Latest Comments by SentimentalGeek - page 4

SentimentalGeek, RN 3,432 Views

Joined May 6, '09. Posts: 84 (24% Liked) Likes: 28

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  • 1
    live4ever likes this.

    Quote from dianell328
    I keep thinking maybe she's jealous because she's a 40 yr old CNA and I'm doing something to better myself.
    You may be on to something there. You could try encouraging her to further her studies. Don't let her get you down, stay positive and maybe by encouraging her if that's something she wants to do would show her that support is the way to go, not dragging each other down. If she's not interested, then just let it go in one ear and out the other. We can't control other people's actions or words, but we CAN control how we react to them and let them affect our own lives.

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    I'm a Fall 2012 applicant, will be taking my TEAS at some point in the next couple of months so I'm hoping to do well on that! GPA-wise I'm fine and dandy, so I think it's all hanging on that TEAS score. My school is a points-based ranking system.

    A&P 1 and 2 are worth 20 points x GPA (so 20 x 4.0 for an A earned)
    Microbiology and Chem are worth 15 points x GPA
    Comp 1, Psych, and Human Growth and Dev are worth 10 points x GPA

    They then add in the actual points score of TEAS and the ATI critical thinking test and rank applicants accordingly. They will be accepting 16 students only!

    So far I have all A's except for Comp which I took in high school when I was lazy and got a B. Taking A&P 2 and Human Growth/Dev this semester and anticipate A's so hopefully I'm in good shape. Like you, all I can do is wait and see!

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    I'm pretty excited, I start orientation next week for my first CNA job. I'll be working in the float pool at the hospital, so will have the opportunity to work in most units. I'm hoping to get into nursing school this fall, so this is great since I'll get to know a good chunk of the hospital before I even start nursing clinicals! I'm a little nervous about not having a "home" unit but looking forward to the challenge of getting to know each different unit and all the people there.

    Has anyone else started out in a float position in a hospital with no prior experience? I'd welcome any advice!

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    Fiona59 likes this.

    Actually...we have! We moved back to the US last year and my British husband had to jump through lots of hoops and pay lots of money (and get vaccines, a chest X ray and more) in order to get a resident visa. It's hard for the people who do it legally. Unfortunately doesn't stop the illegals anywhere and makes it completely unfair for the law-abiding people who pay the price. Media sensationalism would have us believe otherwise, but it actually is incredibly difficult to enter the US (or most other places) as a legal permanent resident.

  • 1
    Fiona59 likes this.

    I just noticed you said you plan to move over to live with your boyfriend. This will only be possible if you apply for a (very expensive) resident visa. At the time I went over an unmarried partners visa may have existed (can't remember now) or there is a fiancee visa (which assumes you will get married within 6 months of moving over) or a spouse visa for couples who are already married. You must be able to prove you have sufficient funds for the move and will be able to support yourself (NO access to public funds). They usually like to see a substantial amount of money in savings or assets. This takes a lot of time and planning, you can't just "move to England". If you enter as a tourist they will stamp you for 6 months. If you overstay or attempt to take up any kind of work whilst on a tourist visa, they can deport you and ban you from entering the country for 10 years. Make sure you do your research.

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    Moving to the UK is very difficult unless you are already a British citizen, are married to one, get a student visa to go to a university, or have a degree in a shortage occupation. If none of those scenarios apply to you, I'm sorry to be the bearer of bad news. I'm a dual British/American citizen who went through the UK immigration process before naturalising and from the time I first started out in 2006 until present immigration guidelines have hugely changed. If you are interested in becoming a nurse perhaps you could apply to a UK university and get a student visa. There is no way to transfer your CNA certificate to the UK.

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    I have no idea, but I do know that moving to the UK is very difficult unless you are already a British citizen, are married to one, get a student visa to go to a university, or have a degree in a shortage occupation. Nurse assistants are not on the shortage list. If none of those scenarios apply to you, I'm sorry to be the bearer of bad news! (I'm a dual British/American citizen who went through the UK immigration process before naturalising)

    ETA: I also know that US-trained registered nurses are only able to join the NMC registry in the UK if they have a BSN, ADN trained nurses are not recognised at this time (nor LPNs, I believe).

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    My lab exams this semester consist of a midterm and a final. So the midterm is everything we've covered so far in the semester and the final will be everything after that. Hard work? Yes.

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    Hey, the best advice I can give you is to just keep truckin'! This is the best option for you right now financially since you are working and don't want to pay for a BSN program. I'm in the same boat. I'm choosing to do the ADN first even though I eventually need my Master's because it's SO much more affordable. I understand how you feel with the prereqs taking so long though, I really do. I started back part time to do prereqs in Spring '09 and have been slowly making progress ever since. I finally found myself in a position this semester where I could quit my full time job and work limited part time hours which enabled me to take more classes, but will be going back to work full time after this semester while finishing up my last two classes for (hopeful) entry to the Fall 2012 program. I know it can feel like a waste of time (it will have taken me 5 years by the time I graduate!) but just think how good it feels at the end of each semester to get one step closer to your goal. And once we make it into the program it will all be so worth it! Keep your chin up.

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    I'd recommend taking up any and all help offered by your institution - do you get Supplemental Instructors? Did you get the solutions manual for your text book? If not, it may be worth getting. Mine didn't have the answers to all of the homework problems (my teacher assigned evens only) but I could work out what to do by looking at the examples for other problems. That's a more efficient way to learn anyway, instead of having the answer handed to you. Each chapter was also reviewed really well in outline format which I found easier to read than the text for certain things.

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    I'm sure each program has different requirements. I applied to mine on the first day of this semester, and I'm taking Micro, A&P 1 and Psych. Next semester will be my last two prereqs (A&P 2 and Human Growth/Development). They keep tabs on our academic progress in our files, but we have to report things such as getting our CNA completed, etc. Decisions aren't made until the last week of May so as long as all prereqs are completed by that date we're fine.

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    Thanks for that! If the McGraw Hill book has more info than the ATI one sounds like the ATI practice tests with the book I already have may be the way to go. All replies are much appreciated!

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    Quote from Brian Ruff, CNA
    I would take Chemistry if I were you. You may want to apply to several different schools when the time comes, and since most school's require that class, it would be a good idea to have it.
    Good point!

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    I had to take a semester of Chemistry and I actually really enjoyed it. I had to bust my butt to get an A and it was hard work, but I did learn a lot. Interesting that your programs have dropped it from the required courses! I would personally take it anyway if you have the time but if you have other classes to take with a heavy workload then take something fun instead. OR see if you can take some classes from within the program to ease your workload once you're in the nursing program. Like pathophysiology, pharmacology, etc. Nutrition and Diet Therapy is part of my nursing program but I took it early to get it out of the way. All I'll have now first semester is theory and clinicals, no extra stuff.

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    VolunteerCPR likes this.

    I'm on the same eventual path as you (would like my MSN to be a nurse-midwife and would also like a cert in women's health) and I've decided to start out small. The ADN degree from my community college is much cheaper than going straight for a BSN, and I can work and be paid a decent salary while finishing my BSN prereqs (from the community college) and eventually do a bridge program. One thing to keep in mind is that sometimes prereqs DO expire, so it would be worth it to continue with your education immediately after graduation to keep moving through. The MSN program I'm looking at says that prereqs expire after 10 years. That may not be an issue for you but I started college the first time around 10 years ago (still not sure how that happened! ) and will probably need to petition my future MSN school to accept the old classes. All of my sciences are current though, thankfully!


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