Latest Comments by brownhairedgal

brownhairedgal 1,023 Views

Joined Dec 28, '09. Posts: 7 (14% Liked) Likes: 5

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    I was looking at CNA programs in the Charlotte area and I wanted to get everyone's opinions. There are a number of full courses to choose from, general cost is about $500 and vary in time and scheduling, then there are short classes (one day, two day, etc.) that are about $200-$300, and finally there are the refresher classes for skills which are $150-$250 some letting you go back as many times as you need to practice.

    I consider myself pretty adept, especially when it comes to common sense, plus I have access to books as well as testing practice information that a friend gave me who took a short CNA class. There are also videos on YouTube for skills and I have at least one or two people who are willing to let me practice on them.

    I don't really have $500 to spend on a class, so I'm looking more at the short class or maybe just the refresher after studying a lot on my own. I am not sure if I want to tackle the test without any sort of class though I know it is also an option.

    What I am wondering is, do you benefit more in the job setting if you take a full class, or should I just get my certification with the less costly and faster methods so I can start working sooner? and What facilities have you all received your certification at and how was the experience?

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    I've read a few threads on this and honestly I am shocked. I was unaware that students had to practice anything on each other that was invasive or required them to wear any clothing besides scrubs or other professional attire. This concept did not exist for me until I read threads in which people spoke about these practices.

    I do not think it is right for students to have to wear clothing that exposes them, even if it is "just" shorts/bathing suit/bra/sports bra/tank top. Nor do I think it is right for students to have to be examined or touched in any way by another student. If we're going to make it about why I personally don't like it, it is because I don't wear shorts other than when I swim, they are usually knee-length, and I don't swim very often (last time was 2-3 years ago). I don't like to expose my legs for various reasons and I don't want to have to purchase clothing to show off a body part that I don't ever show off, hence why I don't own that type of clothing.

    In previous posts there were people to said it wasn't a big deal, and others who think students should have to because their predecessors had to (and they had to do much more to each other than just bathing- such as catheter insertion, breast/vaginal exams, anal swabbing, etc.), and yet others say it is so that students can learn what it is like to be a patient. Many of these people are saying that those who take issue with it aren't cut out for nursing. This makes no sense to me.

    Other than helping out your classmates by providing a body so they can practice and do their exam on, what benefit does this give you? You will make a friend in class who may or may not help you later? So the benefit here is teamwork? I find it highly unlikely that I will be working with the classmate after I graduate and I don't feel that it is my duty to let someone invade my personal space just because the school we are at doesn't use mannequins and real patients. A student is not the same thing as a licensed professional and I don't want inexperienced people touching me or using my body to practice things like injections or catheters or even bathing. Once they are licensed then I know I can trust that they are being professional and held responsible, until then they are no different than someone in my A&P class going for a biology degree.

    None of this means I will have a problem with other people's bodies or caring for them. My own personal level of comfort for MY body does not mean I won't be able to do my job and do what I need to when caring for another person. My own body being exposed is not something that will help me when I am bathing a patient because I will never be bathed by a patient and I will never be unclothed in front of a patient.

    It seems that people who went to school years ago had to do more to each other than the schools today and if you respond to this I would love to hear what years you went to school (your age is not important) and what your experience and opinions are.

    P.S. This is not about a male/female thing, as I think either gender would bother me just as much.

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    I am wondering as well

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    I am considering a possible move to either Manchester, Durham, Portsmouth, or surrounding areas in the coming years.

    I will be getting my Nurse Aide certification in my current state and I wanted to find out what it would take to challenge the LNA exam in NH. What are the requirements and costs? Basically if someone could give me a run-down of the process it would be very much appreciated. :redpinkhe


    Other questions:
    What is the lowest LNA salary you've heard of?
    What type of shifts are most available?

    I'd like to find a job that is 32 hrs a week and night shift so I can attend school full-time during the day. How likely is that scenario?

    Is being an LNA a requirement in NH for Nursing school? It is in my state which is why I ask, but I don't see that on any of the school's websites I've visited.

    Thank you all for your help!

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    Eastern NC and Charlotte area are at the top of the list but I'd consider anywhere in NC if there was an ideal program that fit what I need.

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    Which hospitals and medical centers pay for or reimburse for education? Where can I find information on those types of programs and where they are offered?

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    I am currently taking the pre-reqs for the Associate Degree in Nursing program at Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) in Charlotte, NC.

    I've had to play catch up with Math because I left high school and got my GED before taking all of the required high school math classes. I completed Beginners and Intermediate Algebra and now I will be able to take College Algebra. I received a B grade in the first class and a C in the second class. A C grade is the minimum you can have to go on to the next level of math. I have not yet taken College Algebra.

    These two lower math classes don't actually apply to the degree, College Algebra is the only Math requirement for the degree, and my current GPA is 3.294.

    How will these lower level math classes affect me in the future? Will they always be on my transcripts? I plan on getting higher degrees when time and money are available, but how high should I set my hopes with my educational background? (GED, lower grades on non-applicable Math classes, community college education, etc.)
    I'll be doing the RN-BSN after I work for awhile, and I'd like to get my Masters in the future and be a Nurse Practitioner, hopefully at a decent school, but I want to know what I can realistically expect.

    Thanks all



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