Content That dianabay Likes

Content That dianabay Likes

dianabay 2,481 Views

Joined Jun 21, '08. Posts: 82 (39% Liked) Likes: 61

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  • Aug 25 '09

    Quote from CRNA2007
    In one breath you manage to deamonize nurses for wanting to protect their salaries and in the next claiming how great it is that the CNA has increased nursing salaries. Why is everything management or corporate a conspiracy theory with a lot of nurses on this board? The "out to get me" paranoia on the board is amazing.
    I'm not demonizing anyone for anything!
    I merely point out that being concerned only with your self interest does nothing to address the global concern over patient care.
    As to the comments regarding AONE and ANA, history indicts them.
    PS- It took several breaths

  • Aug 25 '09

    I would think that with universal healthcare that would mean more work available to the nurses since more people are seeking medical treatment. However, if they have accessible preventative care then they lessen their chances of getting to a critical stage in their health where the nurse would definatley be needed, lightening the load some. Maybe there could be a change in job openings, but I don't really see why the salary would change. The employer pays in proportion to how much he is paid, right? Correct me if I'm wrong, which I may be with some employers. But if they are definately getting paid by the government and accountable insurance companies, then they should be able to pass the wealth along vs. not geting anything my the uninsured and having to make up for it some way to get a balance.

    If I repeated anything, I'm sorry. I don't feel like reviewing 620+ posts.

  • Aug 24 '09

    Is this what we are here for??? To protect our salaries?
    As nurses, we have failed to live up to our responsibility to protect our patients. We have been sold out by our nursing "leadership", who are more concerned with protecting the hospital industry and their perception of some kind of executive and elitist status.
    We have been sold out by a for profit healthcare system which continues to make exorbitant profits off of our labor.
    We have been sold out by the ANA, which, for all its rhetoric, has failed to work to empower nurses to live up to our ethical obligations as outlined in the ANA Code of Ethics.
    The arguments for personal responsibility might make a little sense if we had a level playing field, which we do not.
    The hospital industry would replace us at the bedside in a heartbeat if they could, and they continue to try their best to work towards that end. Is that what you went into nursing for? To stand around with a clipboard while unliscensed people carried out the "menial" tasks of direct patient care.
    I went into healthcare 35 years ago to take care of patients, period. I can't do my job when I have 8, 9, 10 or more patients assigned to me.
    So what can WE, as nurses, do about all this? Take back our profession and become the true patient advocates we were intended to be.
    The revolution in California has given us a glimmer of hope to do this. And no, I do not practice in California, nor do I work for them. But I have been following this and see the potential.
    Join the National Nurse Organizing Committee today! It costs $30 PER YEAR to do this, and will help them, and us, to finally begin to protect ourselves, and more importantly, our patients. We can not possibly hope to take on the industry without organizing ourselves into a coherent political and social force.
    The CNA has managed to pass staffing legislation.
    Salaries have gone up dramatically.
    They have the best labor contracts in the nation, including things like retirement benefits.
    $30 per year seems like an awfully small amount to begin this process.
    Talk to your colleagues and get them to join.
    CNA/NNOC is the ONLY nursing organization growing in both numbers and political strength.

    It's time for us, as professional nurses, to actualize ourselves.
    We can't do it as individuals, but together, we can move mountains. There are 2.7 million of us.
    Let's marginalize these traitors in the AONE. Let's bring the ANA back to what it is supposed to be or get rid of them too.
    Try it, you might like what happens.

  • Aug 24 '09

    Quote from GCTMT
    It's about $1100 or more. It's expensive if you don't have money to pay your bills.
    MY son was born with HLHS. Our insurance company terminated his coverage following his first surgery. It was recommended we get divorced so that I could have him covered by Medicaid.
    We did not get divorced and it has been tough for us as we would not 'play the system' as many people do. It is terrible that people are forced into situations that they never imagined they would be in. Over the past 2 years we have been burdened with a massive amount of debt. We need to consider bankruptcy now. But sadly our son will need a heart transplant in the future, and that will be expensive. I am not only talking about the medical cost, but also the food, gas, room to stay, etc, and not to mention the fact that one or both parents may have to take unpaid time off work.

    It is not as simple as CRNA2007 seems to think it is.

  • Aug 24 '09

    You go girls it is so inspiring to hear other nurses more seasoned than I who appear to be able to critically think be devalued by their employer!! It has been my experience that most employers really only want followers, willing to follow the script and be overjoyed while doing it!!!
    Canadians health system has it's weak points, but is such a far cry better than the arrogant egotistical system we have in the States. I would like to ask some one who was at a 6+ figure income and now after this "economic downturn" is on state assistance aka (welfare) if they would value a system like Canada's??!!!! In my life time I have been both on the top and on the bottom, health care for all needs to be every ones responsibility!!!
    Thank you for sharing your experience w/ us!

  • Aug 22 '09

    Quote from cxg174
    I am fine now, thank God it was an endocrine problem and not the tumor they suspected, but it opened my eyes to the plight of the uninured. Thanks for asking.
    I am sorry that I did not ask I replied to noly one person. I am really glad you are OK. It is scary.

  • Aug 22 '09

    I am fine now, thank God it was an endocrine problem and not the tumor they suspected, but it opened my eyes to the plight of the uninured. Thanks for asking.

  • Aug 16 '09

    thanks a lot, linzz. we really appreciate it.

    this was posted on our union's secure site (i've edited to protect the poster):

    [font=geneva][font=geneva]we are a small rural hospital out in xxxxx, and we have been told that due to rn and lpn shortage, they are going to replace our acute care rn with a une to cover shifts left vacant (due to holidays and shortness). we only staff this area with one rn, one lpn, and one na for 14 acute care patients, 1 palliative care bed and there is one rn only in emerg to cover that area. we have been told that the rn in emerg would be "responsible" for overseeing everything the une does. we have to double check everything they do - narcotics, insulins, etc, and they can't hang blood, iv bags, iv meds, etc. i understand the une can't be in charge of the floor or hold narcotic keys, but in case emerg is busy - which it usually is (lots of refineries and big construction companies in our area), how is one rn expected to cover both areas and be responsible for an area that she might not see very much of?

    if anyone else has une's working on their floors, can you please pass some direciton my way as how i can handle this? several of the rn's have refused to work in emerg if a une is on the floor, because they feel the safety of the patients and themselves is jeopardized. we feel that we are being backed into a corner with this, and it has left alot of rn's upset and frustrated to the point that some are willing to resign/retire. we can't afford to lose any more staff! our overtime is through the roof and morale is in the toilet!

    another nurse wrote this:

    [font=geneva][font=geneva]on my unit we have 2 unes working with us who have not been adequately supervised. the one student requested more buddy shifts in addition to his 7 stating that on some of his buddy shifts he was just alloted his supervising nurse's patients and left on his own. i ordered extra staff for the next shift so he could be buddied, but our unit clerk made the decision that he didn't need any more buddy shifts and cancelled the extra staff i had requested. as it turned out, the une gave a patient a prn in 2 hours when it was ordered as q6h. our other une processed a med order for 1200 mg of lithium but transposed it into the mar of the wrong patient. luckily, that error was caught and the wrong patient did not get the wrong med. i spoke with my manager regarding the first une's request for more buddy shifts, and her response was that we "must" provide him with extra buddy shifts. in nursing school students are often made to feel that they are supposed to know everything before they even step foot on a unit, and are often afraid of asking for help and support for fear of being viewed as incompetent. however, in situations where units are short staffed and are unable to supervise unes adequately, they should refrain from hiring them as patient safety is obviously compromised as a result.

    the responses these posts attracted revealed that not only rural hospitals were resorting to this but some urban ones had been "managing" the same way. to be honest, i've worked with some very intelligent and experienced nursing assistants that i'd be more comfortable delegating to than some of the graduate nurses i've known. i'd be filling out professional responsibility forms and calling the college if i had to let someone who was only part way through their education take responsibility for my patients.

  • Aug 16 '09

    Quote from janfrn
    This is where comparing educational programming and licensing requirements becomes a bit of a quagmire. Every province is going to do things their own way. Perhaps it might be useful to preface remarks in these sorts of threads by stating where you're from first off so the person looking for information doesn't become overwhelmed and confused by the grab bag of responses.

    Just as a comment on Fiona's description of what is currently happening in Alberta as relates to the Undergraduate Nurse Employees... Because Alberta Health Services has decided there is no nursing shortage in Alberta and therefore there will be no new hires, only a redistribution of existing health human resources, many wards in the province are significantly short staffed. At major urban hospitals there will always be at least an RN or LPN to supervise the UNE, (which is why the regular staff are not being offered the extra shifts or are being sent home... they cost a LOT more) but in rural areas and even the suburban community hospitals UNEs are replacing the licensed personnel and working without supervision. This is a disaster waiting to happen. Kaaren Neufeld, the president of the Canadian Nurses' Association has publicly chastised the minister of health for this misdistribution of health care human resources. Not that he's likely to care what "some woman in Ottawa who's just a nurse" has to say.

    To all of you in Alberta, I am in solidarity with you. Not that Ontario is doing such a great job managing their resources.

  • Aug 16 '09

    Quote from Purple_Scrubs
    I think the focus should be on the children who are innocents in the situation. There needs to be some research done on what is in the child's best interest. Perhaps it is more traumatic to be taken away at a year of age, as mentioned above. Perhaps it is better that the child not bond closely, especially if the mother is to be incarcerated for any length of the child's life.

    As far as the mother, they deserve no more or less than any other inmate or patient. To be treated with respect and be provided with the highest possible level of care.
    I agree completely. If the mother is not going to be there for the child as he/she grows up, then it would probably be best for the child to bond with the family who will raise him/her. To force the baby to bond with someone who is not going to be there and to not have a chance to bond with the family who will give him/her a home is probably cruel to the child.

    Now ... if the mom is only going to be in jail for a short time and will have custody after her release, then that's another story.

    I believe the best interest of the child (determined on a case-by-case basis) should be an important consideration.

  • Aug 16 '09

    I am a nursing administrator at a women's correctional facility. While I feel sorry for the children, I have far less sympathy for the offender. Whatever her feelings for her unborn child, it wasn't enough to prevent her from committing a crime. It would be beneficial to the child to have time to bond, but this is not practical in a prison environment. The mother is deprived of many of the experiences of childbirth and bonding with the infant, but it is of her own doing. Many of these women have committed significant crimes, and I do not believe that preganancy should mitigate the punishment they receive for committing them. Separation from society, including family, is often the consequence for committing felonies.

    Our caseworkers and social worker work closely with pregnant inmates on placement of infants after birth. Some are put up for adoption, while others are turned over to other caregivers (usually family members). Thorough background checks are performed on the person or persons who will take custody of the infant and the home situation is investigated, to ensure that to the best of our knowledge the baby is not being placed in a dangerous environment or placed with people who are unable to provide proper care.

    I saw a show on MSNBC about some penitentiaries that have mother/baby units and programs where mothers are housed in secure, baby friendly units and are allowed to keep their babies for one year. I think that's an awesome program and should be more widely promoted so that other institutions can follow suit. (JMHO).
    This was considered in my state, and it was discarded due to the tremendous cost. Specially trained staff would have to be hired to work 24-7, a new facility would have to be built, and it would have to be licensed as a day care center, subject to rigid standards that would be very difficult to meet while maintaining necessary security procedures. There is also the possibility of one mother becoming angry with another and deliberately injuring her baby (after all, people aren't sent to prison for being mature or exercising appropriate judgment). Another consideration is that it would take about 15 minutes for the first lawsuit to be filed by a male offender asserting that his rights as a father were just as important.

    The simple solution for pregnant mothers is, don't commit a crime.

  • Aug 16 '09

    I think the focus should be on the children who are innocents in the situation. There needs to be some research done on what is in the child's best interest. Perhaps it is more traumatic to be taken away at a year of age, as mentioned above. Perhaps it is better that the child not bond closely, especially if the mother is to be incarcerated for any length of the child's life.

    As far as the mother, they deserve no more or less than any other inmate or patient. To be treated with respect and be provided with the highest possible level of care.

  • Aug 16 '09

    I feel sorry for the kids, having the misfortune to be born to mothers who, at the very least, have made some v. poor choices and shown some v. poor judgment in order to wind up in this situation. The kids certainly didn't ask for this, and are starting life with several big strikes against them.

  • Aug 16 '09

    A woman is a woman and childbirth for any woman should be special, spiritual, and unique. No two deliveries are ever the same, even for the same woman, and so the experience should be treated as such. She should not be in shackles, her baby should not be ripped away, and she should not be made to feel like less than a laboring mother, (much less a downright criminal) for the precious moments when she is communing with God in bringing another life into the world. I think it is important for mother and baby to have an extended bonding period before the child is placed in foster care as long as the environment is conducive to raising a child happily and healthily for a few months. I saw a show on MSNBC about some penitentiaries that have mother/baby units and programs where mothers are housed in secure, baby friendly units and are allowed to keep their babies for one year. I think that's an awesome program and should be more widely promoted so that other institutions can follow suit. (JMHO).

  • Aug 14 '09

    Quote from PumaAngel
    This reminds me of something that happened to me not that long ago. I had a patient who was extremely confused and flipped back and forth between being the sweetest little lady and an aggressive and extremely abusive patient. She had a sitter and the sitter came to me during one of the few times she was sleeping quietly and told me all about the horrible nurse the patient had the night before. She told me how that nurse had yelled at her and tied her down and caused horrible bruises on her body by pinching and hitting her. The sitter asked me what I was going to do about it and I just had to laugh. I said nothing because I was her nurse last night and not one of those things happened. She had actually had a quiet night that night and blessedly slept through most of it. If a patient has a sitter, chances are they are confused. This lady took turns hating you one minute and loving you the next the whole time she was on the floor. If those things seemed real in the patient's mind, there is not a thing we can do about that. Just remember to get the facts before you start running to people with accusations or reporting your coworkers.
    OR... OR how about when you leave the room for 10 minutes and come back and the patient tells you a horror story about the "awful nurse" who was just in the room who did all this TERRIBLE stuff to them and you KNOW it isn't true... because they are talking about YOU???
    LMAO!!!
    And this same patient is praising you up and down as their savior because "you're sooo sweet! NOT like the other one!"
    Oh man, it's too funny!!
    And...
    I remember a good friend of mine who was a darn good male aide. I come in and this patient is going on and on and on about how this aide jumped up and down on her bed.........naked!!!!
    Shoooooot!!
    I told the aide if he was going to do that kinda junk, COME ON OVER to my apartment because I wanted to pop me some popcorn and watch that for myself!!!
    You can only laugh sometimes, otherwise, well, you'd cry!


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