Latest Comments by palmettogirl

palmettogirl 1,525 Views

Joined Oct 16, '08. Posts: 23 (26% Liked) Likes: 13

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  • 1
    surferbettycrocker likes this.

    Hi surferbettycrocker. I think I am nervous about having more patients and adjusting my time management skills. I worked on a med-surg floor for a year, and I feel that every unit has its own routine and time management skills that a nurse has to adjust to. (for example, not having a continuous pulse ox on my patient haha). I think I'm just nervous about change and changing my routine. There are things I like better about ICU and there are things I like better about step-down. I think if you want to try critical care you should go for it! or at least try to shadow to see if you would like it

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    I am about to be in this situation. I have only been in ICU two years though, but now I'm moving to a different hospital. I have a job on a tele/cardiac stepdown floor. I'm nervous but hopefully I'll like it. There are things I like better about the floor and there are other things I like better about the unit so I guess we'll see how this goes...

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    Thanks for your reply! That actually sounds fun to me! haha

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    Okay, this may sound like a dumb question, but is there a difference between cath lab and cath lab prep and recovery? If so, what are the differences? I have been a nurse for two years: one year on tele and one year in ICU. I know cath lab can be intense. I'm not sure if I'm ready or if I need more experience, but i'm going for an interview for a position anway to see more about it. It is called outpatient cath lab prep and recovery. I am just wondering if anyone can tell me a little more about that job description if it is actually different than doing procedures IN the cath lab. Thanks!

  • 2
    lesrn2010 and Ambitiouz like this.

    I couldn't agree more! It's really sad. I was so excited to be a nurse, and now I hate it. I cry before I go to work and I feel like my job intereferes with my everday life. Nights, weekends, and holidays are horrible shifts to work. Some people don't mind it, but I can't do this forever. I feel ya...I just don't know what to do about it...

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    I'm just wondering how long it took ya'll to get pretty comfortable with codes. I transferred to ICU with one year med/surg experience where I saw maybe three codes (none of them were my patient). I am ACLS certified, but I definietly learn by experience so sitting in a classroom learning what to push and even running "mock codes" does not make me feel comfortable until I've been around it. The other day when our patient coded, I almost coded myself. She told me not to be so hard on myself and to give myself a good year before I feel pretty comfortable. I'm just wondering how long it took ya'll? I just want to be like all those nurses I saw confidently running the code.

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    I don't know of any literature because I'm new to ICU as well. (well, I start next week) I do know there is a website: icufaqs.org that has a lot of info and has been really helpful to some of my friends that are in ICU.

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    Thanks for the advice! I did send the e-mail b/c I figured it wouldn't hurt. I got the job!!! So I guess it was worth it!

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    I've been working nights for a year. I think it's best to schedule your nights together or have atleast 2/3 nights off in between in one week. Somtimes you (like if you want to work a weekend, you could do Mon, fri, and sat.) Sometimes you can even schedule yourself to have 6 or 7 You'll learn what you like and what your body can take. Eat healthy and eat before you go into work. Don't do like I do sometimes and not eat before you go in, then shove anything and everything into your mouth at 1am. (That can make you sick). I like nights, I don't want to do it forever, but hopefully you will adjust well. GOODLUCK!

  • 7

    8. You roll your patients into the breakroom with you so you can finally sit down, eat, and watch them at the same time. While at the same time they are giving your fellow coworkers a strip tease, but no one is phased.

    9. You cut a straw for your MVA patient (already sitting at the nurses' station) so he can "smoke" because this is the only way to calm him down

    10. You want to immediately become best friends with the doc who just gave a now order for 5mg haldol (also while you hope and pray

    11. You convince your patient to put his "boxing gloves" on so he can practice his swing. Then tell him we're going for a ride..."so put your 'seatbelt' on so you dont get hurt. (as your putting him in the geri chair and applying his lap belt). Then proceed to take him with you everywhere you go because there are not enough nurses or techs to watch him while everyone is passing out their midnight meds.

    11. You see your brain injured patient several months after discharge back on the floor walking around with physical therapy, looking around like "who are you people", and definitely not remembering the hell he gave you pulling out tube after tube and climbing out of the bed all night...but it's worth it because he's A&Ox3 and walking strong...something you weren't sure could happen again.

  • 0

    Hi guys,
    I interviewed for a position in my hospitals MICU. I thought it went pretty well, but I know there were lots of applicants and most have more nursing experience than me. I was taught in nursing school that it's a good idea to follow up with a "thank you" email or letter. The NM said she would know by this monday or tuesday so a letter is out of the question b/c she'd never get it in time. She told me that she doesn't call, the nurse recruitor would call if I got offered the position. I was wondering if any of you think an e-mail is appropriate or annoying. I want to do something one last time to stand out, but I'm not sure if its appropriate. Any advice on what you did, or if you're a manager, please let me know what stands out to you. Thanks!

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    Also, a telemetry floors may require ACLS too. At least at my hospital they do...

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    The hardest part to me is time management, organization, and knowing that you're responsible for that patient. I'm scared I may not pick up on something as quickly as a more experienced nurse might. But I am very cautious (and hope I always will be) b/c I get so nervous, so that can be a plus sometimes! And it's also difficult coming out of nursing school because you don't just have 1 or 2 patients anymore (with your instructor by your side). There are some things I never saw in orientation that some of my patient's have, but I just get my charge nurse to help me. Sometimes the RN before me will go in the room with me and show me how to do things I may not have seen in orientation. Goodluck!

  • 1
    leslie :-D likes this.

    This is not just your fault. I have had this happen to me several times where the med was not scanned but the nurse before me told me she gave it. I have called the nurse before me to ask if they have given a med and tell them I'm just double checking because it was never scanned. Although, I have just assumed the nurse gave it (since they told me they gave it) and just forgot to scan the med. The vanc should have been hung on first shift. So it's their fault too, not just yours. Like others have said, this is probably not the ONE factor that put them in the unit. if a pt. can go septic from missing one dose of antibiotics, then they needed to be on more aggressive therapy. I have pt.'s getting vanc twice daily for weeks along with every other antibiotic to name...

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    I graduated in December and started my job on a med/surg type floor. (A lot of neuro, but we get general medical pt.s too sometimes). I really wanted to work on a cardiac floor, but it was so hard to get a job where I live that I finally took the job I have now b/c I needed it, and I figured I would get good experience. I'm learning and becoming a little more confident. (I still feel sick on my way to work sometimes, but hopefully that'll go away someday). I have to stay where I'm at for a year and would hopefully like to work in a CCU at my hospital or another one close by if I can. I guess my question is, Do you nurses, who have worked on a med/surg floor before, like working in the CCU/CVICU better? If so, why do you like it better. Is having 1-2 really sick patients sometimes less stressful than having 6-7 regular patients? (This many pt.s kills me sometimes, but I understand that the pt.s in CCU are sicker so maybe it evens out...I don't know). I did rotations in the CCU and CVICU during clinical and I liked them both a lot, but I know its different when you're the actual nurse. Also, have any of you nurses been really nervous to go into work (even when you worked on a med/surg floor?) and overcome that to love working in a critical care setting? Just needing some info from other nurses. Thanks!


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