Content That MedChica Likes

Content That MedChica Likes

MedChica (7,161 Views)

Joined May 18, '10. Posts: 533 (51% Liked) Likes: 915

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  • Feb 2

    When you assume you make an *** out of you & me.

    Ha ha, see what I did there!

  • Feb 2

    As a single person who has heard all the comments from my co-workers with children, I have given exactly this reply:

    "We all make choices in life for various reasons. My time is not any less valuable than yours because I am single. You had the children and it is your responsibility to figure out how you are going to arrange your schedule, not mine."

    It's rather disrespectful to assume that singles should shoulder the burden of weekends, holidays and nights.....just because.

  • Feb 2

    Quote from OCNRN63
    I remember many years ago I would frequently fill in on nights. Not only did day shift straggle in late (we're talking 15-20 minutes late), they expected me to have a pot of coffee on for them and would have major attitude if I didn't make it.
    That pot of coffee would be decaf every time if they pulled that crap with me.

  • Feb 2

    Quote from Mavrick
    You are exceptionally good at rationalizing. Too bad you're too exceptional to follow a simple policy intended for everyone.
    If the shift start is 7AM what is the issue of she's clocked in and ready to go at 6:51?

  • Feb 2

    If you're not ten minutes early, you're late? No way. Stop giving away your time.

    The hours you're actually paid for are sufficient to do your job. I'm ready every day (I suppose 95% would be accurate; not a single person here is perfect) to take report on time. Many of my colleagues have been there 15-30 minutes, looking up their patients' charts. I get snide remarks, usually from management or charge nurses, about always arriving on the dot or being the last to arrive--despite never getting complaints about not knowing my patients or not getting my work done.

    Likewise, when I'm charge nurse, don't come 30 minutes early asking for the patient assignments so you can start reading charts. Yes, usually I had it done long ago, but I simply don't have time to deal with day shift questions at 0600.

    If people arrive early all the time, it sets an expectation. It tells the management you don't value your own time. It gives the new grads an idea that this is acceptable, even admirable behavior.

  • Aug 1 '15

    Quote from Adele_Michal7
    Oh I thought of another one!

    I'll be pulling meds or doing some other nurse task. A CNA will walk up to me and say, "Patient X needs to talk to you." (I despite that statement, but that's for another thread.)

    I walk into patient's room and they ask for the remote, or for fan to be turned on/off... Um... Do they not realize that the staff member who *just* walked out of their room could have done this?!
    EXACTLY!!! Drives me nuts. Then patients wonder "what's taking us so long" to get to their actual nursing needs. Because we are needlessly spending time in patients rooms.

  • Aug 1 '15

    Quote from Asystole RN
    It is ALWAYS the nurse's call to whether they give a medication or not...always. We are a separate profession from medical doctors, we are not the hands of medical doctors. But either way this was a patient education scenario where the patient was notified that clarification from the physician would be needed.

    Now the nurse needs to clarify the order but if the orders conflict with the nurse's professional judgment of safe practice then the nurse is duty bound to take immediate measures to protect their patient. It is always, always, always, the call of the person who actually gives the med.



    I have no HH experience, but in the hospital I'm always fully aware that if I dispense a med r/t a questionable order, I'm the one who's going to be hung out to dry.
    I actually work with nurses, usually the younger ones, who'd give anything without question. They're under the assumption that following a doctor's order protects them.

    HH is a totally different animal than working in the hospital. A lot of autonomy. I see nothing wrong with what the OP did.

  • Aug 1 '15

    Quote from Jory
    They are correct. It's not your call to make. The correct response is if the physician did not give a hold range, call the physician and ask if you should hold it and then ask for a hold protocol in the future.

    No matter how obvious it is...it's ok to delay when a BP is that low, but outside of an order you still have to call the physician if you don't give a medication for any reason.
    Quote from SWRNUSA
    So I am a home care RN. I felt it was within my scope of practice to tell a pt not to take their bp med lisinopril if their bp was <90/60 and they were dizzy and that the md would need to be notified if that happened.
    It is ALWAYS the nurse's call to whether they give a medication or not...always. We are a separate profession from medical doctors, we are not the hands of medical doctors. But either way this was a patient education scenario where the patient was notified that clarification from the physician would be needed.

    Now the nurse needs to clarify the order but if the orders conflict with the nurse's professional judgment of safe practice then the nurse is duty bound to take immediate measures to protect their patient. It is always, always, always, the call of the person who actually gives the med.

  • Aug 1 '15

    They are correct. It's not your call to make. The correct response is if the physician did not give a hold range, call the physician and ask if you should hold it and then ask for a hold protocol in the future.

    No matter how obvious it is...it's ok to delay when a BP is that low, but outside of an order you still have to call the physician if you don't give a medication for any reason.

  • Jun 21 '15

    I would love to be the Oracle of Honesty.

    You have bad breath.
    That outfit makes your butt look big.
    No, he will not leave his wife to marry you.
    You have the softest skin I've ever touched.
    She is too young for you.
    You need to take that screaming brat home.
    Those boobs are too big.
    I think you're faking it, knock it off.
    That is one ugly baby.
    There is such a thing as a stupid question and you just asked it.
    I don't care how many questions it took for you to pass/fail the NCLEX.
    Yes, I am for real.

  • Jun 21 '15

    Quote from ICUman
    Camming.

    Oooooh, you devious little poster, you!

  • Jun 21 '15

    Fluffer


    (kidding!)

  • Jun 21 '15

    See what happens when you don't mentioned 'sex' or 'pot' in the title, everyone ignored you.

  • Jun 20 '15

    Quote from HazelLPN
    I hate it when corporate greed takes priority over quality nursing care.
    I'll give you a BIG ​AMEN on that one!

  • Jun 20 '15

    I hate it when corporate greed takes priority over quality nursing care.


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