Content That MaverickyMaverick Likes

Content That MaverickyMaverick Likes

MaverickyMaverick 2,064 Views

Joined May 11, '09. Posts: 56 (16% Liked) Likes: 15

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  • Jan 10 '13

    I'm assisting with hiring a new case manager RN and would like to vent about the HORRIBLE quality resumes I am seeing in the mile high stack we're reading through.

    #1 problem: basic spelling, grammar, punctuation and command of the English language. I don't really care if it's your first, second or ninth language. You will need to communicate with and document about our patients in clear, concise, correct and understandable English. Period. Yes, we toss resumes with ONE TYPO in the trash. That typo represents a typo you'd miss on a med list or MD order that could mean life or death.

    #2 problem: length! My goodness, people. We don't need a novel. Even RNs with 10+ years of experience should be able to sum it up in 2 pages or less. We're not interested in reading your past job descriptions. Just hit the highlights that pertain to the position you're applying for, and an accomplishment or two that will get our attention (chaired a committee, piloted a program, won an award). Also, as much as I admire family parenting/elder care, it's not job experience that belongs on a resume, no matter how "special needs" your family members were. (Honestly, I see so much of this on resumes. Inappropriate space filler). Talk about it in the interview!

    #3 problem: listing an "objective." We KNOW what you're applying for and why. The "objective" on a resume died a decade ago, please stop using it! And leave off your high school diploma, no one cares.

    Things we like to see right off the bat:

    Immediate list of 3 or 4 strengths specific to the position
    Bulleted list of licenses, certifications, with issue/expiration month/year
    Any significant continuing education accomplished or in progress (as in, a certification or degree)
    Any languages spoken fluently

    And please. Use a common font like Times New Roman in 12 point, through the WHOLE document. Keep bold/italics/underlining to a minimum. No color. No curlicues. No pictures. No logos. Send it as a PDF *and* Word attachment, embed it in the email AND send or fax a hard copy, that kind of effort gets our attention. So does following up with a thank you.

    Simple stuff. I can't believe the whining I hear from unemployed nurses, then see the back end of things where the majority of the job seekers reflect such poor attention to detail and minimal effort.

  • Nov 1 '11

    Hey all, I just passed my CCRN (with a score of 111/125) and thought I would share my method of preparing.

    I started studying a little over one month before the exam (while working full time) using the Educational Enterprises DVD - CCRN Review Cram with Laura Gasparis Vonfrolio. Once I made some headway into the DVD's I began using the CD that came with Pass CCRN by Donahoe Dennison. I took quizzes and read the rationale until I felt that I could comfortably complete quizzes with at least a 7/10 if not an 8/10. You will find many of the quiz questions to be very helpful for taking the CCRN. I did not find the need to take any 150 question practice quizzes. Be sure to take plenty of quizzes from the professionalism and ethical practice, as Laura does not touch on this area. Bottom line: as long as you study the Review Cram and do quizzes, you'll do great!

    Best of luck!

  • Sep 11 '09

    This to me even includes post abortion care
    This one might be a problem. Abortions, like any medical procedure, can cause complications which might come up in a number of nursing environments. I work primarily in the ER of a Catholic hospital. If a nurse refused to care for a post-abortion complication, a bleed, for example, that would be a pretty big problem.

    I am sure there are other nurses who share your beliefs who manage a professional life without compomising their moral beliefs.
    Good luck.

  • Sep 11 '09

    This to me even includes post abortion care
    This one might be a problem. Abortions, like any medical procedure, can cause complications which might come up in a number of nursing environments. I work primarily in the ER of a Catholic hospital. If a nurse refused to care for a post-abortion complication, a bleed, for example, that would be a pretty big problem.

    I am sure there are other nurses who share your beliefs who manage a professional life without compomising their moral beliefs.
    Good luck.

  • Sep 11 '09

    my advice would to keep your resume short and sweet.

    mine only had my objective, my personal information, and my past employment. it also included the school i graduated from and the degree i got. i wasn't involved in ANYTHING outside of school so i didn't list any of that. mine was like 1/2 a page or something silly like that. anyway, i was hired without any problems. don't try to "over inflate" your resume too much - the longer it takes to glance over, the easier it is for someone to throw it in the trash.

  • Sep 11 '09

    my advice would to keep your resume short and sweet.

    mine only had my objective, my personal information, and my past employment. it also included the school i graduated from and the degree i got. i wasn't involved in ANYTHING outside of school so i didn't list any of that. mine was like 1/2 a page or something silly like that. anyway, i was hired without any problems. don't try to "over inflate" your resume too much - the longer it takes to glance over, the easier it is for someone to throw it in the trash.

  • Sep 11 '09

    Quote from tabswifeRN
    The LTC facility I applied to I did online. I was searching differnt nursing job web sites and thought I would appy just on a fluke and to my suprise they hired me on the spot. wasn't my dream job but it will do for now.
    Is there a dream job in nursing and if so, WHERE?

  • Sep 11 '09

    Quote from tabswifeRN
    The LTC facility I applied to I did online. I was searching differnt nursing job web sites and thought I would appy just on a fluke and to my suprise they hired me on the spot. wasn't my dream job but it will do for now.
    Is there a dream job in nursing and if so, WHERE?

  • Sep 10 '09

    Some people get jobs right away and some people don't. I was one of the blessed/lucky new grads that landed a job about 2 weeks after receiving my license. Here's what I did:
    1) Pray !!! Prayer works. Ask God to give you patience and to help you in your job search
    2) Preserverance. Keep calling, turing in your applications, and resumes until someone says yes. Everyday I would do this and finally someone said " yes" !
    3) Sell yourself. When I went on my interview and I sold myself. I told him ( the DON) how I was willing to learn and that I'm a fast learner. I'm compassionate, can work as a team and etc. He told me that my " new grad" speech is what won him over.
    4) Be optimistic- Every since I started NS everyone has been saying that no one is going to hire new grads and blah, blah, blah. I refused to give into that. I told myself since day one that I will become a nurse and find the right job for me. My positive attitude is what kept me going, even when I didn't have a job I kept believing everyday that I would get one soon.
    5) Don't turn down jobs. If you get offered a job as a nurse take it !!! It can be LTC, Substance abuse, and so on. So what if its not your dream job or your least preferred job... its a job. The job may not even utilize all of your nursing skills but its still a job. As long as the job does not interfere with your moral beliefs than take it. My bottom line is that if you need an income and something to put down on your resume then you should take the job offered to you now and once you get 6months-1 year experience leave that job and go on to something else. I'm sorry but in this economy we have no time to get " picky".
    Last but not least... don't give up your search and don't give up the fight. You have completed nursing school and passed boards so finding a job should be the least of our worries. It'll come at the right time. Keep looking and follow my rules and you will land a job.
    *** Keep applying until.... you get a job. Key word is UNTIL.
    Good luck to all !

  • Sep 8 '09

    I apologize; I did not mean to offend.

    I am curious however; why would you think that nurses would perform different duties based on gender?


  • Sep 8 '09

    [font="tahoma"]we would like to use this thread for posters to post about places that are hiring especially for new grads. thanks for all the tips everyone.

  • Sep 4 '09

    Moved to the First year after Nursing licensure forum

    Have you also tried the state forum?

    Good luck

  • May 27 '09

    Not only does it smell bad, but it also can look just like chicken gumbo from the hospital cafeteria.

    Side note: I think it smells less bad than what I'm calling "liverhead" poop these days. A combo of huge doses of lactulose, a diabetic diet on someone with very little liver function and on dialysis, and this stuff looks like boiled playdoh. I can't even begin to describe the smell but one day I will possibly faint from it.

  • May 27 '09

    LMAO! I've never had the pleasure, but I did have a doc order a C-diff on a patient last week and I almost said "I don't think it stinks enough to be that" because of everything that's been said here!

    Heather

  • May 27 '09

    Quote from cnartnow
    For your information, my patients request me over other CNA's. HMMMM....And another thing, I dont stay til 7......I stay until my work is done even if that means sitting BEDSIDE with some who was just admitted.
    Be careful with those patients stating, "You're the bestest CNA and I only want you 'cause CNA Groucho does (this that and the other thing)". This is a very common stunt of very manipulative patients. Kill ya with kindness and compliments and then they've gotcha....

    That is fantastic that you choose to stay after the end of your shift and that your facility allows it!
    In places that I have worked (and currently work), employees are warned, written-up and finally fired for unapproved OT.
    A person who clocks out and continues to work off the clock (read: working for free/martyr), it wrong, IMO. Why on earth would you work for free and sell yourself short? This is exactly why Nurses have such a difficult time getting the pay that they are really worth. Why should a facility pay a Nurse more, heck, the Nurses will work for free!
    I know people that have been injured and have lost their Work Comp. cases because their work was
    1. unauthorized
    AND
    2. off the clock.
    Sure, some people do win, but it is a lot harder to fight.


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