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ProfRN4, MSN 15,994 Views

Joined Apr 5, '03. ProfRN4 is a Staff Educator. She has '22' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Pediatrics'. Posts: 2,282 (23% Liked) Likes: 1,385

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  • Mar 17

    Quote from amoLucia
    And of course whenever there was problem, it was always 'they need more training'. NOOOOOOO! They need more supervision and followup!
    I am new to staff education, and I can't tell you how many times I've heard this already. "they need to be educated on....". They have BEEN educated ad nauseum on it. They need consequences enforced for failure to comply.

  • Mar 14

    Quote from amoLucia
    And of course whenever there was problem, it was always 'they need more training'. NOOOOOOO! They need more supervision and followup!
    I am new to staff education, and I can't tell you how many times I've heard this already. "they need to be educated on....". They have BEEN educated ad nauseum on it. They need consequences enforced for failure to comply.

  • Mar 5

    Quote from amoLucia
    And of course whenever there was problem, it was always 'they need more training'. NOOOOOOO! They need more supervision and followup!
    I am new to staff education, and I can't tell you how many times I've heard this already. "they need to be educated on....". They have BEEN educated ad nauseum on it. They need consequences enforced for failure to comply.

  • Feb 19

    Quote from nursern724
    One good thing..... the union will fight for you!!!
    Which union is that?!?!?

    Biggest misconception I've ever heard- a union hospital will figh for you. I currently work per-diem at a union hospital. Almost every day the charge nurse fills out a 'protest of assignment' and emphasizes the dangerously low staffing ratios. I haven't seen squat done about it.

    On the flip side, I've also worked at MS Manhasset, med/surg too (pre-magnet). I doubt that it's changed much (there was no shortage when I was there). I do agree with your above comments, but one thing I've learned- the grass is hardly ever greener on the other side. You just have to find your niche, and then the rest becomes tolerable.

    What floor do you work on

  • Feb 12

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Night nurses might need to get home to get their kids off to school. Or their spouses need the car to get to work and the Night nurse is going to do child care all day while needing to sleep. Just sayin'.
    Day nurses have the same issue. The bottom line is, there is no good time for a staff meeting. Day nurses are running out the door, night nurses can't keep their eyes open in the morning (and are also running out the door). Meeting need to be held more than once. I see this in my current workplace; the NM stay late to have the meeting on the night shift. They come in late on those days.

    For the record, I am 'shift neutral', in the ongoing wars. I have worked days, nights, have never been a manager (but a house supervisor) and am now a staff educator, who works primarily nights. I hear the night nurses complain (directly to me, but almost always in a professional, respectful manner), and I overhear the day nurse complain (on my way out) about the NMs. I work closely with the NMs now, so I literally see every side.

  • Feb 12

    Quote from AnnieOK76
    The best nurse manager I've ever had was just a few years ago; I appreciated her because she LEFT US ALONE. By that I mean, she trusted us to manage our schedules after she put it out; if we needed to make a trade we did it and left her a note. She didn't have to "approve" it. If we got to work and the census was low and someone wanted to go back home, or leave in the middle of a shift, we let them; took turns. Didn't have to call to get approval. In fact, we tried to not take advantage of her generous staffing, and not ride the clock. We didn't have an endless stream of memos, emails, etc, about what we "couldn't" do, or "must" do, or need to "try harder" on. She seemed to stay in the background, and I learned later that much of her time was standing up for us in hospital board meetings, doctor meetings, and admin meetings. She always fought for good staffing. She had been a staff nurse. She staffed us well; and I don't ever remember having a request for time off denied. She didn't work on the floor very often, but if the ER went crazy she was there. We also didn't have "mandatory" meetings; I don't really remember many meetings at all. If there was some info that we needed to know she put a typed note in the break room so we would ALL eventually see it. Some would probably call her very "hands-off" or a "do-nothing" manager. I however, found it very refreshing, after 35 years of nursing and feeling like we staff were treated like junior high age people, that we were treated like professional adults. And I believe it caused us to rise to it, and we took care of many problems on our own.

    This was in a very small rural hospital, and might not be possible in a large hospital.
    As you said, it may not be possible in a large hospital. It also may not be possible in some smaller facilities either. It really depends on the culture of the unit. I could see many places where the staffing you mentioned wouldn't work. I am not a manager, but am in a lateral position, so I observe and hear a lot (from both sides). I see units where everyone wants the same days off, and everyone puts themselves on the same days, and refuse to budge. They plot in their own schedule, and the NM or ANM has no choice but to deny.

    As far as memos (what can and can't be done), curious to know, how was this information disseminated then? New policies, situations that staff NEED to be made aware of (as a result of sentinel events, etc) can't be left to chance, hope that the staff gets the info. It can seriously backfire, because the first thing the nurse/CNA/other staff member will say is 'nobody ever told me about that'.

    I consider myself to be more 'hands off' in my approach of things, this is why I ask. I am not a nag; I can't stand that 'mommy' mentality. But in my experiences, sometimes it is necessary. I hate for it to have to get to that point.

  • Jan 19

    A behavior plan? Some sort of contract that rewards positive behavior and takes privileges away when she does throw things? If she is cognizant enough to know what she is doing is wrong, this should work (but I'm no psych nurse )

  • Jan 17

    Quote from Scott8273
    The friend + child: Well, if you must say something, I would write her privately and express your concern in a way that shows you respect her and her mothering, and the child seems so happy and well-adjusted, but did his doctor say anything cuz you're concerned. This would have to be done very carefully and craftily, or you will lose a friend and no one will benefit.

    As for CPS, IMO that's nuts. I have seen them rip families apart for a LOT less than overfeeding a child (which may even be happening because the child has a goofy metabolism, some condition, or God knows what else). To me, that's just a sad commentary on the state of our often hysterical society, and definitely not the route to go. But I could be wrong, of course.
    My thoughts exactly! About CPS and the approach to the mother.

    If it truly comes from a place of caring and concern, think long and hard about how you want to approach it. Or else, it will come across as 'shaming' (which, BTW, I can't stand that term. I feel like everyone thinks they are being 'shamed' when it is something they don't want to hear- I recently heard a teenager say to his mother "why are you shaming me" when she was just pointing out something she wanted him to do).

    Another thought, and question for the OP: do you have kids? I say this with peace and love <3. Because, before I had a child, I never imagined I'd have a kid who was anything but perfect and obedient. I will tell them what to eat, they will eat it (without argument) and they will be healthy, especially since I am a nurse! Fast forward a few (upper teen) years later, and I have a wonderful, beautiful, smart child who loves to eat! With that love of food comes mixed feelings about her body image, and with that comes feelings that I could have done more to prevent this. She is not obese, but she is not 'thin' either (overweight according to charts, but in today's world, does not stand out). I feel like it is harder when you have no experience in being overweight (I have never really struggled with weight). The show This Is Us has an episode about this (I HIGHLY recommend this show ). I am trying to continually reinforce the concepts of portion control, moderation and physical activity. I am a firm believer that restricting a child only forces them to want it more (I had two friends whose kids were like this: acted like fiends whenever given the chance; one was obese- mom tried hard (is a nurse, and was well aware) the other's kid was not (just more controlling, and will admit it.

    I am careful what I post on social media now, because I have been 'called out' by friends (my child never ate two adult meals of fast food, at age 5 nor present day... and the thought of that makes ME cringe too: no human being should consume that much in one sitting). After an innocent pic of her enjoying a sugary drink, or me ranting about how a fast food place forget my foot, and I drove back and ended up in a car accident, I am very careful.

    I also used to be a lot more preachy about safety (helmets, seatbelts/car seats and sitting in the front) and parenting styles (namely the horrors of helicopter parenting and coddling kids, and it's ill-effects when they get to college and the workforce). I stopped this, because I would literally get one or two likes; I was preaching to a crowd that didn't want to hear it.

    The bottom line is, no one really wants to hear these things from their 'friends', and there is usually no good way to tell someone they're 'doing it wrong', without them becoming defensive (especially when it comes to parenting).

  • Jan 16

    Hi. Not sure if I am talking to a student or a current faculty member (but my answer really shouldn't change), so here goes!

    I have seen it done three ways: No review at all, a group review immediately after the exam (under the same strict testing conditions- no writing, no getting up to get your phone/notes, not even a bathroom break before the review begins) and a one-on-one review by appointment (again, no pencils, phones, notes).

    The common denominator in all situations is security. Schools and faculty are paranoid about the exams leaking. When the school I taught in did not review at all, students complained that they didn't really know what the answer was (and no rationale for their wrong answers). So we went back to a very strict review. Bottom line; no difference in overall outcomes (statistics of how man passed/failed, did better on the final, etc).

    As an educator, I will say this: I hate reviews. They are incredibly stressful, emotional, students are scared, stressed, angry and some are downright nasty. While I understand the importance of the review (for the sake of the students' understanding of the questions/answers), I wish there was a way to make it for that, and not a fight for points.

  • Jan 14

    Quote from Scott8273
    The friend + child: Well, if you must say something, I would write her privately and express your concern in a way that shows you respect her and her mothering, and the child seems so happy and well-adjusted, but did his doctor say anything cuz you're concerned. This would have to be done very carefully and craftily, or you will lose a friend and no one will benefit.

    As for CPS, IMO that's nuts. I have seen them rip families apart for a LOT less than overfeeding a child (which may even be happening because the child has a goofy metabolism, some condition, or God knows what else). To me, that's just a sad commentary on the state of our often hysterical society, and definitely not the route to go. But I could be wrong, of course.
    My thoughts exactly! About CPS and the approach to the mother.

    If it truly comes from a place of caring and concern, think long and hard about how you want to approach it. Or else, it will come across as 'shaming' (which, BTW, I can't stand that term. I feel like everyone thinks they are being 'shamed' when it is something they don't want to hear- I recently heard a teenager say to his mother "why are you shaming me" when she was just pointing out something she wanted him to do).

    Another thought, and question for the OP: do you have kids? I say this with peace and love <3. Because, before I had a child, I never imagined I'd have a kid who was anything but perfect and obedient. I will tell them what to eat, they will eat it (without argument) and they will be healthy, especially since I am a nurse! Fast forward a few (upper teen) years later, and I have a wonderful, beautiful, smart child who loves to eat! With that love of food comes mixed feelings about her body image, and with that comes feelings that I could have done more to prevent this. She is not obese, but she is not 'thin' either (overweight according to charts, but in today's world, does not stand out). I feel like it is harder when you have no experience in being overweight (I have never really struggled with weight). The show This Is Us has an episode about this (I HIGHLY recommend this show ). I am trying to continually reinforce the concepts of portion control, moderation and physical activity. I am a firm believer that restricting a child only forces them to want it more (I had two friends whose kids were like this: acted like fiends whenever given the chance; one was obese- mom tried hard (is a nurse, and was well aware) the other's kid was not (just more controlling, and will admit it.

    I am careful what I post on social media now, because I have been 'called out' by friends (my child never ate two adult meals of fast food, at age 5 nor present day... and the thought of that makes ME cringe too: no human being should consume that much in one sitting). After an innocent pic of her enjoying a sugary drink, or me ranting about how a fast food place forget my foot, and I drove back and ended up in a car accident, I am very careful.

    I also used to be a lot more preachy about safety (helmets, seatbelts/car seats and sitting in the front) and parenting styles (namely the horrors of helicopter parenting and coddling kids, and it's ill-effects when they get to college and the workforce). I stopped this, because I would literally get one or two likes; I was preaching to a crowd that didn't want to hear it.

    The bottom line is, no one really wants to hear these things from their 'friends', and there is usually no good way to tell someone they're 'doing it wrong', without them becoming defensive (especially when it comes to parenting).

  • Jan 14

    Quote from Scott8273
    The friend + child: Well, if you must say something, I would write her privately and express your concern in a way that shows you respect her and her mothering, and the child seems so happy and well-adjusted, but did his doctor say anything cuz you're concerned. This would have to be done very carefully and craftily, or you will lose a friend and no one will benefit.

    As for CPS, IMO that's nuts. I have seen them rip families apart for a LOT less than overfeeding a child (which may even be happening because the child has a goofy metabolism, some condition, or God knows what else). To me, that's just a sad commentary on the state of our often hysterical society, and definitely not the route to go. But I could be wrong, of course.
    My thoughts exactly! About CPS and the approach to the mother.

    If it truly comes from a place of caring and concern, think long and hard about how you want to approach it. Or else, it will come across as 'shaming' (which, BTW, I can't stand that term. I feel like everyone thinks they are being 'shamed' when it is something they don't want to hear- I recently heard a teenager say to his mother "why are you shaming me" when she was just pointing out something she wanted him to do).

    Another thought, and question for the OP: do you have kids? I say this with peace and love <3. Because, before I had a child, I never imagined I'd have a kid who was anything but perfect and obedient. I will tell them what to eat, they will eat it (without argument) and they will be healthy, especially since I am a nurse! Fast forward a few (upper teen) years later, and I have a wonderful, beautiful, smart child who loves to eat! With that love of food comes mixed feelings about her body image, and with that comes feelings that I could have done more to prevent this. She is not obese, but she is not 'thin' either (overweight according to charts, but in today's world, does not stand out). I feel like it is harder when you have no experience in being overweight (I have never really struggled with weight). The show This Is Us has an episode about this (I HIGHLY recommend this show ). I am trying to continually reinforce the concepts of portion control, moderation and physical activity. I am a firm believer that restricting a child only forces them to want it more (I had two friends whose kids were like this: acted like fiends whenever given the chance; one was obese- mom tried hard (is a nurse, and was well aware) the other's kid was not (just more controlling, and will admit it.

    I am careful what I post on social media now, because I have been 'called out' by friends (my child never ate two adult meals of fast food, at age 5 nor present day... and the thought of that makes ME cringe too: no human being should consume that much in one sitting). After an innocent pic of her enjoying a sugary drink, or me ranting about how a fast food place forget my foot, and I drove back and ended up in a car accident, I am very careful.

    I also used to be a lot more preachy about safety (helmets, seatbelts/car seats and sitting in the front) and parenting styles (namely the horrors of helicopter parenting and coddling kids, and it's ill-effects when they get to college and the workforce). I stopped this, because I would literally get one or two likes; I was preaching to a crowd that didn't want to hear it.

    The bottom line is, no one really wants to hear these things from their 'friends', and there is usually no good way to tell someone they're 'doing it wrong', without them becoming defensive (especially when it comes to parenting).

  • Jan 13

    I will preface my reply with this: I am leaving my job in academia very shortly, so my answers may very well reflect this (note, it is a bittersweet transition for me, and I am nervous about it!)

    Salary: I cannot speak for Florida, but where I live and work, I make less than my new grads start out making Money is not everything, but it does make a huge impact on things (especially if you are taking a pay cut to do this). Before I started teaching, I was working a hybrid of per-diem and a part time job, making not quite what a full time nurse was making (while being a full time mommy and finishing up my masters), so it didn't hit me that hard in the beginning. Now, years later, I am realizing how much money I was sacrificing over the years.

    It is somewhat possible to work per diem, but it really depends on the demands of the program you teach in. Assuming you work in a college/university setting, you will have spring, summer and Chirstmas vacations, which should afford you the time to do so. But for me, it was hard to keep a per-diem commitment (because I couldn't balance any sort of work during the actual school year, and my per diem job had a minimum commitment).

    So yes, time off is a plus. I wouldn't say I was always home for my kids' drop offs and pick ups (early clinical hours did not allow for this). I've also had to roate to evening lectures (missing some evening school events). It's great to have Columbus day, labor day, and all those little (and Big- Christmas) holidays off. But the downside to teaching is, it is very hard to take a regular day off (your class/clinical needs to be covered, or made up if you have to cancel in an emergency). You can't ever go on vacation during a random week (it will always be when the rest of the world is on vaca). Obviously, flexibility is contingent upon your colleagues (if they can help you out in any way).

    Pro- no nights, weekends! You have more of a normal schedule.
    Con- you WILL bring work home. More than you think!

    Pro- You rarely stay late on the floor, because of work not getting done.
    Con- you have to ensure each student did what they were assigned to do (meds signed off, charting, signing off to RN, etc)

    Pro- many students are great! Eager to learn, excited when they make connections (you get as excited as they do), most are grateful of what you have to offer.
    Con- some are just not cut out to do this, and you know it, and it is difficult to quantify this on paper (without looking like you are 'out to get them'). It is heartbreaking sometimes, and you wish you can do more for them. But some just struggle, or cannot commit fully to their studies. Not so heartbreaking (more irritating/frustrating) are the ones who don't try, don't care, and are unprofessional. Late, unaccountable, poor paperwork, limited motivation. Some will test your limits. Cell phone usage, not respecting their classmates by listening to them in pre-post conferences, attempting to cut corners. These students represent a small percentage (depending on what program you teach in, and what course/level they are in), but there are enough to cause frustration.

    Pro-seeing their growth from week 1 to week 15
    Con- getting a brand new group and starting all over (it's like the movie Groundhog Day). In theory, I'd LOVE to follow a cohort from 1st nursing class to last, to see the true growth!

  • Jan 13

    Quote from Scott8273
    The friend + child: Well, if you must say something, I would write her privately and express your concern in a way that shows you respect her and her mothering, and the child seems so happy and well-adjusted, but did his doctor say anything cuz you're concerned. This would have to be done very carefully and craftily, or you will lose a friend and no one will benefit.

    As for CPS, IMO that's nuts. I have seen them rip families apart for a LOT less than overfeeding a child (which may even be happening because the child has a goofy metabolism, some condition, or God knows what else). To me, that's just a sad commentary on the state of our often hysterical society, and definitely not the route to go. But I could be wrong, of course.
    My thoughts exactly! About CPS and the approach to the mother.

    If it truly comes from a place of caring and concern, think long and hard about how you want to approach it. Or else, it will come across as 'shaming' (which, BTW, I can't stand that term. I feel like everyone thinks they are being 'shamed' when it is something they don't want to hear- I recently heard a teenager say to his mother "why are you shaming me" when she was just pointing out something she wanted him to do).

    Another thought, and question for the OP: do you have kids? I say this with peace and love <3. Because, before I had a child, I never imagined I'd have a kid who was anything but perfect and obedient. I will tell them what to eat, they will eat it (without argument) and they will be healthy, especially since I am a nurse! Fast forward a few (upper teen) years later, and I have a wonderful, beautiful, smart child who loves to eat! With that love of food comes mixed feelings about her body image, and with that comes feelings that I could have done more to prevent this. She is not obese, but she is not 'thin' either (overweight according to charts, but in today's world, does not stand out). I feel like it is harder when you have no experience in being overweight (I have never really struggled with weight). The show This Is Us has an episode about this (I HIGHLY recommend this show ). I am trying to continually reinforce the concepts of portion control, moderation and physical activity. I am a firm believer that restricting a child only forces them to want it more (I had two friends whose kids were like this: acted like fiends whenever given the chance; one was obese- mom tried hard (is a nurse, and was well aware) the other's kid was not (just more controlling, and will admit it.

    I am careful what I post on social media now, because I have been 'called out' by friends (my child never ate two adult meals of fast food, at age 5 nor present day... and the thought of that makes ME cringe too: no human being should consume that much in one sitting). After an innocent pic of her enjoying a sugary drink, or me ranting about how a fast food place forget my foot, and I drove back and ended up in a car accident, I am very careful.

    I also used to be a lot more preachy about safety (helmets, seatbelts/car seats and sitting in the front) and parenting styles (namely the horrors of helicopter parenting and coddling kids, and it's ill-effects when they get to college and the workforce). I stopped this, because I would literally get one or two likes; I was preaching to a crowd that didn't want to hear it.

    The bottom line is, no one really wants to hear these things from their 'friends', and there is usually no good way to tell someone they're 'doing it wrong', without them becoming defensive (especially when it comes to parenting).

  • Jan 10

    Quote from pookashellz
    and this is why i can't stand old people- they force us all to live in the past, instead of realizing that society progresses and updating their views. also, there should be NO judgment of others -for purple hair or anything else- when you can't even wipe your own ass; they should just be grateful they're being taken care of and ****.
    And this is why some old people can't stand young people.

  • Jan 4

    Quote from PARichards
    To those who work in online education, what experience are you looking for in applicants to instructor (or mentor or adjunct? so many distinctions!) positions in addition to a MSN in education? I feel like I will complete my program and not have a lot of teaching experience outside of the bedside to recommend me- makes me anxious!
    I do not have online teaching experience (as I am the OP, who was inquiring), but I would imagine they would want someone with some traditional experience, as a starting point for teaching. In my current job now, I am teaching a hybrid course (partially online, in a brick and mortar program). While this seems to be much more common in my region and university system, they will never truly go completely online (it is a traditional, community college ADN program). I have used many online tools in my courses thus far (for students to complete prior to class, as study tools, and as well as 'virtual conferences' . I feel like my current position has given me experience to venture into this field on a part time basis, and/or as a mentor. Mentoring is a constant part of my job, and I actually enjoy it!

    PARichards: we all started somewhere; many of us as adjuncts. I was fortunate enough to start as 'part time' in the school where I got my ADN (a classmate in my masters program was doing her practicum there, and she told me they were looking, so I put myself out there, and it paid off). Hopefully your practicum experience will lead to something more. I've also known a few nurses who made their start as adjuncts, per the recommendation of clinical instructors on their units. If you work in a specialty where students come for clinicals, speak to the instructor. If you are one of those nurses that he/she loves giving students to, they may steer you in the right direction (with a good word).


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