Latest Comments by NavyNurse92

NavyNurse92, MSN, RN 1,063 Views

Joined Sep 11, '09. Posts: 9 (11% Liked) Likes: 1

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    I currently instruct clinical for two colleges. I can tell you that all nursing schools have uniform regulations. Most, if not all, will say something like, "one pierced earring stud per ear, centered on the earlobe."
    As a clinical instructor, I would never allow that type of piercing or any other while in the hospital as a representitive of my school. Hospitals have similar uniform regulations--just depends on how well they are enforced by management.
    Best advice--no piercing other than center of earlobe & no visible tattoos.

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    With a BSN, you can join the Navy, Army or Air Force. Coast Guard & Marines do not have a medical department. Of course, you must qualify--your degree, age, physical fitness & legal status. You do not have to have a specialty..they take new nurses as well as seasoned nurses with specialties. Yes, it is true that you can retire after 20 years with a pension & benefits. I would also suggest you visit a recruiter for information. There are many programs that may (or may not) be available while you are in school that provide a stipend or other benefit(s). Everything is based on the needs of that particular branch of service.
    I was in the Navy for 20 years & retired in 2006. While in nursing school, I was in a program called "Bachelor Degree Completion Program" (BDCP) that paid me every 2 weeks, I had medical benefits & accumulated leave, accumulated "time-In-rate" and this time counted toward retirement. A great program--but it's not always offered. I happened to be lucky enough to be in nursing school during a nursing shortage that the Navy was feeling--so I got in on this program. There currently is a nurse candidate program. I'm not sure what that entails--but I do know you need to be selected for that ( meaning it is competetive. Hope this helped. Good luck!

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    The job market for new grads is tough in Pensacola. We have at least 5 local schools graduating hundreds of new nurses a year. Having your BSN may help, but you'll have to really be proactive in your search-- bring your resume & application and introduce yourself to the managers of the place you'd like to work.

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    Some hospitals require the instructor be with the students at all times---thus lunch it together...also this teaches you team work. Why did you wait 20 minutes for the others?? Did anyone think to go and help those students that were running behind so that everyone could go to lunch?

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    ProfRN4 likes this.

    I teach clinicals--we have plenty of older students. Some do just fine, but for quite a few, it takes them longer to grasp concepts and master the manual dexterity of equipment like putting together IV tubing, etc. If this is your case, then you MUST put in the time to get these skills--the other student will progress leaving you bewildered and confused if you don't get it and clinicals will not go smoothly for you. Again, this is not every older student, but I do see a trend.

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    Dialysis Guru--Wow..thanks so much. I actually called the recruiter and told her I decided not to persue the dialysis postion any longer after reading so many bad things on this site. Your email confirms that I made the right decision. My mother was actually a Davita pt. in Leesburg, FL. She said there never seemed to be anyone to help when a patient went bad. This is a great site to find out "insider information!" Again--THANK YOU!!

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    Wow--thanks for the insights.
    Anyone else have any comments about Davita??

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    Anyone have any updated advice/insight to working for DaVita Dialysis? I'm in the process for applying for RN job. I see lots of negative comments.

    Also--what about starting pay?? I have 17 yrs exp. as an RN but no dialysis experience. I'd be taking a "willing to train" position.

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    I have an MSN from UoPhx. I truthfully would not recommend it. It is very expensive. (I finished in 2001 and MSN classes were $300.00 per credit--each class was 3 credits.) But mostly I would not recommend it because it is what I call a "generic" MSN. Once you graduate, everyone will ask you what your master's degree is in. They will be expecting to hear "advanced practice, nurse practitioner, administration, education," etc. Well, University of Phoenix is none of those. I did a practicum experience in education--but no where on my diploma does it say that my MSN is nursing education. If I had to do it over again, I'd pick a school that is going to give me a specific education/career track.
    Hope that helps.



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