dead.

    This triggered a major discussion as I went into work about what your instinctive response would be. The response that you do without thinking in a situation like that. To tell you the truth, I've had to speak to my family about my immediate reaction because it wasn't to run away or to attack, but to protect the families in the waiting room by throwing myself in the way.

    I console myself with the idea that we have a damn good trauma surgeon on my shift and I know he would put me back together

  • Feb 11

    I was laughing so hard I needed take a bathroom break halfway through this video !!!


  • Feb 10

    We have had active shooter situations in my ER. There was one case where a guy came with several guns and a bag of ammo to refill and continue shooting after his firearms were empty. As he came around the corner to our ER I was standing in front of the door coming to work when he looked me dead in the eye and turn towards me to shoot as four police officers tackled him to the ground. If a bystander had not called 911 about this guy walking up the sidewalk, I would've been dead.

    This triggered a major discussion as I went into work about what your instinctive response would be. The response that you do without thinking in a situation like that. To tell you the truth, I've had to speak to my family about my immediate reaction because it wasn't to run away or to attack, but to protect the families in the waiting room by throwing myself in the way.

    I console myself with the idea that we have a damn good trauma surgeon on my shift and I know he would put me back together

  • Feb 9

    We have had active shooter situations in my ER. There was one case where a guy came with several guns and a bag of ammo to refill and continue shooting after his firearms were empty. As he came around the corner to our ER I was standing in front of the door coming to work when he looked me dead in the eye and turn towards me to shoot as four police officers tackled him to the ground. If a bystander had not called 911 about this guy walking up the sidewalk, I would've been dead.

    This triggered a major discussion as I went into work about what your instinctive response would be. The response that you do without thinking in a situation like that. To tell you the truth, I've had to speak to my family about my immediate reaction because it wasn't to run away or to attack, but to protect the families in the waiting room by throwing myself in the way.

    I console myself with the idea that we have a damn good trauma surgeon on my shift and I know he would put me back together

  • Feb 9

    "I was here before you and I will be here after you are gone."

  • Feb 8

    We have had active shooter situations in my ER. There was one case where a guy came with several guns and a bag of ammo to refill and continue shooting after his firearms were empty. As he came around the corner to our ER I was standing in front of the door coming to work when he looked me dead in the eye and turn towards me to shoot as four police officers tackled him to the ground. If a bystander had not called 911 about this guy walking up the sidewalk, I would've been dead.

    This triggered a major discussion as I went into work about what your instinctive response would be. The response that you do without thinking in a situation like that. To tell you the truth, I've had to speak to my family about my immediate reaction because it wasn't to run away or to attack, but to protect the families in the waiting room by throwing myself in the way.

    I console myself with the idea that we have a damn good trauma surgeon on my shift and I know he would put me back together

  • Feb 8

    We have had active shooter situations in my ER. There was one case where a guy came with several guns and a bag of ammo to refill and continue shooting after his firearms were empty. As he came around the corner to our ER I was standing in front of the door coming to work when he looked me dead in the eye and turn towards me to shoot as four police officers tackled him to the ground. If a bystander had not called 911 about this guy walking up the sidewalk, I would've been dead.

    This triggered a major discussion as I went into work about what your instinctive response would be. The response that you do without thinking in a situation like that. To tell you the truth, I've had to speak to my family about my immediate reaction because it wasn't to run away or to attack, but to protect the families in the waiting room by throwing myself in the way.

    I console myself with the idea that we have a damn good trauma surgeon on my shift and I know he would put me back together

  • Feb 8

    We have had active shooter situations in my ER. There was one case where a guy came with several guns and a bag of ammo to refill and continue shooting after his firearms were empty. As he came around the corner to our ER I was standing in front of the door coming to work when he looked me dead in the eye and turn towards me to shoot as four police officers tackled him to the ground. If a bystander had not called 911 about this guy walking up the sidewalk, I would've been dead.

    This triggered a major discussion as I went into work about what your instinctive response would be. The response that you do without thinking in a situation like that. To tell you the truth, I've had to speak to my family about my immediate reaction because it wasn't to run away or to attack, but to protect the families in the waiting room by throwing myself in the way.

    I console myself with the idea that we have a damn good trauma surgeon on my shift and I know he would put me back together

  • Feb 8

    We have had active shooter situations in my ER. There was one case where a guy came with several guns and a bag of ammo to refill and continue shooting after his firearms were empty. As he came around the corner to our ER I was standing in front of the door coming to work when he looked me dead in the eye and turn towards me to shoot as four police officers tackled him to the ground. If a bystander had not called 911 about this guy walking up the sidewalk, I would've been dead.

    This triggered a major discussion as I went into work about what your instinctive response would be. The response that you do without thinking in a situation like that. To tell you the truth, I've had to speak to my family about my immediate reaction because it wasn't to run away or to attack, but to protect the families in the waiting room by throwing myself in the way.

    I console myself with the idea that we have a damn good trauma surgeon on my shift and I know he would put me back together

  • Feb 8

    We have had active shooter situations in my ER. There was one case where a guy came with several guns and a bag of ammo to refill and continue shooting after his firearms were empty. As he came around the corner to our ER I was standing in front of the door coming to work when he looked me dead in the eye and turn towards me to shoot as four police officers tackled him to the ground. If a bystander had not called 911 about this guy walking up the sidewalk, I would've been dead.

    This triggered a major discussion as I went into work about what your instinctive response would be. The response that you do without thinking in a situation like that. To tell you the truth, I've had to speak to my family about my immediate reaction because it wasn't to run away or to attack, but to protect the families in the waiting room by throwing myself in the way.

    I console myself with the idea that we have a damn good trauma surgeon on my shift and I know he would put me back together

  • Feb 8

    You have been working towards being here in the ED for how long? At least 3 years? (I peeked at some of your previous posts.). Now you are here. That says something in itself. You've already shown that you have goals and aren't afraid to work towards them.

    You are just past your first year in the ED and things are only just finally starting to make sense to you in less of a task oriented way and more of a critical thinking way. Now your skill level is starting to look more outward and is noticing a whole new level of goals (perceived as "not good enough's").

    Every time you "level up" you take a major hit to your confidence and self esteem. So in a way you should feel really good about feeling like you can't do anything right. If you can get past it and through it, you will start to realize all of the skills and early signals that you catch now that you couldn't before.

    I also hate it when it feels like everyone is talking about me. It hurts my feelings and I start looking at transferring or changing shift. I am not a tough personality. I take everything very personally and too much to heart. But, thank God, I have learned that things move much too quickly at work for people to talk about any one thing for too long, and it will pass. All I have to do is wait it out. You can too.

  • Feb 7

    Apologies as I only skimmed the previous replies.

    As an ER nurse, I'll tell you that we always grumble about transfers. That doesn't mean you shouldn't follow up on your instincts. If you are that worried, then send them!

  • Feb 7

    You have been working towards being here in the ED for how long? At least 3 years? (I peeked at some of your previous posts.). Now you are here. That says something in itself. You've already shown that you have goals and aren't afraid to work towards them.

    You are just past your first year in the ED and things are only just finally starting to make sense to you in less of a task oriented way and more of a critical thinking way. Now your skill level is starting to look more outward and is noticing a whole new level of goals (perceived as "not good enough's").

    Every time you "level up" you take a major hit to your confidence and self esteem. So in a way you should feel really good about feeling like you can't do anything right. If you can get past it and through it, you will start to realize all of the skills and early signals that you catch now that you couldn't before.

    I also hate it when it feels like everyone is talking about me. It hurts my feelings and I start looking at transferring or changing shift. I am not a tough personality. I take everything very personally and too much to heart. But, thank God, I have learned that things move much too quickly at work for people to talk about any one thing for too long, and it will pass. All I have to do is wait it out. You can too.

  • Feb 7

    So picture this happening...
    http://allnurses.com/emergency-nursi...d-1029107.html

    ...and then being called from the floor about a field site IV.


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