Latest Likes For NurseOnAMotorcycle

NurseOnAMotorcycle 23,108 Views

Joined: Jan 16, '11; Posts: 1,115 (63% Liked) ; Likes: 3,065
from US
Specialty: 6 year(s) of experience in Med-Surg 1, Emergency 5, CEN 2/2016

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • Apr 20

    A FLACC scale on a verbal pt...

    seeking!

  • Apr 17

    I wear my wedding band and my watch. You'll have a hard time prying either of them from me. My watch is 1/2 up my forearm, well out of the way for a good scrubbing. My ring is just loose enough that I am able to move it the 1/4" to wash under it.

    I like the idea of a fob watch but I have so many things around my neck now that I feel like I'm having back problems (New About A Nurse comic anyone?). Stethoscope, oximeter cable, vocera, OSA pager, hillrom location fob, badge, etc....

  • Jan 8

    It's true, looking cute gets you more. There have been a ton of studies on it. I think that OP's frustration is valid.

  • Dec 8 '17

    Quote from BeenThere2012
    Anyone interested in a "pet peeve regarding doctors" thread?
    While I do have pet peeves, it is usually from a particular person rather than providers (MD, PA, NP) in general.

    I would rather see a thread on doctors who have gone above and beyond. That way instead of encouraging divisiveness between doctors and nurses, we would be encouraging professional respect.

    Edited to add: ps. If you look at the md version of allnurses, there are hugely more providers standing up for us than bashing us, and the rude ones are almost always students or otherwise insecure about themselves.

  • Nov 23 '17

    Ditto machines that printed only in blue.

    Sitting in the 3rd row of the station wagon- facing backwards
    Attachment 17465

    Cigarette vending machines

    Standing up in the front seat while mom was driving

    Cooking on the stove at 5 years old

    Walking several miles to the store alone at 7 years old

    Shiny metallic Christmas ornaments hanging everywhere
    Attachment 17464

  • Nov 13 '17

    Ok I have a few things to suggest. First, the ED (as others have already stated) is a teamwork place. Never be be afraid to ask the nicer experienced nurses for help. They want you to do well because, as previous posters have stated, new hires are extra hands and that is always good.

    Second, we've mentioned the other nurses, but the techs are also usually experienced paramedics. Tell them how you feel and they will usually go out of their way to help you. They will keep their eyes open for you on your less acute patients and let you know if they need something. If you have CNAs count yourself lucky because hopefully they will be like ours and patients will have VS done and help to the bathroom, giving you more time to keep the critical ones stable.

    Last, keep some post its in your pocket and make lists of what you need to do/monitor. It will go a long way to keeping your head straight, more organized, and less panicked.

    Going into any new specialty is a gawd awful experience at first. It's very normal to be overwhelmed, especially when you are sort of thrown in like that. But there is help and it really does get better. If not, then there are other options still open too.

  • Nov 13 '17
  • Nov 13 '17

    Why? It's cruel and unhealthy. It causes skin breakdown, pressure ulcers, promotes UTI, yeast growth, staph infections, abrasions in the groin where the edges are rubbing against the skin. It encourages laziness among caregivers which increases the likelihood of the aforementioned complications.

    I hope your coworkers do not do this! I never even attach briefs unless they are being transported out. I just leave them open under the patient. It's not illegal, it's Basic Nursing Care.


    skin breakdown briefs diapers - Google Search

  • Nov 10 '17

    Quote from CuriousCNA
    So using a pad or liner for heavy wetters is ok then, as long as it's checked regularly and not left in all night. I mean I assume that all of those issues in the first two comments can still occurs in single briefs too if they aren't checked enough. So those aren't good defense topics for double briefing. I understand that it's not nice or morally right to leave a resident wet for too long, if you can change them and aren't busy then yes of course. But for the sake of bed strips and saving a roll on a stiff patient or some that are in the fetal position, a liner or pad inside the brief is acceptable. Cause there's nothing legally saying no it's unacceptable. It's not neglect or abuse (when changed appropriately)
    Oh Heaven help those patients. I can't even count the number of things wrong with this whole statement. If you are doing this, please stop. Turn q2 hours, leave total care patients' briefs open to air. You are in the healthcare business, not the "trying to get out of doing anything" business.

    If you feel that it's ok to NOT move a stiff patient or to leave them in a brief until "if you can change them if you aren't too busy" because you feel that "it's not illegal" then PLEASE quit your job immediately!!!

  • Nov 10 '17

    Why? It's cruel and unhealthy. It causes skin breakdown, pressure ulcers, promotes UTI, yeast growth, staph infections, abrasions in the groin where the edges are rubbing against the skin. It encourages laziness among caregivers which increases the likelihood of the aforementioned complications.

    I hope your coworkers do not do this! I never even attach briefs unless they are being transported out. I just leave them open under the patient. It's not illegal, it's Basic Nursing Care.


    skin breakdown briefs diapers - Google Search

  • Nov 9 '17

    Why? It's cruel and unhealthy. It causes skin breakdown, pressure ulcers, promotes UTI, yeast growth, staph infections, abrasions in the groin where the edges are rubbing against the skin. It encourages laziness among caregivers which increases the likelihood of the aforementioned complications.

    I hope your coworkers do not do this! I never even attach briefs unless they are being transported out. I just leave them open under the patient. It's not illegal, it's Basic Nursing Care.


    skin breakdown briefs diapers - Google Search

  • Oct 23 '17

    "Only an associates degree"...?!

  • Oct 22 '17

    I'm another one who has recently had an orientee like that. I ended up speaking to the nurse manager and having them orient with another preceptor as an objective third party/second opinion. They shared my concerns and that person is no longer in our department.

    please do keep us updated! And good luck!

  • Oct 21 '17

    I'm another one who has recently had an orientee like that. I ended up speaking to the nurse manager and having them orient with another preceptor as an objective third party/second opinion. They shared my concerns and that person is no longer in our department.

    please do keep us updated! And good luck!

  • Aug 30 '17

    This is just a post related to the absolute gazillions of negative commentary about night shift.

    1. Teamwork, less backstabbing and sarcasm
    2. Shift differential
    3. Meals and showers are generally already done
    4. The 3am giggles
    5. Never need a sitter (elementary kids + older)
    6. The traffic is nonexistent
    7. Superheroes work at night (Batman, Green Arrow, Daredevil, Dark Angel)
    8. Putting small gifts at pt bedsides Christmas Eve/Halloween for those who celebrate and then get to go home and spend morning with family
    9. Sleeping out in a hammock (under a shady tree!) to get Vitamin D
    10. Sending family to work/school and having house to myself
    11. Night shift is full of really crazy or crazy sick pts. Either way, it's a good time.

    ...

    You can disagree with me or do your night shifts/sleeping differently, and that's great. I love night shift. I'm hooked.


close