Latest Comments by havehope

Latest Comments by havehope

havehope, ADN, CNA, RN 7,786 Views

Joined Oct 29, '10 - from 'United States'. havehope is a Registered Nurse. Posts: 391 (27% Liked) Likes: 201

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  • 1
    lilypeña likes this.

    Congratulations!! I, too passed the NCLEX with low Kaplan scores. My scores usually were in the 50-57% range, with some being over 60 if I remember correctly. I knew for sure I was going to have 265 questions, but thank the Lord I only had 75 questions. Needless to say, I thought I failed. Again, Congratulations!!!

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    I agree with what the others said above. I am a new graduate working two months of nights and then coming back on days (I started as a CNA on days). If darn night shift didn't mess with my body/rhythm so much, I would stay on nights. My experience so far, is that you truly get time to spend with patients if they can't sleep, etc. I also would stay busy (updating report sheets, reading the patient's plans per the doctor), but it is not the dayshift busy, this made time go by too.

    For sleeping rhythms- say I work Monday, Tuesday, and Friday. On Sunday I stay up a little later than usual (I usually go to bed with the chickens), sleep in-probably till 9 or so. Then I will take a two hour nap around 1 or so. And of course on Monday, I slept all day.

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    I got maybe 10 SATA at the max and passed with 75 questions. I also didn't get any audio or ordered responses. Good luck! Just because you didn't get a lot of SATA doesn't mean you failed.

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    Hi Everyone,

    I've been looking for other threads before I posted about advice for new grads (I hope i'm posting in the right spot.) I couldn't find any, if I did they were very old. I will be starting next week as a new grad. Do you have any advice you would give? I'm up for anything! Luckily, the floor I have accepted a position is the same floor I have been working as a CNA and HUC on for 2 1/2 years (which can be good and bad at the same time.)

    Thank you in advance!

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    Have you heard anything?? Please say yes and that you passed. :-)

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    I created a thread of my NCLEX-RN experience. I passed with 75 questions (1/26). I posted the link so you could see my scores.

    http://allnurses.com/nclex-discussio...5-1033667.html

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    I would focus on finding out your learning style, like now. Reason I say this- when I got into Med Surg I, I was trying to figure out what worked best for me. This caused me to constantly struggle. If you get your learning style down pat it will help a whole lot! I did lots of concept maps, for some reason this helped me. I'm a visual learner. I found for learning diagnostic tests, I would youtube it. That was I big help. I could close my eyes and picture it.

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    Quote from sandiegotrish
    Well, because the outcome I decide on will change where I start. I am a planner. I don't want to go get an ADN and then find out I can't get a job with the ADN. But there is certainly room for me to choose to go ADN>BSN, so your advice is valid! You're absolutely right, I need to figure out whether nursing is right for me, and I suppose going ADN first is the most cost-effective way to do so. I guess what I'm the most worried about is making sure I have the BEST credentials I can to secure a job I love in the end.
    I went the ADN route. First, it only took two years to complete (which means being a broke college student for two years not four). My employer will pay for me to get my BSN. I graduated in December, we had a class of 20 I believe (all ADN) and everyone but two got jobs. One moved back home out of the state and one didn't know where she wanted to work at. The only thing I ran into without having a BSN, I had to agree to get my BSN within 4-6 years or something like that. I'll be honest, I kind of like this because it MAKES me go back to school to get the BSN. On the other hand, it sucks because where I work at you get no pay raise for obtaining your BSN.

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    I choose to do ADN for several reasons. My program took two years. This means that you're in school (and probably a broke college student) for only two years. I figured i'd start making more money than being broke and then go back to college. Plus, my hospital will pay for my BSN if I agree to stay with them 2 years.

  • 0

    Quote from JustBeachyNurse
    I'm sorry. Hurry up and wait is difficult. Were there any issues that may have triggered a hold/audit? Issues signing in, Palm scan, computer glitches, got excited when finished and stood up instead of raising your hand?
    This is the only reason I could see a hold up. Or if someone was suspected of cheating-it may not have been you (or anyone sitting around you), but just clearing everyone that tested that day? I'm sorry you are experiencing this.

    Also, I tried using that link JustBeachyNurse posted too. I searched on the website by my name and my name also was not found. However, I used my license number and my name popped up. So, don't loose hope! :-)

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    I loved Kaplan. The live Review was testing taking strategies. However, I got a Kaplan content review book with my course and if I was missing questions simply because I didn't know the content I went back to their content book. I only used Kaplan and I thought highly of it. I can't speak for any of the other review courses though.

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    I took a live Kaplan review course and scheduled my test two weeks (I did not work during this time and I had no children) from the end of the review. I didn't study until the review course. I took a readiness test and based that on what particular content I needed to review. So, I reviewed that content and continued taking questions every day. I took at a minimum of 75 questions a day. When you review questions, review why you got them wrong and right. I reviewed all of mine regardless if I got them right. Since you are studying 8 weeks, I would not study 6-8 hours a day. I would study maybe 2-3 hours. Because, after studying so much you will start to second guess yourself. Good luck!

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    Quote from cap2253
    Thank you Justbeachy! Unfortunately my state (Virginia) is one that does not participate in the quick results.
    Hi Cap2253, I am from Virginia also. I took my NCLEX on January 26th and got my results back on the 27th. I called the license number around 9-9:30 and mine was up. Apparently they only update that once a day (usually in the morning, they said 10:00). I also went to where I applied on the Virginia Board of Nursing. Login in and you can check there too. Mine said "No license". So, I figured I failed and went to apply for applcation again. So, when I did that it said "You already have a license of this type." It will also give you a link to click on (i'm assuming only if you pass? I'm not sure) and I was able to see my license number on that. On the 28th my name was on the Virginia license lookup page- this gets updated every morning around 5 am. I hope this helps and good luck!! Please let us know how you did!

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    Quote from JustBeachyNurse
    Right but unless you are an expert in educational pedagogy & Blooms Taxonomy you have no way of knowing the cognitive level of a question. All question types have higher/above and lower/below levels whether SATA, delegation , calculation multiple choice So while your statement is true from a technical standpoint it's near impossible for a standard nclex candidate to determine the cognitive level off a question.


    Anyone who fails gets a candidate performance report. Use that to create a targeted plan to focus on weak areas.
    I wanted to restate what you've stated because so many students (including myself until I researched it), just because you are getting SATA questions does NOT mean they are passing. So many students say if you get SATA, priority, delegation, you are passing. This is not true. As JustBeachyNurse said, it's pretty much impossible to tell if it is a passing or failing question.

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    This is interesting, because on our nursing care boards it is a spot that say's "blood sugar" and the CNAs write the time and the blood sugar down for the nurse. However, with our blood sugar machines it automatically pops up in the patients chart, so the nurse can see it here too.


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