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short1978 2,346 Views

Joined Oct 12, '08. Posts: 96 (15% Liked) Likes: 14

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  • Apr 8 '09

    Quote from short1978
    Lindarn,
    Yeah I actually work at Holy Family. It was a few wks ago when they did the freeze. A coworker's brother works at Kootenai and said Monday night at work that they are doing the same now.
    Did you have a chance to talk to the other hospitals? They were all hell bent on hiring when I went to the Job Fair last month. There is another was another job fair today at the convention center. I know that the Sherrif's Department has been trying to hire an RN forever, and can't seem to get anyone interested. It is a great state job. You could try there. Hope this helps.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington

  • Feb 25 '09

    Look BON of each state sometimes you can pay to put a hold on your license.

  • Feb 25 '09

    Don't know about putting a hold on a license but I do hold licenses in two states without a problem from either one.

  • Feb 1 '09

    Quote from short1978

    youknowho: Are you saying take another job and still try for the OB slot or pass on the residency program all together?

    Thanks..
    My 2 cents would be to take another job now. You have a job offer NOW instead of maybe a job offer later. Even if you get that later job offer it might still be in a different unit than the one you want. Good luck with your decision, I know its not an easy one.

  • Jan 31 '09

    Just interesting. I'm in a nearly identical situation in New England area. I'm in the RN Residency program and hoping to end up in Maternity, but again no guarantee. Out of 8 of us, 3 want maternity, so the competition is tough. I have an hour commute. It's just not what I had envisioned throughout nursing school. Let us know what you decide to do.

  • Jan 31 '09

    I would take the residency program slot if offered. Follow your muse and happiness follows. OB is what you really want to do.

    A 45 minute commute is doable. (I have a 70 minute commute.) You may find that the commute becomes a part of your day that you enjoy.

  • Jan 31 '09

    i actually did say something once.

    working night shift in the er, just my tech and me. no pts, doc's asleep, we're watching tv. about 0530 a man carries in his 7-yr-old son. he spent a good 10 minutes berating me (in english) about having to stand outside the er for 20 minutes before we opened the doors, which were kept locked at night for staff safety. i kept trying to ask him if he had rung the bell but never got an answer. finally he listened to the umpteenth time i asked him what was wrong with his son, and he asked for a spanish speaker. i told him my tech was busy at the moment (she really was) and that he was doing fine (spoke broken english but i understood him). he exploded and started yelling at me in spanish, and finally he yelled in english, "why don't you speak spanish??"

    that pushed me over the edge, and without thinking i shot back, "why don't you speak english??"

  • Jan 31 '09

    I would avoid the ones you will be alone at, and the home health ones. The options at the hospital, where you have people around, seem best, to me anyway.

    From you choices, GYN seems to lead into OB better than the rest of them. If OB is your long term goal, GYN seems like the best short term goal.

    I have a personal interest in oncology, that'd be what I took. But I dont want to get into OB so I'm different.

  • Jan 28 '09

    Can you do the HH thing until the residency at the hospital becomes available? I say go for what your gut says. If it's telling you L&D, then try for it. You'll be playing the what if game if not.

    GOOD LUCK!!!!!!

  • Jan 28 '09

    Try to take a position where there are a lot of experienced people that can guide you. Believe me you will need advice from time to time.

  • Nov 21 '08

    I am surprised that a staffing agency would hire a new grad. They usually want someone with at least a year or two of experience. From what I have expected in the past when i did use agency, if I had a agency nurse come into my facility I expected her to be able to walk into the building and pull her own weight and do everything an employee would do. THe only orientation received would be a 15 minute explanation of emergency policies and small tour of where things are.

  • Nov 21 '08

    I agree. It is completely inappropriate for an agency to hire a new grad and throw them into a situation where patients and YOUR license are at risk. The agency doesn't have as much to lose as you do. You need a job where you can be trained and taught by experienced nurses. Work in one setting for 1-2 years prior to taking on agency work.

  • Nov 21 '08

    Here's my 2 cents: I was offered the same job working agency as a new grad in LTC a few years ago. I was unsure about taking it and instead took a full time job in LTC. It was right for me. I was too unsure to be good as an agency nurse right out of school.

    I have worked all three shifts and they differ somewhat. Day shift is hectic because you have 2 meals, PT, visitors and a big morning med pass. The upside is that shift is better staffed and you will have more support. My noon and afternoon med pass were not bad. In my LTC I had to help with feeding and be in the dining room for 1 1/2 hours a shift to help and make sure no one choked or started fights. If you don't work there all the time this will put you behind. Most treatments/wound care will be done on this shift.

    Evening shift will leave you with many dr orders to take off, less support & staffing, and a big nighttime med pass. This shift also has sundowning which I found hard to handle at first. But it did calm down at night. I almost never stayed late which was unheard of on day shift.

    Night shift will give you chart checks (checking to make sure Dr orders were written correctly) MAR recaps (monthly changes) and a big AM med pass when you are the most tired LOL. If you have an AM emergency this will KILL your med pass and you won't get out of there on time and the day shift will want to hurt you!

    The Good about working as an agency nurse is you get a feel for the facility and MANY of our nurses were agency nurses who applied for jobs because they liked our place. Also, you tend to see the same agency nurses so it is likely you will keep returning to the same places and become familiar with the residents.

    Good luck whatever you choose!

  • Nov 21 '08

    IMHO, don't do it. I too was a new grad with a regular job and looking to do some temp work. I got sent to the LTC where I did my clinicals and felt so confident and excited. In my IGNORANCE I agreed to do a 16 hr shift! Boy what a mess I made! Yes, I was comfortable with all the pts, but not all the pts AT THE SAME TIME! In clincals we had 12 pts. When I worked I had 40 pts! My skills were OK, but of course they were OK with an instructor to run too, or at least another student nearby to ask. There was a TON of stuff that I had never done that had to be handled. Treatments I did not know anything about. Meds I had never heard of. Plus, I had NO confidence with calling for orders, or dealing with families. Honestly, I even told one pt "I'll go find your nurse." I walked out of the room and realized DUH?! :uhoh21: I AM THEIR NURSE!

    By the end of the night, the charge was attached at my hip. She gave me a firm (at first rude) tongue lashing for my ineptitude. Once she realized I had just graduated she lightend up, but still told me NO ONE should do temp work w/o a year work experience. SHE WAS RIGHT! No need to jeapordize you LICENSE for a few extra bucks. Find a regular ft/pt job and learn, learn, learn!

    luv,
    newgradwhowonttempagaintilloneyearisover....

  • Nov 21 '08

    Quote from noc4senuf
    I am surprised that a staffing agency would hire a new grad. They usually want someone with at least a year or two of experience. From what I have expected in the past when i did use agency, if I had a agency nurse come into my facility I expected her to be able to walk into the building and pull her own weight and do everything an employee would do. THe only orientation received would be a 15 minute explanation of emergency policies and small tour of where things are.
    I totally agree.

    Facilities expect agency nurses to hit the ground running.

    I really do not think agency is a good idea at all for a new grad.


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