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Joined Jan 16, '11 - from 'NY'. She has '6' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Med-Surg 1, Emergency 5, CEN 2/2016'. Posts: 1,117 (63% Liked) Likes: 3,047

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  • Mar 19

    This is just a post related to the absolute gazillions of negative commentary about night shift.

    1. Teamwork, less backstabbing and sarcasm
    2. Shift differential
    3. Meals and showers are generally already done.
    4. The 3am giggles
    5. Never need a sitter (elementary kids + older)
    6. The traffic is nonexistent
    7. Superheroes work at night (Batman, Green Arrow, Daredevil, Dark Angel)
    8. Putting small gifts at pt bedsides Christmas Eve/Halloween for those who celebrate and then get to go home and spend morning with family
    9. Sleeping out in a hammock (under a shady tree!) to get Vitamin D
    10. Sending family to work/school and having house to myself.
    11. Night shift is full of really crazy or crazy sick pts. Either way, it's a good time.

    ...

    You can disagree with me or do your night shifts/sleeping differently, and that's great. I love night shift. I'm hooked.

  • Mar 19

    This is just a post related to the absolute gazillions of negative commentary about night shift.

    1. Teamwork, less backstabbing and sarcasm
    2. Shift differential
    3. Meals and showers are generally already done.
    4. The 3am giggles
    5. Never need a sitter (elementary kids + older)
    6. The traffic is nonexistent
    7. Superheroes work at night (Batman, Green Arrow, Daredevil, Dark Angel)
    8. Putting small gifts at pt bedsides Christmas Eve/Halloween for those who celebrate and then get to go home and spend morning with family
    9. Sleeping out in a hammock (under a shady tree!) to get Vitamin D
    10. Sending family to work/school and having house to myself.
    11. Night shift is full of really crazy or crazy sick pts. Either way, it's a good time.

    ...

    You can disagree with me or do your night shifts/sleeping differently, and that's great. I love night shift. I'm hooked.

  • Feb 18

    Ok I have a few things to suggest. First, the ED (as others have already stated) is a teamwork place. Never be be afraid to ask the nicer experienced nurses for help. They want you to do well because, as previous posters have stated, new hires are extra hands and that is always good.

    Second, we've mentioned the other nurses, but the techs are also usually experienced paramedics. Tell them how you feel and they will usually go out of their way to help you. They will keep their eyes open for you on your less acute patients and let you know if they need something. If you have CNAs count yourself lucky because hopefully they will be like ours and patients will have VS done and help to the bathroom, giving you more time to keep the critical ones stable.

    Last, keep some post its in your pocket and make lists of what you need to do/monitor. It will go a long way to keeping your head straight, more organized, and less panicked.

    Going into any new specialty is a gawd awful experience at first. It's very normal to be overwhelmed, especially when you are sort of thrown in like that. But there is help and it really does get better. If not, then there are other options still open too.

  • Jan 23

    Quote from GrumpyRN
    I'm going to, gently, stir this a bit.

    Orientate, orientated, orientation and orientating are the correct pronunciations/spellings, you yanks decided to corrupt them and ended up with words like orient and oriented. This sound too similar to oriental. Remember, it is called English for a reason.
    Well learn something new... I've only ever heard that word in the last couple of years in the ER, but on with the topic of mispronunciations.

    As I overheard an irate pt saying... "Don't you conversate me! You don't know nuthin 'bout me! My gentles been hurtin' all day and I'm not going to stand here while you guys just ignore my burnin' gentles!"

  • Jan 23

    Two words that drive me crazy are "Conversate" instead of converse, speak, or talk) and "Orientate" instead of orienting or orientation.

  • Jan 22

    Quote from GrumpyRN
    I'm going to, gently, stir this a bit.

    Orientate, orientated, orientation and orientating are the correct pronunciations/spellings, you yanks decided to corrupt them and ended up with words like orient and oriented. This sound too similar to oriental. Remember, it is called English for a reason.
    Well learn something new... I've only ever heard that word in the last couple of years in the ER, but on with the topic of mispronunciations.

    As I overheard an irate pt saying... "Don't you conversate me! You don't know nuthin 'bout me! My gentles been hurtin' all day and I'm not going to stand here while you guys just ignore my burnin' gentles!"

  • Jan 19

    Being off of orientation does not mean that you were not allowed to ask for help. Get your LPNs and HCT's involved. Let them know that you are new and sometimes need help catching up. The good ones will help you. Hang in there, find another RN who you can talk to for help if you are getting bogged down. Like any new job, time management will come as you get more settled in.

  • Jan 17

    Why are teachers still telling students how scary doctors are?! The first thing I usually have to do with students is intro the docs and show the new grads how un-scary they are. Poor things are afraid to ask for zofran for their vomiting pts.

  • Dec 29 '16

    Instead of judging and making each other feel less, why don't we lift each other up and educate and encourage?

    How to decompress after a traumatic experience.
    Finding the impossible to find vein.
    Handling escalating situations/ de-escalating techniques.
    How to talk to other caregivers when they snap at you.
    How to talk to patients who have just been told devastating diagnoses.
    Understanding type A personalities/understanding introverts.
    Orientation and what to expect.
    A day in the life of X specialty, understanding the other specialties.
    NCLEX.
    What to expect if you make a med error/if a patient falls/IV line infiltrates?

    Why does it have to be "are you too fat to be a nurse"

  • Dec 24 '16

    It'll come. It comes with experience and sooner than you realize, you'll be one of the nurses grabbing and hanging critical care medications. It takes a while to get to that point, at least a year, and then sometimes two more before you feel so smooth that you are helping the new ones with their patients.

    The problem is that we live in an instant gratification world and this level of care doesn't come the second you get hired. You can do this. Be patient and when a doctor says "start an epi drip" you can say "getting it!" and then do it with some guidance.

  • Dec 23 '16

    What was said by everyone:
    You are unhappy. Let's help you feel better!

    What was said by Callie:
    Stay crying and vomiting like me.

  • Dec 17 '16

    Another dose of body shaming.

  • Dec 15 '16

    But why does it have to be "Too fat or not"?

    It it feels like we went straight to Cosmo instead of Scientific American.

    Whats next? "12 ways to please your doctor?"

  • Dec 15 '16

    Instead of judging and making each other feel less, why don't we lift each other up and educate and encourage?

    How to decompress after a traumatic experience.
    Finding the impossible to find vein.
    Handling escalating situations/ de-escalating techniques.
    How to talk to other caregivers when they snap at you.
    How to talk to patients who have just been told devastating diagnoses.
    Understanding type A personalities/understanding introverts.
    Orientation and what to expect.
    A day in the life of X specialty, understanding the other specialties.
    NCLEX.
    What to expect if you make a med error/if a patient falls/IV line infiltrates?

    Why does it have to be "are you too fat to be a nurse"

  • Dec 14 '16

    Another dose of body shaming.


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