Latest Comments by manusko

Latest Comments by manusko

manusko 6,372 Views

Joined Aug 29, '10. Posts: 606 (30% Liked) Likes: 322

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  • 2
    buspar and PMFB-RN like this.

    Question I was asked by each panel. What are your typical patients?

    I have heard that there are high acuity PACUs out there but they cannot compare to a high acuity ICU. PACU is generally getting stable patients and the ones that need more attention will generally go straight to ICU. Pacu may hold until a room opens. You may be happy that a couple of programs will take you but why limit your pool of schools?

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    You can easily find a ranking list on the Internet. These rankings can be viewed in different ways due to their criteria. I can tell you that most people I've spoke with would agree with these schools being higher teir schools. Last time I looked there were not any Florida schools near the top. I've heard that Florida schools treat you as a work horse and could care less if you actually learn something. This is just my opinion and discussions I've had with people.

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    What would you like to know?

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    Quote from icu2crna
    Does the ranking of the school matters when you apply for jobs?
    You will get a job no matter where you went to school. Many places could care less where your degree is from in my experience. Now if you are applying to a CRNA independent practice position there may be an issue with your independent practice in school and ability to perform blocks.

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    Quote from clbrown84
    I've been placed on the wait list at OU for their BSN program. Is there anyone who was placed on the wait list in 2013 selected??? I'm just curious what the odds of getting selected from the wait list are. I feel like I'm in limbo. Also, does anyone know of anything that would help me to get selected from the waitlist?
    Which campus?

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    Quote from surfnurse311
    looking into applying to multiple CRNA schools. what is the overall differences between Masters of anesthesia vs masters of nurse anethesia. obviously one is based on science and other is nursing focused. but what i am looking for is what are the differences post education? both degrees result in you as a CRNA? is there any limits as to why i should avoid a MS degree opposed to the MSN
    I have a MSN with a certificate in anesthesia. Makes no difference to the boards or who hires you from what I have seen and experienced.

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    Quote from RNdynamic
    Brief backstory: I am a registered nurse. I graduated in 2011 and found my first job in a hospital that same year working on a floor. I worked 80 hours every 2 weeks, which consisted of six 12 hour shifts and one eight hour shift. The hospital had high turnover and was in an economically depressed area in upstate NY. I worked at that hospital for about seven months before moving on and moving to a different state. Generally I worked my six twelve hour shifts in succession so that I could have a long stretch of days off. For example, I would work my six twelve hour shifts in a row then get like 8 days off. However, even though I would sometimes 60 to 72 hours in one week, I was never paid overtime. My coworkers explained that because the two weeks were averaged into a single pay period and that because I didn't go over 80 hours, I wouldn't receive overtime. I didn't know much about labor and how that all works so I just accepted that as true. Now its 2014 and when I tell people about how I was paid, they all tell me that what my employer was doing was illegal. Is that true? How far back would I even be allowed to take action for this?
    Yes. I am salary but get OT over 80hrs after 2 weeks. Some weeks I will work 50 hrs followed by a 20-30 hr week. I have hit OT but not often after a heavy week.

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    Quote from imadoll1980
    Hi. My name is Krissy and I'm a RN going to school at Lakeland for health care management. For my final paper I need to interview any manager in health care. The more the better. I'm not sure if it would be easy to answer this all back on here or an email would be preferred. I can post all the questions here and you could e-mail me back at Imadoll1980@aol.com. When you e-mail please include your first name only, city where you live, and place of employment or type of facility. Thank you so much 1. What are the biggest barriers at your job? 2. How did you overcome these barriers? Are there some barriers you cannot overcome? 3. Why did you choose this job? 4. What do you like about your job? 5. What do you dislike about your job? 6. What do you like the best about your boss? 7. How do you motivate your employees, coworkers, and or patients? 8. What are your goals at work and how do you achieve them? 9. What do you do when a delegated task gets done wrong? 10. How do you communicate effectively to other employees, co-workers, and or patients? 11. How do you treat your employees, co-workers, and or patients equally?
    You may even want to write a post to include what city you are in and how you like to sit down and interview a nurse manager.

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    Quote from PsychGuy
    If you want gastro then you'll have med school, residency, and then a fellowship as well. I've read some articles about streamlining medical education and reducing many of the prereqs required for matriculation. They learn extensively more in school/residency than any NP program could ever offer although that makes NPs gasp. I'm in a NP program myself, and although I listen and read with vigor I still don't know near what the docs I work around know. If I could go to a psychiatric-specific med school eliminating rotations in ob/gyn, surg, an entire year, and follow up with a two year or less residency I'd do it. However, even though I have a passionate interest in psychiatry and mental health I don't want to work in the field bad enough to go to med school for four years and then go through a psych residency for four years. Eight years to get a job isn't practical to me.
    Not true. They are starting fellowship training for nurse practitioners. Refer to the link posted in this thread.

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    Quote from xxdumaxx
    What comment?
    Probably the stereotype comment made that some may fin offensive or racist.

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    Quote from Dranger
    Depends on the chemistry. Real inorganic or o-chem meant for pre-med? No way in hell. Even so I caution anyone taking online chem, physics or A and P. Maybe general bio....
    I was speaking of gen chem. Why the caution? I do believe it was much harder not being in a class but I had no choice with my work schedule.

  • 3
    lady_stic, propofool58, and Spoiled1 like this.

    Quote from kbl7td
    1. I've never applied... 2. Bringing up a GPA is difficult when you have 200hrs+ 3. When I said my GPA wasn't good, I meant that it was just above the minimums. I disagree about the shadowing...I fail to see how 50+ hours of shadowing and 10+ intubations wouldn't look good on a CV. It shows desire to be in the field, initiative to learn before school, and real hands on experience that you won't get anywhere else. I don't know any floor or ICU nurses that intubate, ever. In fact, pretty much the only people that intubate are EMS personnel, docs, and CRNAs.
    I agree it doesn't hurt but once you get into school you will find out how little intubating means. Managing the airway as a whole is the most important. I did over 1,000 cases and intubated 500 or so times but I managed the airway very time.

    I sat on the adcom my senior year and reading about the one student who got to intubate in the OR did not impress me. I have let nurses intubate as well but they were limited in what they did. I showed them the cords and had them place the tube through. Almost like T-ball. I set the ball up and they hit it off the tee. Not to knock your OR experience bc shadowing shows initiative to give up your free time. Good luck to you.

  • 0

    Quote from ChrisAce
    I have taken 2 chemistry classes and I cannot imagine doing the lab portion online. I do not see how that is even possible; you work with strong acids, along with soft metals that cannot be exposed to air because they are highly combustible. Chemistry class is pretty intense.
    You get a full lab kit with beakers and a Bunsen burner. Maybe we didn't have combustible metals but I'm also sure it wasn't needed because I did indeed complete two chemistry classes online. Chemistry class was intense. IMHO it was more math than anything else. That was the toughest part because I had to teach myself with help from the extra workbook I bought to work out all the problems forward and backward. The tests are timed and it would be impossible to be able to complete the equations without knowing how ahead of time.

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    Quote from 1soon2brn
    Has anyone taken an online chemistry class? If so what school and professor do you recommend? Can you please give some insight?
    Pikes peak community college. Expensive with a lab kit but it suited my class availability while working fulltime. Get the extra book that has practice formulas. Chemistry is a lot of math and some science.

  • 2
    elkpark and SRNA4U like this.

    Quote from matthewandrew
    Although the APRN roles are distinct in their own right, this shouldn't mean that Advanced Practice should be fragmented as well. I want to suggest why not rename all the APRN roles, CRNA, NP, CNM and CNS into one singular term, Nurse Practitioner. CRNA = Anesthetic NP CNM = Obstetric NP CNS = Clinical Specialist NP NP = (Insert Specialty) NP NP is already very well known to the public. I think this would not only lessen confusion but improve the public image of Advanced Nursing. It would also unify all the roles, just like every other health profession. Why keep the alphabet soup in our profession (eg: RN BSN MSN CRNA CNM CNS DNP ETC ETC ETC)? Matthew Andrew, NP Another BOLD idea for our profession... thoughts?
    In the end it would be changing one alphabet soup for another. I prefer CRNA for myself. Nurse practitioners already have their multiple initials for their different disciplines and I believe they deserve to keep their titles without other advanced nursing disciplines taking away from their profession.


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