Latest Comments by mree

mree 936 Views

Joined May 19, '09. Posts: 11 (27% Liked) Likes: 31

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  • 23
    2yearrnba, ChristaRN, OCNRN63, and 20 others like this.

    Dear lord, HOW do you guys in the US not go stir crazy and kill everyone? I'm in the UK, we have (at least on paper) a ZERO TOLERANCE approach to staff abuse. We just won't have it! My most recent example is a patient who screamed verbal abuse at me while I tried to assess her. I called the police, had her removed, then had our yellow/red card process started. She's on a warning now, if there's another incident during a future visit, she'll be red-carded and will only be allowed onto the premises for life or limb saving treatment. If a patient is being demanding, rude, abusive (not due to illness/injury, obviously), we TELL THEM their behaviour is unacceptable, and as long as we're not abusive, unreasonable or threatening ourselves, management will back us. Hats off to US nurses, I would've been struck off several times over by now!

  • 0

    Band 7 = Senior Sister/Charge Nurse in the UK, A&E = ER! It's called Accident and Emergency here.

  • 0

    Pineapple juice!!! Works like a charm

  • 0

    Thanks to all for your views, some interesting replies!

  • 0

    Hi, I recently read about the closure of St Vincents hospital in NY, and it started a debate on another forum I'm a member of about the different attitudes to home birth between the UK and the US. Below is the reply I posted on another allnurses thread about the closure -



    Originally Posted by mree

    I just found this post when searching for info on the closure, as it was mentioned on a UK nurses' forum I frequent. It was brought up as, in the UK, it's encouraged for women to consider home birth if they are considered low risk, but apparently in the US it's discouraged as apparently the US healthcare system seems to think birth is only safe if supervised by a doctor?!!! Is this right, or has someone got it wrong on the UK forum? Here, you only SEE a doctor if there's a problem with your pregnancy, otherwise pregnancy and birth services are midwife-led.
    You're right that homebirths in the US are discouraged, generally.

    There's lots more to say on the topic but I suggest starting a new thread, in the OB or midwifery forum.


    So, I'm starting a new topic as suggested! What does everyone think? Is the medical resistance to home birth and midwifery real in the US, or are we in the UK being mislead on the topic by the media? Why are resistant attitudes developed among medics (if they are)?

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    I just found this post when searching for info on the closure, as it was mentioned on a UK nurses' forum I frequent. It was brought up as, in the UK, it's encouraged for women to consider home birth if they are considered low risk, but apparently in the US it's discouraged as apparently the US healthcare system seems to think birth is only safe if supervised by a doctor?!!! Is this right, or has someone got it wrong on the UK forum? Here, you only SEE a doctor if there's a problem with your pregnancy, otherwise pregnancy and birth services are midwife-led.

  • 1
    CaLLaCoDe likes this.

    I guess it all depends what you're used to! I'm in the UK, and although I'm now an ED staff nurse, I did a lot of Auxilliary and Student Nurse shifts on wards during my training. Standard wards in the UK are usually four 6-bed bays with maybe 4 'side wards', or private rooms. Having every patient in their own room would be my idea of a nightmare! Even now, when admitting patients from the ED to a ward, I regularly get asked by the patient (especially if elderly) to make sure they're not put in a room on their own, they tend not to like being isolated. So, we only put patients in a side ward if they're infective or at the end of their life.

  • 0

    Wow, that sounds complicated!

    Thanks for your replies guys, by the sound of it we don't have it too bad over here after all! What's the job situation like over there? I know it's a huge country, but are there any shortages of nurses/jobs for nurses where you are? We're not too bad at the moment, where I live there's a new wing opening at the local hospital the month after I qualify, and a new Minor Injuries Unit the same month, so hopefully will do OK for a job!

  • 7
    ndynrs, Sterren, cmawrule, and 4 others like this.

    Is this it?

    Surgeon:
    Leaps tall buildings in a single bound
    Is more productive than a train
    Is faster than a speeding bullet
    Walks on water
    Talks with God


    Internist:
    Leaps short buildings in a single bound
    Is more powerful than a switch engine
    Is faster than a speeding BB
    Walks on water if the sea is calm
    Talks with God if special request is approved
    General Practitioner:
    Leaps short buildings with a running start and favorable winds
    Is almost as powerful as a switch engine
    Can fire a speeding bullet
    Walks on water in an indoor swimming pool
    Is occasionally addressed by God


    Resident:
    Barely clears a picket fence
    Loses tug-of-war with a train
    Can sometimes handle a gun without inflicting self-injury
    Swims well
    Talks with animals

    Intern:
    Makes high skid marks on a wall when trying to leap buildings
    Is run over by a train
    Is not issued ammunition
    Dog paddles
    Talks to walls

    Medical Student:
    Runs into buildings
    Recognizes a train 2 out of 3 times
    Wets himself with a water pistol
    Cannot stay afloat without a life preserver
    Mumbles to himself
    Nurse:
    Lifts buildings and walks under them
    Kicks trains off the track
    Catches speeding bullets with her teeth and eats them
    Freezes water with a single glance
    The Nurse IS God!!!!

  • 0

    When you go to get changed into uniform and wonder what shirt (if any) you're going to find under your jacket as you were still asleep when you got dressed.

    I've done an entire ED nightshift in my sleep at the end of a run of nights - it was really busy too, I woke up exhausted!

  • 0

    Hi everyone, I'm a 3rd year student nurse from the North-East of England. We've recently had a lot of fuss made about our education, in particular bursaries and level of qualification, and as I've been 'ghosting' on this site for quite some time, I thought I'd actually register, see what your experiences of studying are, and if we should just stop moaning and be grateful for what we get!

    I'm studying the Diploma course to become a RN. It's 3 years full-time, with 50% of that time spent in the classroom and the other 50% on placement in hospitals, hospices, community healthcare services etc. Our workload is quite academically-weighted, with 70% of our eventual mark being decided by assignment marks and the other 30% by marks awarded by mentors in practice. We're always supernumery when on placement (in theory!) to allow us the time to observe and learn. We get a non-means-tested bursary of about 550 per month. The degree students (same course, marked at a higher level) get a bursary, but it's means-tested so some get very little, and can apply for a student loan to make up the difference. Fees are paid by the NHS for both sets of students. When I qualify, I'll go back a few months later to complete 3 more modules to get a full degree, although I'll pay about 900 for this. We've got a huge anti-nurse sentiment in the UK at the moment, mainly due to underfunding of the NHS and poor staffing levels, but many of the public think it's because of the 'academisation' of nursing careers - they seem to think we should be happy with our lot in life as doctor's hand maidens, wipers of bottoms and holders of hands, not degree-educated and ambitious!

    I'm working part-time as an auxilliary nurse, fitting shifts around my placements at the same hospital. This gets a bit confusing if you're on a ward in student uniform on a morning, then back on the same ward as an A/N on the afternoon! We're trained as part of our course do set up IVs, give medications, cannullate patients, catheterise and carry out wound care, as well as the usual paperwork, care plans, etc.

    I guess I'm just wondering how this compares to your education structure, financial considerations, etc. Most of all, to your experiences?



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