Latest Likes For ®Nurse

Latest Likes For ®Nurse

®Nurse, MSN, RN 9,485 Views

Joined Feb 26, '08. Posts: 1,123 (63% Liked) Likes: 2,870

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  • 12:43 am

    I certainly don't mind a scenario where I could just come in and get paid a lot of money to help with ADL's.
    The problem always lies within the fact that you cannot Un-Know what you Know.

    It has always been difficult for me to just do the CNA duties. I always wound up working my buns off because if I saw an issue, and the other nurse could not, or would not, address it, I was ethically bound to take care of it.

    Pain issues, wounds, treatments..... Couldn't just say "I'm in the CNA slot today; Not my circus, not my monkeys".

    If the Nurse could be free to just do ADL's, and leave it at that, my goodness, I would take that assignment!

  • May 27

    I certainly don't mind a scenario where I could just come in and get paid a lot of money to help with ADL's.
    The problem always lies within the fact that you cannot Un-Know what you Know.

    It has always been difficult for me to just do the CNA duties. I always wound up working my buns off because if I saw an issue, and the other nurse could not, or would not, address it, I was ethically bound to take care of it.

    Pain issues, wounds, treatments..... Couldn't just say "I'm in the CNA slot today; Not my circus, not my monkeys".

    If the Nurse could be free to just do ADL's, and leave it at that, my goodness, I would take that assignment!

  • May 27

    I certainly don't mind a scenario where I could just come in and get paid a lot of money to help with ADL's.
    The problem always lies within the fact that you cannot Un-Know what you Know.

    It has always been difficult for me to just do the CNA duties. I always wound up working my buns off because if I saw an issue, and the other nurse could not, or would not, address it, I was ethically bound to take care of it.

    Pain issues, wounds, treatments..... Couldn't just say "I'm in the CNA slot today; Not my circus, not my monkeys".

    If the Nurse could be free to just do ADL's, and leave it at that, my goodness, I would take that assignment!

  • May 27

    Quote from Jrod85
    I'm the insensitive husband. My wife is a nurse that works in the float pool. She spends a lot time working in behavioral health and the medical floors.

    She has been working 3-4 16 hour shifts per 2 week pay period lately.

    She feels that since she is working 16 hour shifts, and a nurse that I should be more appreciative.

    I see things different than her. I wish I could 16 hour shifts and have more days off. I will 4 days off to her 8-9 days off per pay period. I work 80 hours per pay period and she works 60-70 hours. I wish I could do that.

    She will also explain to me how hard nursing is. In my mind, that is what she enjoys and is good at. Most of her issues with being a nurse is dealing with other nurses. It has nothing to do with the work itself.

    I basically came her to see if I could get a better understanding of how she feels. To hear from other nurses that have done the same thing and how their spouses were.

    Please don't hold back. I want your real thoughts. If I mad you mad, then tell me.
    Here is a better understanding of how I would feel if I were in her shoes: “Do you want a little cheese with that w(h)ine?

    For Christ sake, you’re trying to have a contest with your spouse? Over work hours? Over who works harder?

    Did you not get enough affirmation of your point of view when you discussed this with her? Didn’t she TELL you what her work was like? Did you think I would know what her work is like?!?

    Did you think that you were going to come here and get ammo for the next time you compared your pity party to hers?

    Not falling for that one.

    Do yourself a favor - go in to the bathroom, look at yourself in the mirror, and tell the person looking back at you that you’re going to begin with a fresh perspective tomorrow. The perspective of both of you being on the same team. Quit having a contest.

  • May 27

    I just stumbled across this post and thought to myself; "I would copy that sign, 'X' out the reference to 'Physicians', and insert the word 'Nurses'. I would then paste on every employee bathroom in the facility, just to make a point. (.....and I would include a tag line that says "Nurses need safe-havens too".

  • May 25

    Here on the Western side of the US, the only time I've ever noted that a physician inserted an NGT or an OGT, is if it was placed during surgery.

    It is within the nursing scope of practice to insert and remove NG/OGT.

    EBP supports confirming placement via CXR, and daily placement checks by pH monitoring.

  • May 23

    Quote from Cola89
    Nice... way to mock nurses who really dont have time to pee. Are you in management?
    Well.....his call-sign IS "boss man".

  • May 22

    Quote from Cola89
    Nice... way to mock nurses who really dont have time to pee. Are you in management?
    Well.....his call-sign IS "boss man".

  • May 22

    Quote from nursemeanie
    I have a group of students this semester who are really challenging. I've never had such a difficult group. I laid out my expectations at the beginning of the semester and every day at preconference we discuss the goals for the day. However, I still end up with groups of them congregating at the nurses station needing redirection. Often they haven't met the goals for the day and are just chatting. Other instructors tell me it's not me, this group is just particularly challenging. I'm not a newbie instructor, just really frustrated and feeling ineffective at this point. Anybody have words of wisdom?
    Who is the ‘group leader’? Watch the group dynamics of your students to see who does a lot of the “suggesting”, and you may very well have your solution when you are able to provide direction to that student.

  • May 22

    I am full time faculty in a nursing program, as well as working on the side at my ICU per-diem job to keep my skills current.

    I think it is absolutely fascinating that someone would require verbal/demonstrated praise on an expected basis in order to feel continued motivation. More fascinating, is that the withdrawal of such praise would cause demotivation. All this despite getting passing grades and passing clinicals.

    The nursing students here in the US at my college return high satisfaction scores with their current set up, and I can assure you, that when I do praise, it is for an action that is more than a baseline function of nursing duties. I’ve never had a student give me low marks.

    Is an ego so fragile, that motivation is largely buoyed by praise from without, rather than self talk and strong convictions to succeed from within?

    I can praise you all day long, but if you harm a patient, that’s pretty much the end of your progression through the program; Please do not confuse the roles of nursing faculty with the cheerleaders on the sports teams.

    Be aware that the absence of corrective language should speak volumes to an observant person. If you are not getting counseled on errors, that is a VERY good indication that you are doing well.

  • May 20

    This sounds like a perfect research into current Evidence Based Practice for gastric tube flush medium.



    A site like EBSCO, CINAHL, PubMed, etc., would be a great place to start.

    Typically, it takes over a decade for current EBP to be incorporated into practice.
    Be a leader, and find out from a few high level-of-evidence articles what the standard should be.

  • May 15

    I was an LPN for 15 years before I became an ADN RN. Not one single place, to this day, ever gave me credit for that 15 years experience.

    I really wanted to work ICU. I was burned out on M/S, however, I was seen as not having had any prior experience.

    I even got put into a "new grad" program for a year. It was a job and a paycheck. I figured if they wanted to pay me extra to teach me how to take a blood sugar and transfer someone out of a bed and into a wheelchair, there was a lot worse things that could happen to me.

    I applied for ICU, but there were no positions that were going to any new grads.

    So ~ I spent a ton of money on my own to learn as much about critical care as I could. I paid over $600 for a 7 week critical care training course. I paid for my own ACLS & PALS. I took a TNCC course. I took beginning, intermediate, and advanced hemodynamics. And so on, and so forth.

    When I finally got an interview for an ICU position, I was able to demonstrate that I had all the bells and whistles, and the facility didn't even have to pay to send me to training. I got hired and have worked in ICU ever since. (Now on-call).

    My area was saturated with nurses wanting to get into ICU. I barely stood a chance as an inexperienced RN without training.

    If you can get hired straight away ~ I say go for it. If not, then just "fake it till you make it"!
    (Get your own training)

  • May 15

    I gave you facts.
    I even said so in my posting. "In fact....."
    As nursing faculty/an educator, I have concerns that your approach brings to light. (That is an opinion).

  • May 13

    Dear Patient in MA,

    What an honor it must have been to be your nurse for even one shift. The "feels" that you weave in and out throughout your post are like lavender bath salts in a tub of deliciously warm water at the end of a long, grueling shift.

    Your reaction to your experience is the reason why nurses strive for those extra interventions that are more than medicine.

    Thank you for your insight, it's very touching.

    I hope you are finished with this difficult chapter of Crohns.

    Sincerely,

    [emoji768]Nurse

  • May 12

    I just stumbled across this post and thought to myself; "I would copy that sign, 'X' out the reference to 'Physicians', and insert the word 'Nurses'. I would then paste on every employee bathroom in the facility, just to make a point. (.....and I would include a tag line that says "Nurses need safe-havens too".


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