Latest Likes For FNP2B1

FNP2B1, BSN, MSN, RN, APRN, NP 5,842 Views

I work as a dermatology nurse practitioner and love it! I'm politically conservative, speak with a Southern accent and live in Southern California.

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • 7:05 am

    I enjoyed reading all of these responses. I was former ICU RN who went to anesthesia school. I had great grades but decided anesthesia wasn't what I wanted to do. The stress got to me. I finished up as a FNP after dropping out of my SRNA program. My classmates thought I was nuts. I currently work in a dermatology practice in Southern California doing mostly bread and butter general dermatology. When I feel like it I do some cosmetics ie Botox, fillers lasers etc. The cosmetic patients are a pain in the ass. I get paid $200,000 a year in base salary plus benefits working in La Jolla, California. Its a low stress very interesting job. I work with 3 MD dermatologists and 1 surgeon. If you want to make a good living and have a low stress life outside of anesthesia I suggest dermatology as a FNP

  • Nov 28

    Don't believe what everybody tells you about low wages for NPs. It isn't true. I will graduate from my FNP program in two weeks and have accepted an independent contractor NP job where my first year gross earnings will be between $200k and $275k. No sicktime, no paid vacation, nothing in the way of benefits but with that type of cash I can buy my own benefits.

    If you look hard you can find a job that will pay you well. I'm not going to divulge the name of the company I'm with because I feel very lucky to have this job. What I'm doing is taking physicals for Medicare patients in their homes. I take a blood/urine sample, give a pneumonia shot and take a spirometry reading.

    I also have another part time job working for a dermatologist paying a little over 100k per year.

    Was my NP degree worth it. You bet it was financially.

  • Nov 24

    I enjoyed reading all of these responses. I was former ICU RN who went to anesthesia school. I had great grades but decided anesthesia wasn't what I wanted to do. The stress got to me. I finished up as a FNP after dropping out of my SRNA program. My classmates thought I was nuts. I currently work in a dermatology practice in Southern California doing mostly bread and butter general dermatology. When I feel like it I do some cosmetics ie Botox, fillers lasers etc. The cosmetic patients are a pain in the ass. I get paid $200,000 a year in base salary plus benefits working in La Jolla, California. Its a low stress very interesting job. I work with 3 MD dermatologists and 1 surgeon. If you want to make a good living and have a low stress life outside of anesthesia I suggest dermatology as a FNP

  • Nov 10

    Don't believe what everybody tells you about low wages for NPs. It isn't true. I will graduate from my FNP program in two weeks and have accepted an independent contractor NP job where my first year gross earnings will be between $200k and $275k. No sicktime, no paid vacation, nothing in the way of benefits but with that type of cash I can buy my own benefits.

    If you look hard you can find a job that will pay you well. I'm not going to divulge the name of the company I'm with because I feel very lucky to have this job. What I'm doing is taking physicals for Medicare patients in their homes. I take a blood/urine sample, give a pneumonia shot and take a spirometry reading.

    I also have another part time job working for a dermatologist paying a little over 100k per year.

    Was my NP degree worth it. You bet it was financially.

  • Oct 26

    Don't believe what everybody tells you about low wages for NPs. It isn't true. I will graduate from my FNP program in two weeks and have accepted an independent contractor NP job where my first year gross earnings will be between $200k and $275k. No sicktime, no paid vacation, nothing in the way of benefits but with that type of cash I can buy my own benefits.

    If you look hard you can find a job that will pay you well. I'm not going to divulge the name of the company I'm with because I feel very lucky to have this job. What I'm doing is taking physicals for Medicare patients in their homes. I take a blood/urine sample, give a pneumonia shot and take a spirometry reading.

    I also have another part time job working for a dermatologist paying a little over 100k per year.

    Was my NP degree worth it. You bet it was financially.

  • Oct 6

    I enjoyed reading all of these responses. I was former ICU RN who went to anesthesia school. I had great grades but decided anesthesia wasn't what I wanted to do. The stress got to me. I finished up as a FNP after dropping out of my SRNA program. My classmates thought I was nuts. I currently work in a dermatology practice in Southern California doing mostly bread and butter general dermatology. When I feel like it I do some cosmetics ie Botox, fillers lasers etc. The cosmetic patients are a pain in the ass. I get paid $200,000 a year in base salary plus benefits working in La Jolla, California. Its a low stress very interesting job. I work with 3 MD dermatologists and 1 surgeon. If you want to make a good living and have a low stress life outside of anesthesia I suggest dermatology as a FNP

  • Aug 16

    I enjoyed reading all of these responses. I was former ICU RN who went to anesthesia school. I had great grades but decided anesthesia wasn't what I wanted to do. The stress got to me. I finished up as a FNP after dropping out of my SRNA program. My classmates thought I was nuts. I currently work in a dermatology practice in Southern California doing mostly bread and butter general dermatology. When I feel like it I do some cosmetics ie Botox, fillers lasers etc. The cosmetic patients are a pain in the ass. I get paid $200,000 a year in base salary plus benefits working in La Jolla, California. Its a low stress very interesting job. I work with 3 MD dermatologists and 1 surgeon. If you want to make a good living and have a low stress life outside of anesthesia I suggest dermatology as a FNP

  • Aug 5

    Don't believe what everybody tells you about low wages for NPs. It isn't true. I will graduate from my FNP program in two weeks and have accepted an independent contractor NP job where my first year gross earnings will be between $200k and $275k. No sicktime, no paid vacation, nothing in the way of benefits but with that type of cash I can buy my own benefits.

    If you look hard you can find a job that will pay you well. I'm not going to divulge the name of the company I'm with because I feel very lucky to have this job. What I'm doing is taking physicals for Medicare patients in their homes. I take a blood/urine sample, give a pneumonia shot and take a spirometry reading.

    I also have another part time job working for a dermatologist paying a little over 100k per year.

    Was my NP degree worth it. You bet it was financially.

  • Aug 3

    My prior job was doing house calls in California. I worked for a MD and we split the revenues 51/49% based on net collections. Dealing with Medicare and all insurance is a pain in the arse. When I working there I averaged between $185k to $202K. I'm assuming if I worked alone I'd be grossing at least $400k but then you have to pay staff, pay for billing, supplies, travel etc. I'm sure it's lucrative if you do it yourself but it is not an easy job. Some patients homes are just covered in code brown. I can remember literally having to jump over puddles of poop. The resident there didn't seem to mind and APS said she was doing just fine. SMH

  • Aug 3

    My prior job was doing house calls in California. I worked for a MD and we split the revenues 51/49% based on net collections. Dealing with Medicare and all insurance is a pain in the arse. When I working there I averaged between $185k to $202K. I'm assuming if I worked alone I'd be grossing at least $400k but then you have to pay staff, pay for billing, supplies, travel etc. I'm sure it's lucrative if you do it yourself but it is not an easy job. Some patients homes are just covered in code brown. I can remember literally having to jump over puddles of poop. The resident there didn't seem to mind and APS said she was doing just fine. SMH

  • Aug 2

    My prior job was doing house calls in California. I worked for a MD and we split the revenues 51/49% based on net collections. Dealing with Medicare and all insurance is a pain in the arse. When I working there I averaged between $185k to $202K. I'm assuming if I worked alone I'd be grossing at least $400k but then you have to pay staff, pay for billing, supplies, travel etc. I'm sure it's lucrative if you do it yourself but it is not an easy job. Some patients homes are just covered in code brown. I can remember literally having to jump over puddles of poop. The resident there didn't seem to mind and APS said she was doing just fine. SMH

  • Jul 26

    I do this and get paid $80 per visit for just the physical assessment. If I get labs ie blood or urine they pay an extra $20 so I try to get labs on all of my patients. $100 per visit with 10 visits a day on average. I usually get done with each patient in 30 to 45 minutes. The more you do it the quicker you get at it.

    Made $800 to $1000 on most days. No bennies, working as an independent contractor. I believe Medicare reimbuses the company around $217.00 for the assessments.

    Great way to make bank.

  • Jul 26

    I work full time doing house calls. My patients for whatever reason can not make into a clinic. Most have mobility issues. It is the best job I've ever had. I work with two other internal medicine doctors, two podiatrists and an opthamologist. We have medical assistants that drive us from home to home for appointments. You are providing the same type of primary care that you would provide in a medical office. I bring all of my supplies and drugs with me that I would need to use in an office. The compensation is great but you have to negotiate. All of my patients are Medicare, very, very complicated sick patients. I think most housecall patients are usually high complex patients. In my situation I get paid 51% of net revenues. This year it will be around $180k. I normally work 6 to 7 hours a day. If you can find a job doing house calls, go get it!

  • Jul 11

    Don't believe what everybody tells you about low wages for NPs. It isn't true. I will graduate from my FNP program in two weeks and have accepted an independent contractor NP job where my first year gross earnings will be between $200k and $275k. No sicktime, no paid vacation, nothing in the way of benefits but with that type of cash I can buy my own benefits.

    If you look hard you can find a job that will pay you well. I'm not going to divulge the name of the company I'm with because I feel very lucky to have this job. What I'm doing is taking physicals for Medicare patients in their homes. I take a blood/urine sample, give a pneumonia shot and take a spirometry reading.

    I also have another part time job working for a dermatologist paying a little over 100k per year.

    Was my NP degree worth it. You bet it was financially.

  • Jun 24

    As a former drug rep who is now a NP I have a different view. I use them as a resource. These reps know more about the job market for NPs than most NPs do. They go into all of the clinics, know the politics, who has an opening and who is about to get fired. It's a great resource if you want to find out about new jobs around your community. These reps are also the experts on the drugs they promote. They spend their entire day promoting one or two products. If I have a question that I can't find the answer to online I will have them do a "medical inquiry" and have a doc from their company answer my questions regarding drug interactions side effects etc. I always make a point to interact with them if I have five minutes. It's called networking and you can never have enough of that in your career.


close