Content That MedChica Likes

Content That MedChica Likes

MedChica, CNA, LPN 8,143 Views

Joined May 18, '10 - from 'Tampa'. MedChica is a I float everywhere.. She has '3.5' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Psych, LTC/SNF, Rehab, Corrections'. Posts: 578 (52% Liked) Likes: 1,016

Sorted By Last Like Given (Max 500)
  • Mar 30

    - Pay them more

    - Decrease the staff/patient ratio

    Much happier CNAs

  • Mar 30

    While a noble idea I think your highly misguided. Without nurses you have no CNAs. Period. Put the compensation plan into better staff ratios. Better ratios > more effective staff >> happier staff + happier residents + happier families and reduced negative outcomes when you have proper ratios of adequately paid staff

  • Mar 30

    I suggest you put money into safe patient/staff ratios, not fake rewards.

  • Mar 30

    Instead of some gimmick that can and WILL be manipulated, put the money where it really matters. Safe ratios would not only result in better outcomes, but also potentially make your company a leader in the LTC industry.

  • Mar 28

    Quote from TheCommuter
    In most cases you'll need several years of hands-on patient care experience as a floor nurse before you'd become qualified for administrative nursing positions (e.g. nurse executive, chief nursing officer, assistant director of nursing services).

    How would you be able to effectually lead a team of bedside nurses in the clinical setting if you have never walked a mile in their shoes?
    And even if you *did* manage to find a job, you'd be hard pressed to garner *any* respect from the nurses in direct-patient care positions.

  • Mar 28

    In most cases you'll need several years of hands-on patient care experience as a floor nurse before you'd become qualified for administrative nursing positions (e.g. nurse executive, chief nursing officer, assistant director of nursing services).

    How would you be able to effectually lead a team of bedside nurses in the clinical setting if you have never walked a mile in their shoes?

  • Mar 28

    Nursing school only teaches a fraction of the necessary knowledge. Experience teaches the rest.

    Practicing nursing under an administrator with no on the ground experience is most nurses' nightmares.

  • Mar 28

    These events are not specific to any facility. It is now the way it is.

    This is caused by corporate America greed. The peons cannot be the change. The voters must elect leadership that does not support corporate greed.

    Excuse me while I Bern up

  • Mar 28

    I work for a broken hospital. Last year after 50+ years of operation we had a situation that, while not harming any patients, was sensationalized to the point of community leaders calling for us to close. That event was the final straw in a long chain cracks that finally broke a once strong and award winning institution.

    Long story short: we used to be known for cutting edge surgical robots use, award winning cardiac care and our stroke center. Fast forward through a decade of corporate mergers, for profit accounting, staffing being cut to the bone, upper level management refusing to make capital improvements while taking yearly bonuses for cost saving and the current healthcare climate and we started to fracture.

    Nursing staff was pushed past any reasonable limits, ancillary staff was cut to the bone and we were expected to do the job of two with antiquated equipment and little training. As the decline became pronounced I was a CNA, often being assigned as the only assistant personnel to a full 40 bed unit. A 40 bed unit full of confused, total assist elderly patients. I was in nursing school at the time and watched as the nurses on my unit were run ragged and left in droves. I received my nursing license in the middle of a hiring freeze. A hiring freeze that was blamed for my nurses taking 7 telemetry patients with one CNA per unit but that meant I could not be hired to assist. When I finally got hired as an RN I received 6 weeks of so called orientation as a new grad and 6 months later I was in charge because I had been there the longest.

    As experienced nurses left for fear of their licenses and for substantial raises, conditions continued to worsen. At this point infection rates and falls were at an all time high, patient satisfaction was at an all time low and we experienced around 200% turn over in a yearlong period. Our entire hospital was an insane mix of travelers, new grads and a very few seasoned nurses. It was not unusual for travelers to leave after one day. Management response was to berate us for not using AIDET and hourly rounding which would magically fix these issues. The facade was cracking and our patients could tell. The family members knew and asked if we were "short" but we were ordered to lie to hide our abysmal staff ratios. The night that sticks in my mind involved having 6 patients, being charge and "secretary" with 14 admissions to the unit. Pumping multiple units of blood into an active GI bleed with a hgb of 6., starting a heparin drip on a confused patient that kept pulling her IV out, another demented patient that had an order for an NG tube and a gallon of bowel prep that had to be given and the supervisor trying to give me a fresh admit that had critical care orders but ICU was already tripled due to no staff. I gave up that night and started looking for a transfer off that unit.

    Around this time the powers that be decided to sell out to another corporation. The "incident" happened and was widely publicized. What was multiple small break in the hospital system was now an open compound fracture with hemorrhage. The media crucified us in spite of state regulatory clearance. The then CEO was given a "no confidence" vote by our board members and left with a whopping one day notice and a fat check. The new owners have been patching up the existing infrastructure as best they can but the logistics of modernizing an ancient structure is daunting.

    Even more daunting is the task of rebuilding a nursing team. The reputation for killer workloads and unsafe staffing has made it difficult to get applications from anyone other than new grads, nurses fired elsewhere or people who are relocating. I now work in the ED and hear first hand every day how tarnished our name is in the community. Quality improvement measures and staff training have supposedly cut infection rates and falls substantially but it could be argued that the decrease in census after the news coverage may have improved staffing ratios with the same effect.

    Everywhere I turn in allnurses, professional journals, nursing articles I hear "be the change you want to see"or something to that effect. What I don't know is how how this situations changes after this, for better or for worse. Right now I just know it is broken.

  • Mar 27

    Ick, but the nail clipping wouldn't really be what bothered me. I'd be ticked off that they are sitting on their butt while the rest of us are running around like chickens with their heads cut off. Had a coworker spend alot of time surfing the net last week while the rest of us were overwhelmed and I sure did want to say something to her. I do know that I won't break my neck to help her out someday

  • Mar 27

    I don't think I've ever seen so many people have such a negative reaction towards nails, lol. Yikes

  • Mar 27

    What is she thinking
    Doing her nails on the clock
    Unprofessional

  • Mar 27

    I worked inpatient locked department psych for too long to let a few fingernails bother me. Toenail clippings would be marginal.

  • Mar 27

    Not all that important to me, but on the other hand, it's one of a long list of things that it would never occur to me to do at work.

  • Mar 27

    Just reading that gives me an idea of how unorganized you may be at work. It actually made my head start to hurt a little bit. Do you use any sort of cheat sheet to help you remember to tie up loose ends? I find it helpful to keep a short list (index card sized) of "must complete" tasks with me at all times. I constantly refer to the list, add new tasks, erase completed tasks and re-prioritize.

    It was OK to wait for the fax, initially ...but when the fax didn't come (within a few hours) it should have been followed up on. Your supervisor's reaction was a little severe, but I get the impression this is not the first thing about your work that has upset her. From what you wrote, it also seems you are quick to "pass the buck" and blame others when things don't go right. That can be infuriating to people trying to correct or guide you.

    My "tough love" response would be to get organized and use common sense. Don't say, "Jill told me to leave all the bed rails down so it's not my fault the patient fell and fractured his skull." And when you do get corrected, own it. Let the person know that you understand what you did wrong and why it was wrong. And most importantly, let them know what you plan to do differently in the future.


close
close