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J-Swish 3,539 Views

Joined Jan 15, '11. Posts: 81 (23% Liked) Likes: 45

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  • Sep 18 '15

    I see a lot of people are Dave Ramsey followers. The biggest problem I have with him is the loss of huge amounts of money because of him not liking credit cards. Credit card rewards these days are pretty freaking awesome and worth hundreds or even thousands of dollars a year, which is free money Dave Ramsey followers are throwing into the toilet.

    I just stayed in a hotel for free a couple weeks back that would have cost me $180 if I had paid for it (I checked the room rate that night and that's what that particular upgraded room would have come to with taxes) and I have gotten at least $100 of free stuff of of Amazon this year. Plus $190 in rewards points I have sitting in Chase's Ultimate Rewards program right now that I haven't redeemed yet. Not to mention the sign-up bonus for my Hyatt card I haven't redeemed yet - 2 nights in any Hyatt anywhere in the world, and some of them can run up to $800 or so a night, so those nights alone could be worth $1600 depending on where I redeem them. I may use them to go to NTI in New Orleans next year if my hospital doesn't pay for it.

    So, basically, this year I have earned up to $2000 in credit card rewards and the year isn't even over yet. I don't know how anyone can pass that much free money up. This is not chump change we are talking about. All you have to do is pay off your cards in full every month so you never pay any interest, and you can really take these credit card companies for a ride and save a ton of money.

  • Sep 18 '15

    Quote from joanna73
    I will probably eventually retire in Thailand. You need around 60,000 US in savings, plus regular monthly income (pension, savings or combination). I detest winter and my money will go much farther.
    Thai food is delish. Just sayin'.

  • Sep 18 '15

    I will probably eventually retire in Thailand. You need around 60,000 US in savings, plus regular monthly income (pension, savings or combination). I detest winter and my money will go much farther.

  • Sep 18 '15

    Quote from Emergent
    Our culture seems to have lost the ability to delay gratification. It's a big change from my parents, who grew up in the depression and scrimped and counted every penny.
    I was lucky to have such wonderful parents. As a student who had to watch my friends with all these cool gadgets while I was stuck with my CD player, I used to feel like the odd one out. And we would never go out to eat. I think we went out for dinner maybe 2 times in 10 yrs. My parents also grew up in poverty.

    In retrospect, I appreciate the values that they taught me. I paid for my own apartment and expenses while in college. I'm paying off my nursing degree as well. And I know how to manage my expenses. You value money a lot more when you're the one earning it.

  • Sep 18 '15

    I agree, not a hat person. I'm a careful person about money, but I do have my indulgences. I enjoy snowboarding, good beer, etc.

    My point is, a lot of people let money slip through their fingers. And the cultural norm has become a spendthrift lifestyle, using plastic, living lavish lifestyles beyond our means.

    I see our $10 an hour CNAs loading up on expensive coffee bar drinks. $70 a month in coffee bar expenses is equal to an 8 hr day in wages for them. Heck, I see high school students do the same.

    Our culture seems to have lost the ability to delay gratification. It's a big change from my parents, who grew up in the depression and scrimped and counted every penny.

  • Sep 17 '15

    Quote from 2k15NurseExtern4u
    I see alot of comments about home ownership and such. I don't know why, but I have been feeling like home-ownership may not be for me. I don't think I like the idea of being responsible for repairs/maintenance or being tied down to one place for a long period of time.
    I didn't buy my fist home (condo) until I was in my mid-40's -- and while it will probably turn out OK for me financially, I wouldn't do it again. It was something I felt I should do for financial reasons, but I really hate the burdens of ownership and maintenance. That's why I bought a condo -- some, but not all, of the maintenance is taken care of by the association. I also hate the feeling of being tied down. If something happened to my job, it would be a lot harder to move to a different city for a good job offer.

    Financially, I could have done as well by simply investing the extra cost of ownership into a moderate-risk, well-diversified, portfolio. If you have the discipline to give yourself the "extra savings" (in addition to the normal retirement savings), you could probably end up with the same amount of money that I will get when I finally sell my condo when I retire. At that time, I will be moving into a retirement community that is rental, not ownership.

  • Sep 17 '15

    Home ownership is not always a good idea. Sometimes planned savings along with investing will prove to be the wiser choice. All potential homeowners should carefully weigh the options of renting versus owning.

  • Sep 17 '15

    Quote from mc3
    I have a question for those who have gotten rid of their cable company. You still need the internet to get to Netflix, etc. right? so you have still have to pay something for the line. If you use your computer to view shows, etc. how do you know what's on and when? Can you still watch the news? If so, how? I do have Apple TV, and I've seen shows there. I'm really hoping to give up the hated cable company thieves, but not sure how to go about doing it. I admit we are not computer savvy at all, although manage to get around.

    Love this thread! It's giving me inspiration to try and cut back and live "simply", although we are hardly spenders to begin with.
    Thanks
    I don't really "watch the news" except on break at work where FOX is on the nearby tv.

    I have subscriptions to the things that I prefer to read online, like my local and regional newspapers and a couple of national/international outlets.

    I peruse things like the AP and Reuters, the BBC, and Al Jazeera.
    I read links that other people provide, especially if it is from a source that I have never read.

    I interact with friends and family on Facebook with my "smartphone" and get ideas for programming that I might enjoy. Then I download it using one of the various venues available for that sort of thing. I still have to pay the internet provider for that ability and it still seems to be too expensive but I live in AK where everything is expensive.

    I do use Netflix. I watch a couple of ongoing programs on that site. House of Cards, for instance (although I am far behind and will watch the entire last season during the dark of winter).

    It helps that I am not addicted to professional sporting events or teams.

    In my view, reducing the cable television influence in our lives is a positive thing in most cases.

  • Sep 17 '15

    Quote from toomuchbaloney
    I don't really "watch the news" except on break at work where FOX is on the nearby tv.
    I didn't know FOX was considered news.

    The news is so depressing these days. I could just do fine living ignorantly without TV and watch Netflix on my computer. That would save a few hundred dollars. Say... Anyone looking to buy a TV?

  • Sep 17 '15

    Ignorance is bliss. The news is depressing and there's so many useless shows on cable. I can easily do without it.

  • Sep 17 '15

    Quote from J-Swish
    I'm not sure how receptive this would be, but I'm a huge advocate for retiring abroad where your money will go further. Places like Thailand, certain parts of Europe, Mexico, Belize, etc. Many Americans do that. I convinced several older colleagues to do that as well and it's working very well for them. Ofc it's not for everyone though and requires you to have stashed away when you were younger. That, or you won the lottery.
    My husband and I are visiting belize at the end of this year we fully intend to retire there two thumbs up.

  • Jun 1 '14

    Another multistage agency:
    http://www.psahealthcare.com/our_services.html

    I would contact a few to see which office best suits your needs. I've worked pediatric PDN for 3 years now. I work with two agencies, one full time and one per diem. I interviewed at two others. The two other offices were disorganized with grandiose promises (working on reputation of other offices). The two agencies I work with each have their pluses and minuses. And both are aware that I work for 2 agencies, I just can't work for the same client for both agencies (some medically complex kids with nursing 16h/day x 7d/week split the shifts between two agencies to ensure full coverage).

    Two regional agencies are Loving Care Agency/Links 2 Care and Newborn Nurses that you can look into.

  • Jun 1 '14

    Private duty in home care for 4-16 hours most often special needs pediatrics/young adult. Some agencies also contract RNs as substitute school nurses (valid RN license & CPR card) or accompany client to school or adult day program. (Need background check for dept of education)

    Here is one agency that is in many states and well respected. If you lived in my area, an experienced nurse with weekend availability you could be eligible for sign-on & retention bonuses

    http://www.bayada.com/services_pediatrics.asp

  • May 30 '14

    Look into home health... my old boss used to do assessments as needed for an agency

  • May 30 '14

    Private duty nurses also have considerable control over their schedules. At least, I do!


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