Latest Comments by rnccf2007

Latest Comments by rnccf2007

rnccf2007 2,954 Views

Joined Jan 10, '11. Posts: 180 (52% Liked) Likes: 283

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 0

    Tread very carefully. You can potentially damage a nurse's career and life. Have witnessed incidences where some nurses are afraid to give pain medications (morphine prn, for example) to dying patients, because they feel it will hasten their death...I then call the doctor and get a morphine drip. Nobody should die in pain, if it can be helped. Also, have had patients..."seekers" give me BS that when the last nurse gave me my pain meds they worked...are you not giving them to me...are you giving me less? I don't play that game and always CYA.

    I guess my point is to let management do their job. It takes a lot of investigation to identify a diverter. Been through this experience myself. A nurse was diverting drugs and setting up other nurses to take the fall. It took almost a year of investigation...including the DEA.

  • 0

    Excellent post. My first thought to OP was ere is one nurse who gives out WAY more pain medication then any other nurse. It has always seemed weird to me but tread very carefully, when you can potentially ruin someone's life. OP states that this

  • 0

    Good luck reading my signature!

  • 0

    And, before anyone accuses me of using "search people" websites for illicit gains...I investigated these kind of websites for a college paper,

  • 0

    I don't believe our last names should be displayed on our name badges. If a patient and/or family member wants to make a complaint or positive comment about me, and need my last name, this can be handled by management or legal services...that is their job. I live in Ohio. From my understanding, there is no law that says a healthcare worker's first and last name need to be displayed on the ID badge. Recently had an incident where I worked, where a patient was stalking a nurse on Facebook....never addressed by management with the patient...after all it is just about patient "rights." Because of this, some nurses have concealed their last name on their ID badges, myself included. Facebook and other social media aside, for a small fee, anyone can access people's information on-line by typing in the first and last name on "search people" sites. If you don't believe this...try it!!! Often times, these websites give phone numbers, past and present addresses, and most frightening...names and addresses of family members. For those who have the mentality that it hasn't happened to me...keep burying your head in the sand...because it CAN. If you don't care about yourself, think about your loved ones.

  • 1
    LinenP likes this.

    Wow. Sounds like my dream hospital.

  • 0

    LOL, should we call Bill Cosby "doctor" too?

  • 3

    Actually why I want to get out of bedside nursing. Seems that I spending more time dealing with patient issues and family dynamics. Don't mind it. But yesterday spent most of my time dealing with this and almost missed a critical lab result. Too much is being placed on the bedside nurse.

  • 0

    I think the difference is....that is all they are dealing with.

  • 1
    Sisyphus likes this.

    Amen! Could not have said it better.

  • 1
    Sisyphus likes this.

    Been doing this for almost nine years. Used to love bedside nursing and was certain that I would never leave...this is what I have always wanted to do. Now, however, I often wake up in the morning and want to cry when I have to go to work...because of many of the things you site in your post. Looking to get out of bedside nursing...kind of breaks my heart.

  • 0

    Don't come here for advise if you don't want to consider it. You have been given a lot of good advice and it seems that you choose to ignore it. Take that ridiculous loan out....you will regret it...and starting to think you deserve it. Also, thinking that you should choose a degree in a different field.

  • 0

    Worked as a nurse in acute care for 9+ years. Have never seen a difference in the number of patients either ADN or BSN takes on.

  • 0

    At my first nursing job, ADN, I was in orientation with another RN who had an accelerated BSN. She was given an extra 6 weeks of orientation, because she just couldn't get it. No disrespect to you or other accelerated BSNs.

  • 0

    I got my BSN five years after my ADN. To be honest, did not learn much in the BSN program. Got my BSN, because I saw this trend coming and was thinking I may want to be an NP. Yes, had to do research for the classes, but have done this since I became a nurse...because I understand that we need to stay current on health care issues.

    Hospitals are big business, they don't care about health care anymore. HELLO hospitals! It doesn't take a rocket scientist to understand that the short staffing is the major contributer of hospital mortality. What a smokescreen.


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