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HisTreasure, ADN, RN 9,128 Views

Joined Apr 27, '04 - from 'New York'. HisTreasure is a BSN student. She has '10' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Pediatrics'. Posts: 822 (16% Liked) Likes: 436

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  • Mar 9

    Quote from systoly
    OP, i know you mean well by trying to cover for or excuse the sleeping
    my question to you, if something happens to the pt. while the nurse is sleeping and you know this is going on
    aren't you (going to feel) responsible?
    to everyone who thinks it's ok to nap, sleep, rest: are you going to be ok with the fact this happened on your shift
    of course it's hard to stay awake, but i'd rather sit on a thumbtack than having to explain why i don't know when the
    pt stopped breathing
    Ultimately, because she was my foster daughter I was responsible for her safety whether we had nursing coverage or not, which is why when we caught her sleeping the initial time we became more vigilant with our spot checks the following nights. I do believe in first chances, and even second chances in some instances, and therefore I felt compelled to allow her to come back. As I've very honestly said, I've dozed off on night shift before. Not laid out, but I recall my eyes getting heavy, reminding myself I needed to walk and opening my eyes 6 minutes later and I knew I had dozed off. For SIX WHOLE MINUTES! Unacceptable!!!! It happened and I am not proud. I went into that shift well rested, I drank coffee before and during the first half, I had busy work, I was in a well-lit area, everything... and it happened. So, I can't, in good conscience, hold someone to a higher standard than I hold myself knowing I've made mistakes. I had a second chance. I re-evaluated how I worked at night to ensure that I never dozed off again. I learned from my mistake, and thank God, no one was ever harmed. I wanted to offer that same chance to her to become a better person, a more proficient nurse, and/or learn that nights does not really work for her. Meanwhile, we were hyper vigilant in the following nights to ensure our child's safety. Does that make sense? We misjudged her. Plain and simple, and I am thankful nothing bad happened. And yes, I would've felt responsible if something happened on her shift, but I would've felt responsible should anything had happened on anyone's shift.

  • Mar 9

    Quote from marycarney
    Having been a night shift PDN in the past - I don't feel you over-reacted at all.
    I have inadvertently nodded off on a case, and it scared the bejeebers out of me. I had to give up a case where the parents wanted me to sit in a darkened bedroom with their sleeping child ALL NIGHT LONG - it is virtually impossible to stay awake (I ended up standing up most of the night).
    Not saying this is the case with you, but some parents are so totally unrealistic about the conditions they force the nurse to work under (sit in the dark and stay awake, no shoes, turning the heat down to 50 overnight etc....) that it makes me wonder at times about how OSHA regulations apply to home care nurses.
    YES! ^^This. I have worked to optimize the conditions to be condusive for work and sleep. I do have a unique perspective because I have worked PDN nights and I've been on shift in homes where it's pitch black, white noise, working by penlight. Really????! I also allow them to go downstairs if she's stable and IF the camera is on the monitors and the monitors are turned up. I know people work differently. One of our newer nurses from PSA likes it dim and she brings her iPad and earphones. I'm not a fan of the earphones so much but she's proven she hears the slightest change in breath sounds so I allow it even though I initially thought it would be problematic. I even allow access to coffee all night and supply sodas, water, juice, and snacks in a small pantry/dorm fridge in the closet. I try to be the best mom I can be and provide a great working environment... but sometimes it's not enough and some people aren't great fits for every case. She was a good nurse, when she was awake. She'd make a STELLAR day nurse... on a unit... with other nurses. I totally filed a report and made some calls though!

  • Feb 7

    Quote from systoly
    OP, i know you mean well by trying to cover for or excuse the sleeping
    my question to you, if something happens to the pt. while the nurse is sleeping and you know this is going on
    aren't you (going to feel) responsible?
    to everyone who thinks it's ok to nap, sleep, rest: are you going to be ok with the fact this happened on your shift
    of course it's hard to stay awake, but i'd rather sit on a thumbtack than having to explain why i don't know when the
    pt stopped breathing
    Ultimately, because she was my foster daughter I was responsible for her safety whether we had nursing coverage or not, which is why when we caught her sleeping the initial time we became more vigilant with our spot checks the following nights. I do believe in first chances, and even second chances in some instances, and therefore I felt compelled to allow her to come back. As I've very honestly said, I've dozed off on night shift before. Not laid out, but I recall my eyes getting heavy, reminding myself I needed to walk and opening my eyes 6 minutes later and I knew I had dozed off. For SIX WHOLE MINUTES! Unacceptable!!!! It happened and I am not proud. I went into that shift well rested, I drank coffee before and during the first half, I had busy work, I was in a well-lit area, everything... and it happened. So, I can't, in good conscience, hold someone to a higher standard than I hold myself knowing I've made mistakes. I had a second chance. I re-evaluated how I worked at night to ensure that I never dozed off again. I learned from my mistake, and thank God, no one was ever harmed. I wanted to offer that same chance to her to become a better person, a more proficient nurse, and/or learn that nights does not really work for her. Meanwhile, we were hyper vigilant in the following nights to ensure our child's safety. Does that make sense? We misjudged her. Plain and simple, and I am thankful nothing bad happened. And yes, I would've felt responsible if something happened on her shift, but I would've felt responsible should anything had happened on anyone's shift.

  • Feb 4

    Thank you for your reply! (Everyone else too!) We don't have the camera for the nurses, we have the video baby monitors because all of the foster children placed with us are MWO (maximum watchful oversight). The cameras are provided by the foster care agency due to issues in the past three placements. I can't really get into it, but it has zero to do with trusting the nurses and everything to do with the placement contract I signed with my private agency and the county social workers. As I mentioned, the nurse has access to the other monitor to use when not in direct contact with the children; we keep one in our room and one downstairs so it's not to watch the nurses- it's to watch the children, only. The sibling has a baby monitor in their room as well, so it's a total of 4. Not just in Gem's room. I understand how that can make people uncomfortable, but there is very little I can do to change the situation; I simply have to pray people are sent into my home understand the reasons for the monitor and know that we aren't sitting there staring at the monitor, hoping to "catch" someone.



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