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ProfRN4, MSN 16,951 Views

Joined Apr 5, '03. ProfRN4 is a Staff Educator. She has '22' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Pediatrics'. Posts: 2,282 (23% Liked) Likes: 1,390

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  • Jul 21

    It sounds like what you want to hear is "with your training and education, you can get a job as a ________ ". Unfortunately, with nursing, it's not that easy. I've been there, many years ago, when I didn't pass NCLEX on the first try. Unless your program gave you specific certifications (like CNA), you're not technically considered "qualified" for any ancillary positions. One of the reasons being that all programs are different in what skills they require of their students (I.e., in my program we did not learn blood draws or venipuncture, so I was definitely not going to get hired to do that). After hitting many dead ends, I finally found work as a home attendant (through my fiends mother, who managed the agency). Even with that, I had to sit through a class (apparently passing nursing school wasn't enough to say I knew how to bathe and transfer patients).

    Since I don't live in CA, I wouldn't pretend to advise you on what you can and can't do with your current skills set. I am generalizing based on what i went through, and what my graduates are currently going through. But I do live in another major city, and I know that RNs who have passed NLCEX are struggling to find work, so I would imagine that someone in your shoes in my area would struggle even more.

    Regarding EMT, you have to be certified (at least where I am, you have to). nursing school training/experience is not transferable.

  • Jul 2

    man, my job is so boring...

  • Jun 30

    Quote from pookashellz
    and this is why i can't stand old people- they force us all to live in the past, instead of realizing that society progresses and updating their views. also, there should be NO judgment of others -for purple hair or anything else- when you can't even wipe your own ass; they should just be grateful they're being taken care of and ****.
    And this is why some old people can't stand young people.

  • May 29

    Quote from amoLucia
    And of course whenever there was problem, it was always 'they need more training'. NOOOOOOO! They need more supervision and followup!
    I am new to staff education, and I can't tell you how many times I've heard this already. "they need to be educated on....". They have BEEN educated ad nauseum on it. They need consequences enforced for failure to comply.

  • Apr 3

    Well well well, one day later and this is where the thread has gone. Shocker

    If you're question was a legitimate one, stemming from pure ignorance (not in an insulting way, but actually asking because you didn't know), this would have been a more constructive thread. Like when my mother asked me why I have to go back to school for my PhD. Of course, my mothers inquiry did not include a passive aggressive approach at insulting and degrading our profession.

  • Mar 17

    Quote from amoLucia
    And of course whenever there was problem, it was always 'they need more training'. NOOOOOOO! They need more supervision and followup!
    I am new to staff education, and I can't tell you how many times I've heard this already. "they need to be educated on....". They have BEEN educated ad nauseum on it. They need consequences enforced for failure to comply.

  • Mar 14

    Quote from amoLucia
    And of course whenever there was problem, it was always 'they need more training'. NOOOOOOO! They need more supervision and followup!
    I am new to staff education, and I can't tell you how many times I've heard this already. "they need to be educated on....". They have BEEN educated ad nauseum on it. They need consequences enforced for failure to comply.

  • Mar 5

    Quote from amoLucia
    And of course whenever there was problem, it was always 'they need more training'. NOOOOOOO! They need more supervision and followup!
    I am new to staff education, and I can't tell you how many times I've heard this already. "they need to be educated on....". They have BEEN educated ad nauseum on it. They need consequences enforced for failure to comply.

  • Feb 19

    Quote from nursern724
    One good thing..... the union will fight for you!!!
    Which union is that?!?!?

    Biggest misconception I've ever heard- a union hospital will figh for you. I currently work per-diem at a union hospital. Almost every day the charge nurse fills out a 'protest of assignment' and emphasizes the dangerously low staffing ratios. I haven't seen squat done about it.

    On the flip side, I've also worked at MS Manhasset, med/surg too (pre-magnet). I doubt that it's changed much (there was no shortage when I was there). I do agree with your above comments, but one thing I've learned- the grass is hardly ever greener on the other side. You just have to find your niche, and then the rest becomes tolerable.

    What floor do you work on

  • Feb 12

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Night nurses might need to get home to get their kids off to school. Or their spouses need the car to get to work and the Night nurse is going to do child care all day while needing to sleep. Just sayin'.
    Day nurses have the same issue. The bottom line is, there is no good time for a staff meeting. Day nurses are running out the door, night nurses can't keep their eyes open in the morning (and are also running out the door). Meeting need to be held more than once. I see this in my current workplace; the NM stay late to have the meeting on the night shift. They come in late on those days.

    For the record, I am 'shift neutral', in the ongoing wars. I have worked days, nights, have never been a manager (but a house supervisor) and am now a staff educator, who works primarily nights. I hear the night nurses complain (directly to me, but almost always in a professional, respectful manner), and I overhear the day nurse complain (on my way out) about the NMs. I work closely with the NMs now, so I literally see every side.

  • Feb 12

    Quote from AnnieOK76
    The best nurse manager I've ever had was just a few years ago; I appreciated her because she LEFT US ALONE. By that I mean, she trusted us to manage our schedules after she put it out; if we needed to make a trade we did it and left her a note. She didn't have to "approve" it. If we got to work and the census was low and someone wanted to go back home, or leave in the middle of a shift, we let them; took turns. Didn't have to call to get approval. In fact, we tried to not take advantage of her generous staffing, and not ride the clock. We didn't have an endless stream of memos, emails, etc, about what we "couldn't" do, or "must" do, or need to "try harder" on. She seemed to stay in the background, and I learned later that much of her time was standing up for us in hospital board meetings, doctor meetings, and admin meetings. She always fought for good staffing. She had been a staff nurse. She staffed us well; and I don't ever remember having a request for time off denied. She didn't work on the floor very often, but if the ER went crazy she was there. We also didn't have "mandatory" meetings; I don't really remember many meetings at all. If there was some info that we needed to know she put a typed note in the break room so we would ALL eventually see it. Some would probably call her very "hands-off" or a "do-nothing" manager. I however, found it very refreshing, after 35 years of nursing and feeling like we staff were treated like junior high age people, that we were treated like professional adults. And I believe it caused us to rise to it, and we took care of many problems on our own.

    This was in a very small rural hospital, and might not be possible in a large hospital.
    As you said, it may not be possible in a large hospital. It also may not be possible in some smaller facilities either. It really depends on the culture of the unit. I could see many places where the staffing you mentioned wouldn't work. I am not a manager, but am in a lateral position, so I observe and hear a lot (from both sides). I see units where everyone wants the same days off, and everyone puts themselves on the same days, and refuse to budge. They plot in their own schedule, and the NM or ANM has no choice but to deny.

    As far as memos (what can and can't be done), curious to know, how was this information disseminated then? New policies, situations that staff NEED to be made aware of (as a result of sentinel events, etc) can't be left to chance, hope that the staff gets the info. It can seriously backfire, because the first thing the nurse/CNA/other staff member will say is 'nobody ever told me about that'.

    I consider myself to be more 'hands off' in my approach of things, this is why I ask. I am not a nag; I can't stand that 'mommy' mentality. But in my experiences, sometimes it is necessary. I hate for it to have to get to that point.

  • Jan 19

    A behavior plan? Some sort of contract that rewards positive behavior and takes privileges away when she does throw things? If she is cognizant enough to know what she is doing is wrong, this should work (but I'm no psych nurse )

  • Jan 17

    Quote from Scott8273
    The friend + child: Well, if you must say something, I would write her privately and express your concern in a way that shows you respect her and her mothering, and the child seems so happy and well-adjusted, but did his doctor say anything cuz you're concerned. This would have to be done very carefully and craftily, or you will lose a friend and no one will benefit.

    As for CPS, IMO that's nuts. I have seen them rip families apart for a LOT less than overfeeding a child (which may even be happening because the child has a goofy metabolism, some condition, or God knows what else). To me, that's just a sad commentary on the state of our often hysterical society, and definitely not the route to go. But I could be wrong, of course.
    My thoughts exactly! About CPS and the approach to the mother.

    If it truly comes from a place of caring and concern, think long and hard about how you want to approach it. Or else, it will come across as 'shaming' (which, BTW, I can't stand that term. I feel like everyone thinks they are being 'shamed' when it is something they don't want to hear- I recently heard a teenager say to his mother "why are you shaming me" when she was just pointing out something she wanted him to do).

    Another thought, and question for the OP: do you have kids? I say this with peace and love <3. Because, before I had a child, I never imagined I'd have a kid who was anything but perfect and obedient. I will tell them what to eat, they will eat it (without argument) and they will be healthy, especially since I am a nurse! Fast forward a few (upper teen) years later, and I have a wonderful, beautiful, smart child who loves to eat! With that love of food comes mixed feelings about her body image, and with that comes feelings that I could have done more to prevent this. She is not obese, but she is not 'thin' either (overweight according to charts, but in today's world, does not stand out). I feel like it is harder when you have no experience in being overweight (I have never really struggled with weight). The show This Is Us has an episode about this (I HIGHLY recommend this show ). I am trying to continually reinforce the concepts of portion control, moderation and physical activity. I am a firm believer that restricting a child only forces them to want it more (I had two friends whose kids were like this: acted like fiends whenever given the chance; one was obese- mom tried hard (is a nurse, and was well aware) the other's kid was not (just more controlling, and will admit it.

    I am careful what I post on social media now, because I have been 'called out' by friends (my child never ate two adult meals of fast food, at age 5 nor present day... and the thought of that makes ME cringe too: no human being should consume that much in one sitting). After an innocent pic of her enjoying a sugary drink, or me ranting about how a fast food place forget my foot, and I drove back and ended up in a car accident, I am very careful.

    I also used to be a lot more preachy about safety (helmets, seatbelts/car seats and sitting in the front) and parenting styles (namely the horrors of helicopter parenting and coddling kids, and it's ill-effects when they get to college and the workforce). I stopped this, because I would literally get one or two likes; I was preaching to a crowd that didn't want to hear it.

    The bottom line is, no one really wants to hear these things from their 'friends', and there is usually no good way to tell someone they're 'doing it wrong', without them becoming defensive (especially when it comes to parenting).

  • Jan 16

    Hi. Not sure if I am talking to a student or a current faculty member (but my answer really shouldn't change), so here goes!

    I have seen it done three ways: No review at all, a group review immediately after the exam (under the same strict testing conditions- no writing, no getting up to get your phone/notes, not even a bathroom break before the review begins) and a one-on-one review by appointment (again, no pencils, phones, notes).

    The common denominator in all situations is security. Schools and faculty are paranoid about the exams leaking. When the school I taught in did not review at all, students complained that they didn't really know what the answer was (and no rationale for their wrong answers). So we went back to a very strict review. Bottom line; no difference in overall outcomes (statistics of how man passed/failed, did better on the final, etc).

    As an educator, I will say this: I hate reviews. They are incredibly stressful, emotional, students are scared, stressed, angry and some are downright nasty. While I understand the importance of the review (for the sake of the students' understanding of the questions/answers), I wish there was a way to make it for that, and not a fight for points.

  • Jan 14

    Quote from Scott8273
    The friend + child: Well, if you must say something, I would write her privately and express your concern in a way that shows you respect her and her mothering, and the child seems so happy and well-adjusted, but did his doctor say anything cuz you're concerned. This would have to be done very carefully and craftily, or you will lose a friend and no one will benefit.

    As for CPS, IMO that's nuts. I have seen them rip families apart for a LOT less than overfeeding a child (which may even be happening because the child has a goofy metabolism, some condition, or God knows what else). To me, that's just a sad commentary on the state of our often hysterical society, and definitely not the route to go. But I could be wrong, of course.
    My thoughts exactly! About CPS and the approach to the mother.

    If it truly comes from a place of caring and concern, think long and hard about how you want to approach it. Or else, it will come across as 'shaming' (which, BTW, I can't stand that term. I feel like everyone thinks they are being 'shamed' when it is something they don't want to hear- I recently heard a teenager say to his mother "why are you shaming me" when she was just pointing out something she wanted him to do).

    Another thought, and question for the OP: do you have kids? I say this with peace and love <3. Because, before I had a child, I never imagined I'd have a kid who was anything but perfect and obedient. I will tell them what to eat, they will eat it (without argument) and they will be healthy, especially since I am a nurse! Fast forward a few (upper teen) years later, and I have a wonderful, beautiful, smart child who loves to eat! With that love of food comes mixed feelings about her body image, and with that comes feelings that I could have done more to prevent this. She is not obese, but she is not 'thin' either (overweight according to charts, but in today's world, does not stand out). I feel like it is harder when you have no experience in being overweight (I have never really struggled with weight). The show This Is Us has an episode about this (I HIGHLY recommend this show ). I am trying to continually reinforce the concepts of portion control, moderation and physical activity. I am a firm believer that restricting a child only forces them to want it more (I had two friends whose kids were like this: acted like fiends whenever given the chance; one was obese- mom tried hard (is a nurse, and was well aware) the other's kid was not (just more controlling, and will admit it.

    I am careful what I post on social media now, because I have been 'called out' by friends (my child never ate two adult meals of fast food, at age 5 nor present day... and the thought of that makes ME cringe too: no human being should consume that much in one sitting). After an innocent pic of her enjoying a sugary drink, or me ranting about how a fast food place forget my foot, and I drove back and ended up in a car accident, I am very careful.

    I also used to be a lot more preachy about safety (helmets, seatbelts/car seats and sitting in the front) and parenting styles (namely the horrors of helicopter parenting and coddling kids, and it's ill-effects when they get to college and the workforce). I stopped this, because I would literally get one or two likes; I was preaching to a crowd that didn't want to hear it.

    The bottom line is, no one really wants to hear these things from their 'friends', and there is usually no good way to tell someone they're 'doing it wrong', without them becoming defensive (especially when it comes to parenting).


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