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Joined Apr 12, '09. Posts: 108 (17% Liked) Likes: 23

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  • Feb 13

    Quote from adventuRNurse
    I'm also a step down/progressive nurse 4 years experience, really looking into travel nursing, hopefully to start contracts by May! yay! Any tips for a progressive travel nurse? Specific agencies you like working with or locations/hospitals that rocked??
    Get another specialty, not worth it as a stepdown RN. Travelers are usually trying to make money. L&D, OR and CVICU are the hot specialties.

  • Feb 13

    Quote from Heavybabycake
    I live in the southeast. My base pay is 85k. With overtime I can make around 95k. I work 7am-5pm in an outpatient clinic that's affiliated with a major hospital. No weekends or nights, off on holidays. When I started as a RN seven years ago I made 52k. I job-hopped to get big pay increases. Cost of living is relatively low in my area. I only have an ASN.
    You know any Kaiser employees in that area?

  • Feb 13

    Weekend option + a shift a week through an agency = $96,000/year.

  • Feb 13

    Tell your daughters to look into Travel nursing after getting a year or two of experience. Try going for the high paying specialties like NICU, ICU, L&D. You can make pretty close to that amount of money while being paid to travel all over and see the country as well.

  • Feb 13

    I'm late replying to a few people who had a problem with my comment, but sometimes I wonder if you ever think about your money and appreciate how much you make compared to someone who does not or didn't have the opportunity you have to be where you are today. I'm not talking about starving children in Africa. More like, if you feel like this career isn't about the money, would you do it for a lot less at what you and all the other nurses in existence that work for the sick put up with? Sometimes you HAVE to think about yourself. Not "putting yourself before patients" but how much I've worked and can I afford a vacation?

    I don't know what new grads get placed in and I accept that ignorance that is the experienced nurses' punching bag. The problem is seen, the solution is then made. Was it a good quality solution? No, not what I was looking for. "Nursing isn't about the money" also sounds like "I work 24/7 365 and have no problem if nursing salaries dropped to minimum wage". When I say I hope I get into nursing school, I think I know what I'm willing to deal with and sometimes, not 24/7 365, I'd like to think about taking time off occasionally to reduce some burnout, if I ever come to that point which I guess is common amongst nurses.

  • Feb 13

    Quote from Drphillgood
    I've been a nurse for going on 9 months and like many people said it's all about where you work. I was able to get into a management position at about 85k/yr with extremely good benefits and retirement. So it all depends on where you live and what you want to do.

    On a side note, with the way current tax brackets are if you're shooting for 100k I would go for more like 150k. If you're breaking the 95k mark the new tax bracket basically makes it redundant until you're up over 110-115 unless you have a really good tax man.
    LOL.

    I hear this a lot from nurses about picking up overtime.

    THIS.IS.NOT.HOW.TAXES.WORK.

    Each tax bracket taxes the income that falls within that bracket so if you fall into a higher bracket like lets say the 28% bracket ($91,901-$191,650) only the EXTRA income from $91,901-$191,650 is taxed at 28%. Your income from $37,951-$91,900 is taxed at 25% still etc.

    Don't Fear The Higher Tax Bracket - The Simple Dollar

  • Feb 13

    I make north of 100K as a med surg RN...but it takes me 2 years as I am a 0.6 w/ +1-2 shifts pickup per pay period. I raise my child, go to concerts, and travel. Although I would like to make more, I would not love to imbalance my life with more work.

  • Feb 13

    Quote from TheAtomicStig_702
    I have a question, and most RNs are free to laugh cause I'm sure the ones with experience would probably never do this. If I'm a new grad..and say I get hired on at a hospital doing med surge and my schedule at work is 3 12's for the week...what if I wanted to work at another hospital that scheduled me 3 12's around my other 3 12's? As a second job? Is it doable? Is it recommended? Is it possible? Is it even legal? Has anyone ever done that when they were a new grad or now? I'd only do it for the extra experience and extra income considering I have student loans to pay back and just want them out of my life as soon as possible. (Who doesn't? I have yet to meet anyone with a mortgage to say they love their mortgage)..

    This could be something for the OP. Btw, I'm in Las Vegas and not a nurse yet, just trying to get there and be done with school so I can enjoy life!


    ***Edit: Oh, and I'd probably do it for a year straight because I just hate living as a college student and not having my own money. After that, resign and work either one that I liked the best or keep doing it until I got sick of it. 6 days a week with one day off. I know as a CNA I could work doubles if I wanted to if the hospital or clinic was short CNA's but if nurses typically run 12 hours a day or more, that being a double shift doesn't sound possible or legal. I know one RN that did a triple shift and it was on accident. I hear those are illegal.
    Many nurses work a full-time 36 hour job and a second per diem/PRN job (which can vary in hours from as few as one shift a month to one or more a week). The per diem job usually pays more/hour as it has no benefits. The reason for this is that per diem jobs are very flexible and it's possible to schedule them around your full-time job.

    It's essentially impossible to work two full time nursing jobs, because no full-time job is going to agree to schedule you around another full time job. You absolutely would run in to scheduling problems. It also makes no sense- most jobs have available overtime, and you would make far more working those hours somewhere where you're paid overtime than working a second job where you're somehow at 72 hours without overtime.

    You also probably can't and definitely shouldn't take a second job of any kind while you're still a new grad. You have a *lot* to learn in that first year, which will include didactic classes outside your work time and a lengthy orientation- take the time to learn it properly. Any job that would be willing to hire you PRN as a new grad (and there wouldn't be many) is NOT a place you should work. PRN jobs are typically intended for experienced nurses who need minimal orientation to a unit and specialty. New grads typically need and get 3-6 months of orientation before being allowed to practice independently. You can see why good employers would be reluctant to hire people who need months of orientation for a job where they might only work one shift or less a week, right?

    "Anesthesia nurse" is an advanced practice role that requires completing years more of highly competitive school and an additional licensing process.

    Travel companies do not hire new grads for the same reasons that new grads aren't hired for PRN jobs- they are looking for experienced people who can hit the ground running in an under-staffed unit.

  • Feb 13

    I have made 96-100k the last two years as a NICU RN by working a huge amount of OT and bonus shifts. Also picked up extra skills that pay more. Got a 5% bump for ECMO and a 5% diff when doing transport. Low cost of living area.

  • Feb 13

    I am a WEO nurse and even with an extra shift per week, I am no where near 100K more like 70. This is NC though Agree with PP about where you are and cost of living. I am in school for informatics and I am told it has the potential for 6 figures. Time will tell.

  • Feb 13

    Working in CA (as I have done, but don't live there now) makes it pretty easy to make 100K+ but it comes at a cost. I live in NM and the cost of living here is very reasonable and nursing wages are decent. You can push 90k here without having to work like crazy. In general though nursing is not a 100k/yr job. And since we are shift workers you generally have to work all the time to earn big bucks (as opposed to salaried professionals that get to 'move up' in the world when they work hard). But to answer your question, the OR is probably the BEST place for a nurse to make bank. Because the OR is so bad about training new nurses they are severely short all across the country. And as an OR nurse you often have to do OT or call if you're working in a hospital setting. If you have 3 daughters in nursing school advise them to graduate and become NPs or Pharmacists and they will have a better work environment and be able to easily make $100k per year. But if they insist they want to make money in nursing, then OR, L/D, Cath Lab, ICU, etc will always be the high demand areas and get the best pay.

  • Jan 23

    I just googled the following things and got tons of (actually relevant) hits:

    nurse residency programs in new hampshire

    nurse residency programs in massachusetts

  • Jan 23

    Quote from nicktexas
    Your research seems to have holes. Out of school you can skip other areas and apply to ER residencies. They usually open and close applications before you graduate, so look for them and apply early. If the applications are rolling, you have an advantage if you apply right away. Apply to as many as you can. ER residencies are generally competitive.

    Where do you live?
    I have heard of ER residencies. Unfortunately, it seems there aren't that many of them near me. I think there's one in MA. Either that, or they just don't advertise/talk about the other ones very well. Currently, I live in central-southern MA. I'm most likely going to be going to nursing school in southern NH.

  • Jan 23

    Your research seems to have holes. Out of school you can skip other areas and apply to ER residencies. They usually open and close applications before you graduate, so look for them and apply early. If the applications are rolling, you have an advantage if you apply right away. Apply to as many as you can. ER residencies are generally competitive.

    Where do you live?

  • Jan 23

    I am starting work towards my BSN this fall, and as of now I want to be an ER/trauma nurse. This may change if I discover I actually can't handle that much blood (though I think I can), but that's the plan right now. When I looked into how you get a job as an ER/trauma nurse, it seemed you can't get that position as an entry-level nurse. Instead, it seems you have to work in other areas to gain experience, and sometimes work for extra certifications. How long did you have to work in other areas, and how much certification work and training did you have to do, before you were able to get a job as an ER/trauma nurse? I'm very willing to work longer to achieve this position, I just want to be informed about what it usually entails. Thank you in advance for your answers, I appreciate it!


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