Latest Comments by conscientiousnurse

Latest Comments by conscientiousnurse

conscientiousnurse, RN 3,123 Views

Joined Sep 5, '10. Posts: 107 (26% Liked) Likes: 43

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 0

    Deleted duplicate

  • 0

    Thanks, Rntr and MBARNBSN! Yes, I saw the online resources at Humana. Haven't talked to any social workers yet (probably none at our agency) but I saw Humana does have a central resource specialist that can be communicated with.

  • 0

    Thanks for asking! I'm not a home health nurse, but a field case manager working for an agency that is contracted for Humana. It's not workman's comp, and not working for Medicaid. (Most of it will be visiting in the field doing assesments, connecting people to resources, etc., but no hands-on nursing). Doesn't seem like there will be a lot of orientation.

  • 0

    I've recently gotten a job in field case management helping chronically ill patients who are with a certain insurance provider. My first position in this field; I don't even have home health case manager experience. Any words of advice, or resources to look up? Would it help to get some kind of nursing care plan book to help with making action plans?

  • 0

    It is extremely rare, I know, but I know a patient who got Guillain barre syndrome after the shot. If a vaccine is really necessary, I'll get it. But the flu shot? As a fairly healthy person with no family members with immunodeficiency syndromes, I'm not convinced on the benefit vs. potential risk. If my work required it, that would be another matter.

  • 0

    HealthyNurse, thanks for the vaccine ingredients calculator link! I looked at it, and actually at least 1 brand of single-dose flu vaccine (Novartis) has thimersol (mercury) in it. And a lot of them have formaldehyde. Flu vaccines for sure aren't going to prevent any strain of the flu that's not in that year's vaccine either. I'd rather just keep my immunity up, and stay home from work if I do get sick.

  • 2
    Rntr and RN In FL like this.

    If you're able to insert IVs so well, have you considered applying for Phlebotomist positions? Seems like a job that doesn't require heavy lifting or a lot of the things nurses hate about their jobs. Also, some insurance companies hire people to go to homes to do phlebotomy and simple exams to check eligibility for life insurance.

  • 5

    I did PD in the past. You could look up more info on ventilator care (alarms, etc.), and videos on any other skills your clients have that you're not that comfortable with. Maybe review basics on peds, like vital signs, normal development. Also, a peds textbook should tell you the physiological differences between kids and adults. For instance, sometimes young kids don't have as much reserve and can go downhill faster. As far as being a specialty you can do till retirement, just keep your eyes wide open on the following.: Many of your clients will be total care, and will be growing heavier with time. You will be the one turning and transferring them. Sure, they might get a Hoyer lift at some point, but some clients can still be wearing on your back. Even night shift often has to turn during the night, and/or transfer client to or from bed. Also, it can sometimes be difficult to have a stable amount of work. If clients go to the hospital or move out of your area, you won't get to work for that client while they're not at home, and it can take time to find you another one. The families also can sometimes be difficult, but it sounds like you know how to handle that. If it weren't for those problems, a lot more nurses would enjoy this field as a "till retirement" job. But just in case your back can't handle it with time, I'd try to keep my skills up for another area of nursing for the future.

  • 0

    Yes, I took that course, although it was after I finished my school nursing job. It was a 2 day course, and I didn't have to study beforehand. I think it would be helpful for school nurses, and it's invaluable to have the teachers in the course available for questions (about what are signs that something is emergent; what's the difference between anaphylaxis and a milder allergic reaction, etc.)

  • 3

    Here's my point of view.: One of the basic things in man is the fight to stay alive. Unless the person has a terminal illness (or is very elderly with general poor health) and has now accepted the fact they will soon die, someone not having a desire to stay alive gives me a big red flag. In this situation, we assume they are not in their usual state of mind, and not in the position to make this kind of decision at the moment." A permanent solution to a temporary problem" is right. I believe life is something worth fighting for, whether in myself or in others. I believe that natural death has a lot of dignity to it. This culture being centered on the value of life, I believe is a good aspect of our culture, which is slowly being lost. I shiver to think what will happen if we lose this value altogether.

  • 0

    I'm about to apply for a public health nurse position, doing prenatal and postnatal visits, and being cross-trained in communicable disease/STDs/TB/immunizations. Sounds like a type of nursing I'd like. But I'm concerned that with so many governmental budget cutbacks, even if I get this job my public health career could be cut short by layoffs. I wonder if these skills are transferrable enough to make a PHN employable in other specialties? I don't have acute care skills as it is. What do you think?

  • 0

    FYI: This sounds like private-duty home care, so you may get more supplies in that section rather than this "home Health" section which is for intermittent visits. What to expect? You will most likely do CNA duties along with LPN duties (repositioning ct/ transferring to chair, bathing). In the PD agency I worked at before, we also did a little bit of housekeeping, like dusting and vacuuming and washing the client's own supplies, sometimes even the patient's laundry. The reasoning is that the client needs a healthy and clean environment. They did not have an aide available to be paid for, and the family already was responsible for the client usually for about 8 hrs/day (which might be the night shift). They figured we had time to maintain the client's immediate environment (and perhaps laundry) along with our other duties. Now, we never did things like windows, cleaning bathrooms, mopping floors, or cleaning kitchens.

  • 0

    I don't know about the pay scale for sure, but it's probably higher in Seattle than Vancouver. You could try googling nurse salary and location; they might have that on Indeed. The most important, though, is not the salary, but whether you'll be able to get a job at all, in a reasonable amount of time. In the Olympia area, jobs are hard to land. Pierce county also is listed on the "balanced" list rather than the "in demand" list for R.N.s. I think King County and Clark county are both on the in demand list, though.

  • 1
    llg likes this.

    In our area, home health and hospice agencies seem to be really looking for people with Med/Surg background (although not sure if they want ADN). And have you ever thought of dialysis? There's also flu clinics around now, which might be a good temporary job while you're seeking something else.

  • 0

    Oops, I just saw your latest post, so most of the post I just made is irrelevant. The job you interviewed for sounds like the insurance company wants you to do an assessment by asking the patient and/or family member questions. They may be assessing patient's functional abilities and cognitive abilities, for instance. Well, it is a job, and could be a way to get into another job working at an insurance company as a case manager, for instance. And you may be using critical thinking skills to figure out what type of help the person would need in their home.


close
close