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Content That mindy1982 Likes

mindy1982 1,689 Views

Joined Mar 6, '08. Posts: 14 (36% Liked) Likes: 12

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  • Aug 29 '14

    My mother used to be a scrub nurse in L&D back when most of the patients had the scopalamine "twilight sleep" treatment. This particular night I was the circulator(yes, we actually had TWO nurses for normal deliveries, not just c-sections ) The OB was a rather snotty, demanding man and he wanted his instruments to come fast. My mother anticipated his every move, right up to the point where she put her cord clamp in her mouth like she was holding a diaper pin. I got her a new cord clamp and she had to hold that "diaper pin" in her mouth for the rest of the delivery because she couldn't risk contaminating everything by spitting it out.

  • Aug 29 '14

    Quote from Jenni811
    I was working a night shift and a patient of ours was getting an art line placed. He was very very obese man. He had a very large pannus that i think hung to his knees. So the attending came in and was telling me "Dr. ____ is going to do the art line. this is his first one" (patient is sedated and on a vent so he didnt hear that). The dr. was just letting me know since "nurses know all"
    anyway...so in the room its me, the attending and the resident.
    The resident and the attending decided they wanted to do femoral. im sitting here thinking its not the best idea because of his very large panus (hard to keep clean, not to mention difficult to insert).
    So keep in mind that i'm very small, im 23 years old, 5'2 and 115 lbs. And these 2 doctors are both over 6 ft tall. So of course they adjust the bed to their height.

    I'm all gowned up, and there for when they need their tools or an extra hand. Then i see they are having difficulty getting it in because of his pannus. So i go over stick my arms under the sterile drape and hold his pannus back thinking it would be only a couple minutes. NOPE!!!!! it was 30 minutes later and im still holding this giant mans pannus, my back is killing me since im not in the best position and another 20 minutes go by and resident finally gets it in.

    The next day when i worked a night shift the Resident brought me some cookies for holding a giant pannus
    Oh wow, does this bring back a memorial event on clinicals! We had a student in our class who had recently come to the US from Russia. We had an obese patient with extensive ulcerations on his legs and abdomen. The Doc came in on rounds with his team to show them the ulcerations, and asked our Russian student to "hold up his pannus" so the team could evaluate the wounds. Without a moment of hesitation, our student groped UNDER the pannus, and proclaimed " I got it, Doctor!" Needless to say, she didn't have a hand on the patient's pannus, but the patient looked happy nonetheless! The look on the Doc's face was priceless!
    (However, as the nurse was fluent in 4 languages, our instructor did cut her some slack...)

  • Aug 29 '14

    Reminds me of a rescue call about twenty years ago... a car crash in which there was a bleeding patient. One of the other EMT's held out his hand toward one of the firefighters and asked for a "4x4". The firefighter, thinking in terms of stabilizing the vehicle, handed the EMT a 4x4" block of wood.

  • Aug 29 '14

    I had a patient say to me, "Oooohh, so you're a male nurse." I responded, "yeah, I wanted to be a female nurse, but I couldn't pass the physical examination." Couple other nurses in the hall way apparently heard this exchange since they erupted into laughter and when I exited the room one said that it was the funniest thing she'd ever heard and another said she nearly peed her pants.

  • Aug 29 '14

    when i was a new army medic and got to my my first duty station they sent me to the medical supply sgt's desk to get a box of chem light batteries and non-sticking tape...needless to say the joke was on me that day.

  • Aug 29 '14

    I was working a night shift and a patient of ours was getting an art line placed. He was very very obese man. He had a very large pannus that i think hung to his knees. So the attending came in and was telling me "Dr. ____ is going to do the art line. this is his first one" (patient is sedated and on a vent so he didnt hear that). The dr. was just letting me know since "nurses know all"
    anyway...so in the room its me, the attending and the resident.
    The resident and the attending decided they wanted to do femoral. im sitting here thinking its not the best idea because of his very large panus (hard to keep clean, not to mention difficult to insert).
    So keep in mind that i'm very small, im 23 years old, 5'2 and 115 lbs. And these 2 doctors are both over 6 ft tall. So of course they adjust the bed to their height.

    I'm all gowned up, and there for when they need their tools or an extra hand. Then i see they are having difficulty getting it in because of his pannus. So i go over stick my arms under the sterile drape and hold his pannus back thinking it would be only a couple minutes. NOPE!!!!! it was 30 minutes later and im still holding this giant mans pannus, my back is killing me since im not in the best position and another 20 minutes go by and resident finally gets it in.

    The next day when i worked a night shift the Resident brought me some cookies for holding a giant pannus

  • Aug 29 '14

    When I had my OR clincial, I was a brand new nursing student who knew nothing about a cholesystectomy. Well they asked me to exit the room while they did xray (i didnt have any lead) I came back and the belly was inflated (i had no idea they did this mind you) From my point of view in the corner, I assumed the patient was prone, because the inflated belly looked like a behind to me, I assumed they were extracting the gallballer rectally. When they were finishing up and the surgeon asked if I had any questions, I said why would you take it out rectally as opposed to through the belly? He started laughing and explained the inflation with the CO2....boy was I red!! Then he showed me the diseased gall bladder and told me that now its the nurses job to wash it out and then they put it back in the patient! I totally believed him until I had to explain the procedure to my entire class at post conference. I never lived it down.

  • Aug 29 '14

    My first semester of clinicals, we had a near-fall in the hallway. Someone yelled for a chair. I grabbed an office chair from the desk close by. Everyone thought I was an idiot, but the patient didn't fall.

  • May 4 '12
  • Nov 9 '11

    Very funny!

    Along those same lines, when I was first starting out in the OR, I was with a surgeon who was known to be quite the bear to work with. If the scrub nurse didn't anticipate what he needed and had it IN HAND, he would have a melt down. I was terrified to begin with when I first started in the OR, and the added stress of working with this surgeon just about loosened my bowels.

    During one particularly nasty belly case, I somehow weathered the storm with him and only got yelled at twice. What I DIDN'T know about this surgeon is that he has a healthy sense of humor and is actually a really sweet guy. Both proved to be true after I had gotten to know him, but he had to play a mean joke on me as my 'induction' into the grand halls of surgery.

    Things had settled down after the difficult phase of surgery and we were closing. All of a sudden, he yells at me, "Quick, get me the henway retractor! NOW! I said NOW! Get the HENWAY CANES!!!!" I was all thumbs as I frantically searched my table for an instrument that was unfamiliar to me, using the process of elimination to find this retractor. "CANES, I NEED THAT HENWAY RIGHT THIS INSTANT!" I replied, "If you tell me what it is, I will give it to you! What's a henway?" The staff start breaking up into laughter and the surgeon smiles, looks up at the ceiling as if in thought and said, "Oh, I dunno. I s'ppose a hen weighs 'bout 8 pounds or so."

  • Jul 26 '08

    Quote from Dolce
    One place I worked at page Dr. Pittauque overhead as the "JCAHO is in the building" code. We didn't have a Dr. Pittauque at that hospital. I always thought to myself, if your not ready by the time they show up you are just not going to be ready....

    They could at least page a fun name, like Doctor Whoopee or something

  • Jul 26 '08

    BTW, JCAHO is famous for asking staff to show them locations of policies and the like; I think it would be hilarious if they asked to be shown the emergency code policy and the definition of what constitutes a 'Code J'.

  • Jul 26 '08

    A nurse named Florence Nightengale, worked in a hospital where tuberculosis ran rampant. Nothing the medical professionals did solved the excalating number of deaths, until Florence Nightengale thought; "Nothing else is working, so I'm going to open these windows." That amazing feat decreased the number of deaths by numbers. When the government and the organizations that operated hospitals at that time, saw what was happening, more and more sanitariums were built, and, with rest and fresh air along with medication was eventually eradicated.

    Mankind has fought plagues, diseases, and injuries since time began. Throughout time, improvements continued via medical science until modern day. We now have specialists in all fields of medicine, including research and trials to test disease improvement through various methods like surgery, invention of newer high tech devices, robots, scopes, miracle medications, transplants, etc.

    To become specialists in their chosen fields, numerous nurses have become CRNAs (certified registered nurse anesthesists), nurses who teach others to become nurses called nurse educators anywhere from a RN,MSN,ED to a RN, MSN, PHD, ED. CNAs LPNs RNs BSNs, etc.

    There are now specialties in all fields, including emergency nursing, pediatric nursing, geriatric nursing, operating room nursing, emergency room nurses, flight nurses, neonatal nurses with specialties in care for the very ill premature babies which are increasing in the United States.There are also wound care nurses, med nurses, legal nurse specialists, hospice nurses, homecare nursing, certified nursing assistants, nurses in administration, nurse managers, etc. Yes, this is indeed a time when nursing can be a wonderful career, given the many choices there are today.

    There is an ongoing problem however, and it has lasted as long as I have been in the healthcare field (I'm a senior citizen) and longer.That problem is what I will call one upmanship. One upmanship is a term the CNA, LPN, RN, MSN, PHD all people in the field of nursing with varying degrees who tell other nurses they have more education, so they deserve better, or she has been at the place longer so she has more seniority, nurses eating nurses, backbiting, lying, etc, just to make oneself feel better, or so he/she thinks.It's unfortunate this is still an ongoing thing.

    When we went into nursing, our goals were, or should have been to create a care plan that would bring our patients to homeostasis, a term we use to assist the individual, and his/her family members to health, or a peaceful death. In order to do this, the care plan consists of a nursing diagnosis and treatment of human responses to actual or potential health problems. The nurse needs to get and chart results of ordered tests, administer ordered meds, and monitor the outcome of the patient.

    When I was an EMT, and a CPR instructor, I always took extra classes in order to learn more. One special class was about SIDS. In this case the parents blame themselves, feeling; "If only I had" when in fact there was nothing the parent could have done. So it's important to treat the parent, telling the parent what sometimes happens with SIDS, and it usually happens in the first year of the baby's life. There's an electrical impulse from the brain to the respiratory center and the SA node that hit the AV junction to the Bundle of His in the heart that keeps the baby alive. Sometimes, even if the infant is even laying on its back, this can happen. We call it a short circuit from the brain in order to better explain it to the family so they don't blame themselves.

    This is why when medical care, from the administration, to the physician, to the nurse manager, to the other nurses, and CNAs when working correctly, run like a well oiled machine, and people get well faster. Wouldn't it be nice if that would happen.

    I spoke with a nurse specialist once since I'm now disabled, but do keep up with my knowledge via on this website, and reading journals, that I didn't know if I was still able to keep my user name since it does define who I really am. She told me, the same thing I learned in nursing school. "Once a nurse always a nurse, and a nurse is a nurse is a nurse." I know that I love nursing, and if I was able to, I would still be working as one. I hold every one of them, from the student, to the CNA, to whatever position they may hold, may that even be LPN, RN, BSN, MSN, RN PHD in high esteem as long as they don't let their titles go to their heads, and try to down another medical person having the same goal of caring for an individual. That is why no matter how many Letters I had after my name, I would still choose to tell my patients and others as I have for many years now, "I'm a nurse."

  • Jul 26 '08

    Imagine

    You wake up slowly, open your eyes and……where am I? Four white walls, white door, brown door…….This is not my bedroom; where is the chest of drawers inherited from granny, my pictures, ornaments and the yellow wallpaper? Where am I, where are the boys, it’s light, I must find……what?! My boys where are my boys?

    You get out of bed, unsteady, dizzy…where am I? How do I get out…must get out, this door that door?…..Long dim corridor full of brown doors, where are the, where are they?! Someone coming, someone in white, more white…..talking at me. What is she saying? I don’t understand…where are my boys? “Go back to bed!”. But I must find them, must find them…. “It’s only five o’clock in the morning, go back to bed!”….but where are they ,must find them. Hands on my arm, pulling me….no, no I must find them, where are my boys? Let me go…who are you, let me go. You push the figure in white away, frightened. She has stopping you from finding..…them. “She’s being aggressive again”…who is she talking about…..me? Another figure, blue this time. “What’s wrong, Mary”? She talks to me not at me. I understand her. She does not shout or pull at me.

    My boys, where are my boys. “They are at home asleep”, she says…but where am I …where am I… “You stay with us now, Mary, remember, you’ve been here a while. Your boys know where you are. They will be in to see you later. Mary it’s only 5 o’clock in the morning. Let’s go back to bed, eh?” Back along that corridor….all doors, more doors. Into a room, white walls, white doors. "Do you need to go to the toilet Mary?" What, what… “Sit here, Mary, on the toilet”. Toilet,toilet…oh yes that’s what I want….Tired, need to sleep....boys later, later…….

    Imagine how it feels, confused, alone, lost in your own head, in the big noisy world of a Nursing Home. Long corridors of doors each one looking exactly the same as the last one you passed. When those doors are open there is a cacophony of noise emanating from each one with each individual room resident having their own individual tastes in TV, radio or DVD’s all played at high volume. Staff rush at you speaking so quickly that the confused mind just cannot process the information quickly and therefore become more confused when confronted by time-pressed ,overstretched staff who want to do their best for the resident but are always fighting a losing battle with the clock and the limited resources with which they work. This is were confusion can turn to aggression because we simply do not give enough time for their brain’s to process the information and act upon it. They are not being obstructive on purpose, they just cannot understand at the pace at which we are going.

    Imagine losing the ability to recognise not only your nearest and dearest but the simple everyday things of life such as the toilet, the way to your room and back again, the use of cutlery and even the fact that you have to eat at all. Imagine being told something and just simply not remembering it seconds later (and yes, we all have our ‘senior moments’!), but being able to remember 40 -50 years before with a startling clarity that brings tears to the eyes of those lucky enough to hear the tales of yester year and bring a poor, demented soul to life as they were before they succumbed to the living Hell commonly know as dementia.

    In our fast and often frantic working environments we often forget to slow down the pace for our elderly residents. In a quiet minute try imagining what it is like in their shoes. It is confusing and lonely and scary. We are the ones who can make it different for them; we are the ones who must care.



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