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FNP2B1, BSN, MSN, RN, APRN, NP 7,729 Views

I work as a dermatology nurse practitioner and love it! I'm politically conservative, speak with a Southern accent and live in Southern California.

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  • 6:06 pm

    Hell no don't work for free! There are so many jobs out there if you will look outside of your metropolitan area. Go look at a FQHCC. They are dying for new graduates who will work there. You may have to move for your first job. It's not the end of the world to relocate for a year or two. You worked too hard for your degree. Don't let anybody take advantage of you.

  • 4:07 pm

    Hell no don't work for free! There are so many jobs out there if you will look outside of your metropolitan area. Go look at a FQHCC. They are dying for new graduates who will work there. You may have to move for your first job. It's not the end of the world to relocate for a year or two. You worked too hard for your degree. Don't let anybody take advantage of you.

  • Dec 8

    I do this and get paid $80 per visit for just the physical assessment. If I get labs ie blood or urine they pay an extra $20 so I try to get labs on all of my patients. $100 per visit with 10 visits a day on average. I usually get done with each patient in 30 to 45 minutes. The more you do it the quicker you get at it.

    Made $800 to $1000 on most days. No bennies, working as an independent contractor. I believe Medicare reimbuses the company around $217.00 for the assessments.

    Great way to make bank.

  • Nov 29

    Her comments are indefensible. They are 100% racist. I hope she loses her license. I would be scared to death to have this RN take care of my child .

  • Nov 28

    Her comments are indefensible. They are 100% racist. I hope she loses her license. I would be scared to death to have this RN take care of my child .

  • Nov 28
  • Sep 5

    I hated the same things you did and felt the weight gain as well. Since I've been doing FNP clinical work I'm in great shape, happy and look forward to every day that I'm working. Anesthesia was just a totally miserable experience for me. I know FNPs who do medspa work that make as much as CRNAs. You were right though.....money isnt everything and doing anesthesia for sure didnt make me happy. Glad to see another gas passer on here who switched from the dark side!

  • Jun 24

    I found this interesting

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are especially likely to work past 65, according to a national workforce survey conducted in 2013 by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) and the National Forum of State Nursing Workforce Centers. Eight percent of registered nurses (RNs)—but 17 percent of APRNs—are 65 or older, it found. About one in four clinical nurse specialists (25 percent) and certified nurse-midwives (23 percent) are 65 or older, and about one in 10 nurse practitioners and nurse anesthetists are 65 or older.

  • Jun 24

    I never plan on retiring as long as I have a sound mind and body. I enjoy working. I couldn't imagine not working. Age 48 now. At a minimum I have another 25 years of working ahead of me until I croak. Most of my relatives drop dead in their late 70s.

  • Jun 17

    I assume that annual physicals and MMSE would be a good starting point. One's primary care provider along with one's trusted peers can make recommendations as to your ability to practice safely.
    I work along with 80 year old dermatologists and primary care physicians who are still practicing and doing it well. These guys works because they love the job. They are still teaching at the university and precepting students and training residents. Age is just a number.

    FWIW, my personal dermatologist is 83 and my primary care physician is 81. I actually prefer to be seen by older practitioners as their 40 to 50 years of experience are priceless.

  • Jun 15

    I found this interesting

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are especially likely to work past 65, according to a national workforce survey conducted in 2013 by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) and the National Forum of State Nursing Workforce Centers. Eight percent of registered nurses (RNs)—but 17 percent of APRNs—are 65 or older, it found. About one in four clinical nurse specialists (25 percent) and certified nurse-midwives (23 percent) are 65 or older, and about one in 10 nurse practitioners and nurse anesthetists are 65 or older.

  • Jun 13

    I assume that annual physicals and MMSE would be a good starting point. One's primary care provider along with one's trusted peers can make recommendations as to your ability to practice safely.
    I work along with 80 year old dermatologists and primary care physicians who are still practicing and doing it well. These guys works because they love the job. They are still teaching at the university and precepting students and training residents. Age is just a number.

    FWIW, my personal dermatologist is 83 and my primary care physician is 81. I actually prefer to be seen by older practitioners as their 40 to 50 years of experience are priceless.

  • Jun 13

    I never plan on retiring as long as I have a sound mind and body. I enjoy working. I couldn't imagine not working. Age 48 now. At a minimum I have another 25 years of working ahead of me until I croak. Most of my relatives drop dead in their late 70s.

  • Jun 13

    I never plan on retiring as long as I have a sound mind and body. I enjoy working. I couldn't imagine not working. Age 48 now. At a minimum I have another 25 years of working ahead of me until I croak. Most of my relatives drop dead in their late 70s.

  • Jun 13

    I never plan on retiring as long as I have a sound mind and body. I enjoy working. I couldn't imagine not working. Age 48 now. At a minimum I have another 25 years of working ahead of me until I croak. Most of my relatives drop dead in their late 70s.


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