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ProfRN4, MSN 15,515 Views

Joined Apr 5, '03. ProfRN4 is a Staff Educator. She has '22' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Pediatrics'. Posts: 2,279 (22% Liked) Likes: 1,378

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  • Jan 19

    A behavior plan? Some sort of contract that rewards positive behavior and takes privileges away when she does throw things? If she is cognizant enough to know what she is doing is wrong, this should work (but I'm no psych nurse )

  • Jan 17

    Quote from Scott8273
    The friend + child: Well, if you must say something, I would write her privately and express your concern in a way that shows you respect her and her mothering, and the child seems so happy and well-adjusted, but did his doctor say anything cuz you're concerned. This would have to be done very carefully and craftily, or you will lose a friend and no one will benefit.

    As for CPS, IMO that's nuts. I have seen them rip families apart for a LOT less than overfeeding a child (which may even be happening because the child has a goofy metabolism, some condition, or God knows what else). To me, that's just a sad commentary on the state of our often hysterical society, and definitely not the route to go. But I could be wrong, of course.
    My thoughts exactly! About CPS and the approach to the mother.

    If it truly comes from a place of caring and concern, think long and hard about how you want to approach it. Or else, it will come across as 'shaming' (which, BTW, I can't stand that term. I feel like everyone thinks they are being 'shamed' when it is something they don't want to hear- I recently heard a teenager say to his mother "why are you shaming me" when she was just pointing out something she wanted him to do).

    Another thought, and question for the OP: do you have kids? I say this with peace and love <3. Because, before I had a child, I never imagined I'd have a kid who was anything but perfect and obedient. I will tell them what to eat, they will eat it (without argument) and they will be healthy, especially since I am a nurse! Fast forward a few (upper teen) years later, and I have a wonderful, beautiful, smart child who loves to eat! With that love of food comes mixed feelings about her body image, and with that comes feelings that I could have done more to prevent this. She is not obese, but she is not 'thin' either (overweight according to charts, but in today's world, does not stand out). I feel like it is harder when you have no experience in being overweight (I have never really struggled with weight). The show This Is Us has an episode about this (I HIGHLY recommend this show ). I am trying to continually reinforce the concepts of portion control, moderation and physical activity. I am a firm believer that restricting a child only forces them to want it more (I had two friends whose kids were like this: acted like fiends whenever given the chance; one was obese- mom tried hard (is a nurse, and was well aware) the other's kid was not (just more controlling, and will admit it.

    I am careful what I post on social media now, because I have been 'called out' by friends (my child never ate two adult meals of fast food, at age 5 nor present day... and the thought of that makes ME cringe too: no human being should consume that much in one sitting). After an innocent pic of her enjoying a sugary drink, or me ranting about how a fast food place forget my foot, and I drove back and ended up in a car accident, I am very careful.

    I also used to be a lot more preachy about safety (helmets, seatbelts/car seats and sitting in the front) and parenting styles (namely the horrors of helicopter parenting and coddling kids, and it's ill-effects when they get to college and the workforce). I stopped this, because I would literally get one or two likes; I was preaching to a crowd that didn't want to hear it.

    The bottom line is, no one really wants to hear these things from their 'friends', and there is usually no good way to tell someone they're 'doing it wrong', without them becoming defensive (especially when it comes to parenting).

  • Jan 16

    Hi. Not sure if I am talking to a student or a current faculty member (but my answer really shouldn't change), so here goes!

    I have seen it done three ways: No review at all, a group review immediately after the exam (under the same strict testing conditions- no writing, no getting up to get your phone/notes, not even a bathroom break before the review begins) and a one-on-one review by appointment (again, no pencils, phones, notes).

    The common denominator in all situations is security. Schools and faculty are paranoid about the exams leaking. When the school I taught in did not review at all, students complained that they didn't really know what the answer was (and no rationale for their wrong answers). So we went back to a very strict review. Bottom line; no difference in overall outcomes (statistics of how man passed/failed, did better on the final, etc).

    As an educator, I will say this: I hate reviews. They are incredibly stressful, emotional, students are scared, stressed, angry and some are downright nasty. While I understand the importance of the review (for the sake of the students' understanding of the questions/answers), I wish there was a way to make it for that, and not a fight for points.

  • Jan 14

    Quote from Scott8273
    The friend + child: Well, if you must say something, I would write her privately and express your concern in a way that shows you respect her and her mothering, and the child seems so happy and well-adjusted, but did his doctor say anything cuz you're concerned. This would have to be done very carefully and craftily, or you will lose a friend and no one will benefit.

    As for CPS, IMO that's nuts. I have seen them rip families apart for a LOT less than overfeeding a child (which may even be happening because the child has a goofy metabolism, some condition, or God knows what else). To me, that's just a sad commentary on the state of our often hysterical society, and definitely not the route to go. But I could be wrong, of course.
    My thoughts exactly! About CPS and the approach to the mother.

    If it truly comes from a place of caring and concern, think long and hard about how you want to approach it. Or else, it will come across as 'shaming' (which, BTW, I can't stand that term. I feel like everyone thinks they are being 'shamed' when it is something they don't want to hear- I recently heard a teenager say to his mother "why are you shaming me" when she was just pointing out something she wanted him to do).

    Another thought, and question for the OP: do you have kids? I say this with peace and love <3. Because, before I had a child, I never imagined I'd have a kid who was anything but perfect and obedient. I will tell them what to eat, they will eat it (without argument) and they will be healthy, especially since I am a nurse! Fast forward a few (upper teen) years later, and I have a wonderful, beautiful, smart child who loves to eat! With that love of food comes mixed feelings about her body image, and with that comes feelings that I could have done more to prevent this. She is not obese, but she is not 'thin' either (overweight according to charts, but in today's world, does not stand out). I feel like it is harder when you have no experience in being overweight (I have never really struggled with weight). The show This Is Us has an episode about this (I HIGHLY recommend this show ). I am trying to continually reinforce the concepts of portion control, moderation and physical activity. I am a firm believer that restricting a child only forces them to want it more (I had two friends whose kids were like this: acted like fiends whenever given the chance; one was obese- mom tried hard (is a nurse, and was well aware) the other's kid was not (just more controlling, and will admit it.

    I am careful what I post on social media now, because I have been 'called out' by friends (my child never ate two adult meals of fast food, at age 5 nor present day... and the thought of that makes ME cringe too: no human being should consume that much in one sitting). After an innocent pic of her enjoying a sugary drink, or me ranting about how a fast food place forget my foot, and I drove back and ended up in a car accident, I am very careful.

    I also used to be a lot more preachy about safety (helmets, seatbelts/car seats and sitting in the front) and parenting styles (namely the horrors of helicopter parenting and coddling kids, and it's ill-effects when they get to college and the workforce). I stopped this, because I would literally get one or two likes; I was preaching to a crowd that didn't want to hear it.

    The bottom line is, no one really wants to hear these things from their 'friends', and there is usually no good way to tell someone they're 'doing it wrong', without them becoming defensive (especially when it comes to parenting).

  • Jan 14

    Quote from Scott8273
    The friend + child: Well, if you must say something, I would write her privately and express your concern in a way that shows you respect her and her mothering, and the child seems so happy and well-adjusted, but did his doctor say anything cuz you're concerned. This would have to be done very carefully and craftily, or you will lose a friend and no one will benefit.

    As for CPS, IMO that's nuts. I have seen them rip families apart for a LOT less than overfeeding a child (which may even be happening because the child has a goofy metabolism, some condition, or God knows what else). To me, that's just a sad commentary on the state of our often hysterical society, and definitely not the route to go. But I could be wrong, of course.
    My thoughts exactly! About CPS and the approach to the mother.

    If it truly comes from a place of caring and concern, think long and hard about how you want to approach it. Or else, it will come across as 'shaming' (which, BTW, I can't stand that term. I feel like everyone thinks they are being 'shamed' when it is something they don't want to hear- I recently heard a teenager say to his mother "why are you shaming me" when she was just pointing out something she wanted him to do).

    Another thought, and question for the OP: do you have kids? I say this with peace and love <3. Because, before I had a child, I never imagined I'd have a kid who was anything but perfect and obedient. I will tell them what to eat, they will eat it (without argument) and they will be healthy, especially since I am a nurse! Fast forward a few (upper teen) years later, and I have a wonderful, beautiful, smart child who loves to eat! With that love of food comes mixed feelings about her body image, and with that comes feelings that I could have done more to prevent this. She is not obese, but she is not 'thin' either (overweight according to charts, but in today's world, does not stand out). I feel like it is harder when you have no experience in being overweight (I have never really struggled with weight). The show This Is Us has an episode about this (I HIGHLY recommend this show ). I am trying to continually reinforce the concepts of portion control, moderation and physical activity. I am a firm believer that restricting a child only forces them to want it more (I had two friends whose kids were like this: acted like fiends whenever given the chance; one was obese- mom tried hard (is a nurse, and was well aware) the other's kid was not (just more controlling, and will admit it.

    I am careful what I post on social media now, because I have been 'called out' by friends (my child never ate two adult meals of fast food, at age 5 nor present day... and the thought of that makes ME cringe too: no human being should consume that much in one sitting). After an innocent pic of her enjoying a sugary drink, or me ranting about how a fast food place forget my foot, and I drove back and ended up in a car accident, I am very careful.

    I also used to be a lot more preachy about safety (helmets, seatbelts/car seats and sitting in the front) and parenting styles (namely the horrors of helicopter parenting and coddling kids, and it's ill-effects when they get to college and the workforce). I stopped this, because I would literally get one or two likes; I was preaching to a crowd that didn't want to hear it.

    The bottom line is, no one really wants to hear these things from their 'friends', and there is usually no good way to tell someone they're 'doing it wrong', without them becoming defensive (especially when it comes to parenting).

  • Jan 13

    I will preface my reply with this: I am leaving my job in academia very shortly, so my answers may very well reflect this (note, it is a bittersweet transition for me, and I am nervous about it!)

    Salary: I cannot speak for Florida, but where I live and work, I make less than my new grads start out making Money is not everything, but it does make a huge impact on things (especially if you are taking a pay cut to do this). Before I started teaching, I was working a hybrid of per-diem and a part time job, making not quite what a full time nurse was making (while being a full time mommy and finishing up my masters), so it didn't hit me that hard in the beginning. Now, years later, I am realizing how much money I was sacrificing over the years.

    It is somewhat possible to work per diem, but it really depends on the demands of the program you teach in. Assuming you work in a college/university setting, you will have spring, summer and Chirstmas vacations, which should afford you the time to do so. But for me, it was hard to keep a per-diem commitment (because I couldn't balance any sort of work during the actual school year, and my per diem job had a minimum commitment).

    So yes, time off is a plus. I wouldn't say I was always home for my kids' drop offs and pick ups (early clinical hours did not allow for this). I've also had to roate to evening lectures (missing some evening school events). It's great to have Columbus day, labor day, and all those little (and Big- Christmas) holidays off. But the downside to teaching is, it is very hard to take a regular day off (your class/clinical needs to be covered, or made up if you have to cancel in an emergency). You can't ever go on vacation during a random week (it will always be when the rest of the world is on vaca). Obviously, flexibility is contingent upon your colleagues (if they can help you out in any way).

    Pro- no nights, weekends! You have more of a normal schedule.
    Con- you WILL bring work home. More than you think!

    Pro- You rarely stay late on the floor, because of work not getting done.
    Con- you have to ensure each student did what they were assigned to do (meds signed off, charting, signing off to RN, etc)

    Pro- many students are great! Eager to learn, excited when they make connections (you get as excited as they do), most are grateful of what you have to offer.
    Con- some are just not cut out to do this, and you know it, and it is difficult to quantify this on paper (without looking like you are 'out to get them'). It is heartbreaking sometimes, and you wish you can do more for them. But some just struggle, or cannot commit fully to their studies. Not so heartbreaking (more irritating/frustrating) are the ones who don't try, don't care, and are unprofessional. Late, unaccountable, poor paperwork, limited motivation. Some will test your limits. Cell phone usage, not respecting their classmates by listening to them in pre-post conferences, attempting to cut corners. These students represent a small percentage (depending on what program you teach in, and what course/level they are in), but there are enough to cause frustration.

    Pro-seeing their growth from week 1 to week 15
    Con- getting a brand new group and starting all over (it's like the movie Groundhog Day). In theory, I'd LOVE to follow a cohort from 1st nursing class to last, to see the true growth!

  • Jan 13

    Quote from Scott8273
    The friend + child: Well, if you must say something, I would write her privately and express your concern in a way that shows you respect her and her mothering, and the child seems so happy and well-adjusted, but did his doctor say anything cuz you're concerned. This would have to be done very carefully and craftily, or you will lose a friend and no one will benefit.

    As for CPS, IMO that's nuts. I have seen them rip families apart for a LOT less than overfeeding a child (which may even be happening because the child has a goofy metabolism, some condition, or God knows what else). To me, that's just a sad commentary on the state of our often hysterical society, and definitely not the route to go. But I could be wrong, of course.
    My thoughts exactly! About CPS and the approach to the mother.

    If it truly comes from a place of caring and concern, think long and hard about how you want to approach it. Or else, it will come across as 'shaming' (which, BTW, I can't stand that term. I feel like everyone thinks they are being 'shamed' when it is something they don't want to hear- I recently heard a teenager say to his mother "why are you shaming me" when she was just pointing out something she wanted him to do).

    Another thought, and question for the OP: do you have kids? I say this with peace and love <3. Because, before I had a child, I never imagined I'd have a kid who was anything but perfect and obedient. I will tell them what to eat, they will eat it (without argument) and they will be healthy, especially since I am a nurse! Fast forward a few (upper teen) years later, and I have a wonderful, beautiful, smart child who loves to eat! With that love of food comes mixed feelings about her body image, and with that comes feelings that I could have done more to prevent this. She is not obese, but she is not 'thin' either (overweight according to charts, but in today's world, does not stand out). I feel like it is harder when you have no experience in being overweight (I have never really struggled with weight). The show This Is Us has an episode about this (I HIGHLY recommend this show ). I am trying to continually reinforce the concepts of portion control, moderation and physical activity. I am a firm believer that restricting a child only forces them to want it more (I had two friends whose kids were like this: acted like fiends whenever given the chance; one was obese- mom tried hard (is a nurse, and was well aware) the other's kid was not (just more controlling, and will admit it.

    I am careful what I post on social media now, because I have been 'called out' by friends (my child never ate two adult meals of fast food, at age 5 nor present day... and the thought of that makes ME cringe too: no human being should consume that much in one sitting). After an innocent pic of her enjoying a sugary drink, or me ranting about how a fast food place forget my foot, and I drove back and ended up in a car accident, I am very careful.

    I also used to be a lot more preachy about safety (helmets, seatbelts/car seats and sitting in the front) and parenting styles (namely the horrors of helicopter parenting and coddling kids, and it's ill-effects when they get to college and the workforce). I stopped this, because I would literally get one or two likes; I was preaching to a crowd that didn't want to hear it.

    The bottom line is, no one really wants to hear these things from their 'friends', and there is usually no good way to tell someone they're 'doing it wrong', without them becoming defensive (especially when it comes to parenting).

  • Jan 10

    Quote from pookashellz
    and this is why i can't stand old people- they force us all to live in the past, instead of realizing that society progresses and updating their views. also, there should be NO judgment of others -for purple hair or anything else- when you can't even wipe your own ass; they should just be grateful they're being taken care of and ****.
    And this is why some old people can't stand young people.

  • Jan 4

    Quote from PARichards
    To those who work in online education, what experience are you looking for in applicants to instructor (or mentor or adjunct? so many distinctions!) positions in addition to a MSN in education? I feel like I will complete my program and not have a lot of teaching experience outside of the bedside to recommend me- makes me anxious!
    I do not have online teaching experience (as I am the OP, who was inquiring), but I would imagine they would want someone with some traditional experience, as a starting point for teaching. In my current job now, I am teaching a hybrid course (partially online, in a brick and mortar program). While this seems to be much more common in my region and university system, they will never truly go completely online (it is a traditional, community college ADN program). I have used many online tools in my courses thus far (for students to complete prior to class, as study tools, and as well as 'virtual conferences' . I feel like my current position has given me experience to venture into this field on a part time basis, and/or as a mentor. Mentoring is a constant part of my job, and I actually enjoy it!

    PARichards: we all started somewhere; many of us as adjuncts. I was fortunate enough to start as 'part time' in the school where I got my ADN (a classmate in my masters program was doing her practicum there, and she told me they were looking, so I put myself out there, and it paid off). Hopefully your practicum experience will lead to something more. I've also known a few nurses who made their start as adjuncts, per the recommendation of clinical instructors on their units. If you work in a specialty where students come for clinicals, speak to the instructor. If you are one of those nurses that he/she loves giving students to, they may steer you in the right direction (with a good word).

  • Jan 2

    I taught for 11 years. That's 22 different groups of students. I've seen quite the variety of cohorts: mature, driven, responsible, as well as immature, catty and lazy. In every group there were outliers.

    When I was a student, I was the youngest (started at 18), with a group of 20-50 year olds. Many were late 20s/early 30s. This was my group of friends/study partners. They were all 2nd career students, some with spouses, kids, mortgages and jobs. No time for drama (but yes, an occasional outing to the bar, where no one got kicked out).

    My my suggestion to you is to find a group of classmates that bring you up, not down. Like minded people, who are serious about this. People who will make the cut each semester.

  • Dec 28 '16

    I could have written this myself (except my students did not forget things in their dorm, as I taught at a commuter school). Well done. Especially the part about the other faculty members. I was a full time instructor, so I did know most of my colleagues pretty well (too well). Many of them I did not like/agree with, so the students' perceptions of us all ganging up and plotting to fail them were completely unfounded (I didn't feel that way, but sadly some of my colleagues did).

    I'll add this: the idea that professors/instructors do not know anything, but the staff nurse assigned to your patient (with one or two years experience) knows everything. While I do understand that there are instructors out there who are not current in clinical practice, do not paint broad strokes about all of us.

  • Dec 27 '16

    I taught for 11 years. That's 22 different groups of students. I've seen quite the variety of cohorts: mature, driven, responsible, as well as immature, catty and lazy. In every group there were outliers.

    When I was a student, I was the youngest (started at 18), with a group of 20-50 year olds. Many were late 20s/early 30s. This was my group of friends/study partners. They were all 2nd career students, some with spouses, kids, mortgages and jobs. No time for drama (but yes, an occasional outing to the bar, where no one got kicked out).

    My my suggestion to you is to find a group of classmates that bring you up, not down. Like minded people, who are serious about this. People who will make the cut each semester.

  • Dec 27 '16

    I taught for 11 years. That's 22 different groups of students. I've seen quite the variety of cohorts: mature, driven, responsible, as well as immature, catty and lazy. In every group there were outliers.

    When I was a student, I was the youngest (started at 18), with a group of 20-50 year olds. Many were late 20s/early 30s. This was my group of friends/study partners. They were all 2nd career students, some with spouses, kids, mortgages and jobs. No time for drama (but yes, an occasional outing to the bar, where no one got kicked out).

    My my suggestion to you is to find a group of classmates that bring you up, not down. Like minded people, who are serious about this. People who will make the cut each semester.

  • Dec 25 '16

    In theory, I see nothing wrong with knowing what you want. Yet, so many people have issues with that. When I taught, I was on the admissions committee, and I interviewed potential students. I would always ask them "what kind of nurse do you picture yourself becoming/where do you see yourself working?" I think it is a great motivation tool. I would also ask students who were failing/struggling that question. Again, motivation. People can (and often do) change their minds, things stand in our way, or experiences steer us away from certain specialties (or draw us more towards the specialty), or just lack of an offer can make us rethink our decision. And all of this is okay. BUT, I don't think it's fair to say that a person is being closed minded because they already know what they want to do. However, open minds yield more opportunities in the end. I've never been one to put all my eggs in one basket.


    My thoughts about this specific post, and the OP was "okay, it's her decision. If she doesn't get her dream job in the NICU right out of school, she'll do something else to pay the bills. Things happen for a reason, they don't always go the way we plan. It's really not our problem, or concern, right?


    And as an educator, I figured she'll do what she has to do to get through nursing school, and get through the 90-95% adult rotations (where I used to teach, my students had 4 peds days at best, and about the same (maybe 6) OB days (and no NICU, unless it was an observation day in either Peds or OB if the prof was willing to send you and the unit was willing to take you). I thought, clearly, she'll be professional enough, and understand the importance of it. Then I read this:

    Certainly why I dislike adults. They annoy the hell out of me and i will NEVER care for them as a RN. I would rather remain unemployed until I find a NICU job. ������
    Yikes. That's really all I can say.

  • Dec 25 '16

    In theory, I see nothing wrong with knowing what you want. Yet, so many people have issues with that. When I taught, I was on the admissions committee, and I interviewed potential students. I would always ask them "what kind of nurse do you picture yourself becoming/where do you see yourself working?" I think it is a great motivation tool. I would also ask students who were failing/struggling that question. Again, motivation. People can (and often do) change their minds, things stand in our way, or experiences steer us away from certain specialties (or draw us more towards the specialty), or just lack of an offer can make us rethink our decision. And all of this is okay. BUT, I don't think it's fair to say that a person is being closed minded because they already know what they want to do. However, open minds yield more opportunities in the end. I've never been one to put all my eggs in one basket.


    My thoughts about this specific post, and the OP was "okay, it's her decision. If she doesn't get her dream job in the NICU right out of school, she'll do something else to pay the bills. Things happen for a reason, they don't always go the way we plan. It's really not our problem, or concern, right?


    And as an educator, I figured she'll do what she has to do to get through nursing school, and get through the 90-95% adult rotations (where I used to teach, my students had 4 peds days at best, and about the same (maybe 6) OB days (and no NICU, unless it was an observation day in either Peds or OB if the prof was willing to send you and the unit was willing to take you). I thought, clearly, she'll be professional enough, and understand the importance of it. Then I read this:

    Certainly why I dislike adults. They annoy the hell out of me and i will NEVER care for them as a RN. I would rather remain unemployed until I find a NICU job. ������
    Yikes. That's really all I can say.


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