Latest Comments by rnccf2007

Latest Comments by rnccf2007

rnccf2007 2,752 Views

Joined Jan 10, '11. Posts: 153 (57% Liked) Likes: 271

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 2
    milesims and sallyrnrrt like this.

    I just completed a twelve hour shift (7a-7p)...well actually 0700 to 2145...almost 15 hours with no lunch and two five minute breaks. I slept for 10 hours afterward and woke up tired, sore, and depressed. Why is it okay for nurses (who hold lives in our hands) to be subjected to this? This is not a profession...it is glorified slavery. Personally, I would not want a doctor or nurse taking care of me who did not have a break or some food or water in a reasonable amount of time.

  • 0

    My thoughts exactly. Happened to me before, but back to the OP

  • 2
    imintrouble and Sisyphus like this.

    And should have known by posting this it would come off the wrong way.

  • 8
    kidsmom002, joanna73, DoeRN, and 5 others like this.

    I totally agree. But I am spending the majority of my time doing this. Meanwhile, back at the ranch, my patient was going into respiratory failure, while I was getting patients and their families coffee.

  • 4
    kidsmom002, Chew-POW, technofreak, and 1 other like this.

    Does anyone else want to leave bedside nursing, because they feel like a glorified nursing assistant? Don't get me wrong. I am not putting down nursing assistants, was one for 8 years, they are our "eyes and ears" just like we are for doctors, and they have helped me save lives on many occasions. The problem is...where are they at? Seems hospitals have cut them so short that nurses are doing their jobs too. In the last week...Could not get a companion for a patient with dementia and was basically told to chemically or physically restrain him, because there were not enough nursing assistants in a large metro hospital ...in fact none! (LOL, POLICY states that we use less restrictive measures before attempting this...POLICY basically states that we lie), spent a lot of time getting patients on and off the bedpan or BSC, getting coffee, spent 1 1/2 hours in a patient's room cleaning stool, etc. This is not below me. But think I may have missed some early changes in a patient who was eventually intubated and sent to the unit.

  • 0

    You took so many words out of my mouth!!! Thank you.

  • 1
    MusicNurseCarrlee likes this.

    I have nine years of nursing experience and have been an agency nurse for almost two years. The first thing that I recommend is to thoroughly check out the various nursing agencies in your area and find out what they have to offer such as benefits, pay scale, etc. For example, pay scale... At one hospital I worked at I talked to another nurse (doing the same job I was) working for a different agency and found out that she was making almost $5 less an hour than I was. She then quickly switched to my agency! Benefits...some offer medical benefits, some do not and this can depend if you work on a contract or prn. As far as extra money... consider no pto, no vacation pay, no short-term or long-term disability insurance, have to pay for your own BLS and ACLS classes, no tuition reimbursement, etc. So, in the end it may not be extra money. Flexibility in scheduling is another thing to consider. Remember, you will usually work at facilities to provide gaps in regular staffing. I have talked to and worked with nurses who have been agency nurses for many years. At one time, (at least in my area---Akron/Cleveland/Youngstown, OH) you could basically pick and choose when you wanted to work. Not always the case these days, although there is still some flexibility (but then again this is the same if you are an employee, because many facilities have self-scheduling).

    Also, r/t filling in the gaps. If doing prn, you will be the first nurse to be cancelled r/t census and staffing. When I first started doing agency, I worked for only one facility and was rarely cancelled. Then census went down, and I was sometimes going two weeks without working. So, I started working for multiple facilities through my agency. And being unsure if you are going to work that day sucks...getting that call that you are cancelled two hours before you start work. However, if you take a contract, you are basically guaranteed your hours, which I prefer.

    You wrote, "What is it really like walking into a floor you've never worked and expected to start work?" To be honest, the first time that I did it was scary. I was told to come in an hour early to learn the computer system and acclimate myself to the environment. Well, got there and couldn't get into the computer system...when they finally got me in two hours later, I had to take care of my patients and learn the computer system on my own. So, another thing to check out is what kind or orientation you will get at the facilities you will work in.

  • 0

    ????never asked about HCTZ, or Losartin, or Norvasc, or Tikosyn for that matter. What is your point?

  • 0

    figured---BYE and thanks for my thesis

  • 0

    Exactly who do you answer to then?

  • 0

    do any of you know how to play one on one. done with bullys 25 years ago

  • 0

    Anon? what is this you certainly don't intimidate me

  • 0

    Why would I have to do that? They are on the cite.

  • 0

    I am going to plead once more...Anonymous is some kind of Troll...what...not sure, please read all posts

  • 0

    Please, be very careful.


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