Latest Likes For ProfRN4

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ProfRN4 13,005 Views

Joined Apr 5, '03. ProfRN4 is a nursing professor. She has '19' year(s) of experience. Posts: 2,235 (22% Liked) Likes: 1,307

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  • May 14

    Quote from x_factor

    I agree with this. Jobs are not going to care whether you earned A's or C's in nursing school, they just care that you graduated and passed the NCLEX..
    Actually, I'm finding this to be untrue, at least where I live. The top students in our graduating class are the ones getting the prime jobs. I doubt this is a coincidence.

  • May 1

    It was always my understanding that the trough you draw before the dose will subsequently affect whether you give the next dose (not the dose you are drawing the level right before). If the doc did not wright "draw trough level at 12pm and hold 12pm dose" why would you hold it? Unless this specific institution has a policy stating you hold the dose that you are drawing the trough before, then you are not wrong (IMO).

    This is the problem with nursing; too many variations on things that should be standard

  • Apr 30

    Quote from BadStudent01
    I am a third-semester nursing student who has been using test banks since my first semester in the program. You could say that I discovered the existence of test banks by accident, but ever since I began using them, I have scored nearly 100 on every test I have taken. But here is the catch -- my teachers don't use questions from just one test bank.
    While it seems you have put a lot of effort into studying, and exposing yourself to as many different questions as you can, you're still cheating, in a sense. You don't know which of the bank questions will appear, but the fact that you are accessing a bank that is not meant for public (student) viewing, this is where the problem lies.

  • Apr 28

    Quote from thimba
    Here's how it could end badly... The student gets a compliment (like they are a child) then decides from that compliment they are excelling at clinicals and don't need to do anything more. Then they stand around even more.

    Another compliment? "Wow! I'm really doing everything right this semester. No need to change any of my behavior." = Continues being useless on the floor.

    They are students, not children. If they don't deserve a compliment, then they shouldn't receive one as some sort of backhanded way to attempt to make them useful during their shift.
    This.

    Not every student is whiny and unmotivated. But many of them are. They want to be nurses, but want to do as little as possible in clinical to accomplish the requirements, or they only want to do the 'cool' stuff. It's not my responsibility to convince adults that they want to do the job they are in school for. It makes me question of they really want to be there.

    And the over-praising of menial, expected tasks/accomplishments has gotten out of hand. I can honestly say, with every student whom I've had that has struggled, I can and do compliment them on their strengths. I am able to see good in (almost) everyone, and don't want to complely deflate them. But sometimes overdoing the compliments when they are sandwiched in with criticisms can be confusing to them. Sometimes they can't hear the 'but you're still failing'.

  • Apr 27

    Quote from BadStudent01
    I am a third-semester nursing student who has been using test banks since my first semester in the program. You could say that I discovered the existence of test banks by accident, but ever since I began using them, I have scored nearly 100 on every test I have taken. But here is the catch -- my teachers don't use questions from just one test bank.
    While it seems you have put a lot of effort into studying, and exposing yourself to as many different questions as you can, you're still cheating, in a sense. You don't know which of the bank questions will appear, but the fact that you are accessing a bank that is not meant for public (student) viewing, this is where the problem lies.

  • Apr 27

    Quote from milesims
    Perhaps universities and instructors should find alternatives to test banks. I don't know what it could possibly be, but the only solution I can think of is writing your own exam questions. It's a difficult situation. What are your thoughts?
    This is what we do (sort of). We adapt questions we find in banks and public sites. We create brand new questions from scratch as well. The result is often confusion and anger from the students. The students feel that our questions are way too complicated and 'tricky'. It is too much work from all ends.

  • Apr 26

    Quote from BadStudent01
    I am a third-semester nursing student who has been using test banks since my first semester in the program. You could say that I discovered the existence of test banks by accident, but ever since I began using them, I have scored nearly 100 on every test I have taken. But here is the catch -- my teachers don't use questions from just one test bank.
    While it seems you have put a lot of effort into studying, and exposing yourself to as many different questions as you can, you're still cheating, in a sense. You don't know which of the bank questions will appear, but the fact that you are accessing a bank that is not meant for public (student) viewing, this is where the problem lies.

  • Apr 26

    Quote from BadStudent01
    I am a third-semester nursing student who has been using test banks since my first semester in the program. You could say that I discovered the existence of test banks by accident, but ever since I began using them, I have scored nearly 100 on every test I have taken. But here is the catch -- my teachers don't use questions from just one test bank.
    While it seems you have put a lot of effort into studying, and exposing yourself to as many different questions as you can, you're still cheating, in a sense. You don't know which of the bank questions will appear, but the fact that you are accessing a bank that is not meant for public (student) viewing, this is where the problem lies.

  • Apr 26

    Quote from milesims
    Perhaps universities and instructors should find alternatives to test banks. I don't know what it could possibly be, but the only solution I can think of is writing your own exam questions. It's a difficult situation. What are your thoughts?
    This is what we do (sort of). We adapt questions we find in banks and public sites. We create brand new questions from scratch as well. The result is often confusion and anger from the students. The students feel that our questions are way too complicated and 'tricky'. It is too much work from all ends.

  • Apr 23

    Quote from Spidey's mom
    Now obviously I graduated 19 years ago, but I wonder too about where some of y'all are going to nursing school? Because there is NO way any of the things mentioned would have been tolerated.

    It sounds like the teachers are just not as firm about the rules like they used to be . . . maybe a sign of the times??

    Having kids was no excuse for not meeting your obligations as a nursing student. And you do have obligations.
    The problem is, it needs to come from ALL faculty, and the higher ups. I teach in the second level class, and I find it hard to believe that all of a sudden, students think they have a golden ticket to do whatever they want once they make it out of Fundamentals. So I asked around, and learned that many in the course me did not reinforce such things, and did not role model these behaviors themselves.

    It is incredibly draining to be on top of students who do not comply with professional behaviors. The excuses we hear, oh my goodness!! I feel like all of a sudden, everyone has medical issues!! In my course, we have failed students for excessive absences/latenesses to clinical. But in the classroom it isn't enforced nearly as much. Many of us are of the belief that you can come to class, or not... but don't come crying to us if you don't pass!

  • Apr 22

    Quote from Spidey's mom
    Now obviously I graduated 19 years ago, but I wonder too about where some of y'all are going to nursing school? Because there is NO way any of the things mentioned would have been tolerated.

    It sounds like the teachers are just not as firm about the rules like they used to be . . . maybe a sign of the times??

    Having kids was no excuse for not meeting your obligations as a nursing student. And you do have obligations.
    The problem is, it needs to come from ALL faculty, and the higher ups. I teach in the second level class, and I find it hard to believe that all of a sudden, students think they have a golden ticket to do whatever they want once they make it out of Fundamentals. So I asked around, and learned that many in the course me did not reinforce such things, and did not role model these behaviors themselves.

    It is incredibly draining to be on top of students who do not comply with professional behaviors. The excuses we hear, oh my goodness!! I feel like all of a sudden, everyone has medical issues!! In my course, we have failed students for excessive absences/latenesses to clinical. But in the classroom it isn't enforced nearly as much. Many of us are of the belief that you can come to class, or not... but don't come crying to us if you don't pass!

  • Apr 21

    Quote from Spidey's mom
    Now obviously I graduated 19 years ago, but I wonder too about where some of y'all are going to nursing school? Because there is NO way any of the things mentioned would have been tolerated.

    It sounds like the teachers are just not as firm about the rules like they used to be . . . maybe a sign of the times??

    Having kids was no excuse for not meeting your obligations as a nursing student. And you do have obligations.
    The problem is, it needs to come from ALL faculty, and the higher ups. I teach in the second level class, and I find it hard to believe that all of a sudden, students think they have a golden ticket to do whatever they want once they make it out of Fundamentals. So I asked around, and learned that many in the course me did not reinforce such things, and did not role model these behaviors themselves.

    It is incredibly draining to be on top of students who do not comply with professional behaviors. The excuses we hear, oh my goodness!! I feel like all of a sudden, everyone has medical issues!! In my course, we have failed students for excessive absences/latenesses to clinical. But in the classroom it isn't enforced nearly as much. Many of us are of the belief that you can come to class, or not... but don't come crying to us if you don't pass!

  • Apr 21

    Quote from Spidey's mom
    Now obviously I graduated 19 years ago, but I wonder too about where some of y'all are going to nursing school? Because there is NO way any of the things mentioned would have been tolerated.

    It sounds like the teachers are just not as firm about the rules like they used to be . . . maybe a sign of the times??

    Having kids was no excuse for not meeting your obligations as a nursing student. And you do have obligations.
    The problem is, it needs to come from ALL faculty, and the higher ups. I teach in the second level class, and I find it hard to believe that all of a sudden, students think they have a golden ticket to do whatever they want once they make it out of Fundamentals. So I asked around, and learned that many in the course me did not reinforce such things, and did not role model these behaviors themselves.

    It is incredibly draining to be on top of students who do not comply with professional behaviors. The excuses we hear, oh my goodness!! I feel like all of a sudden, everyone has medical issues!! In my course, we have failed students for excessive absences/latenesses to clinical. But in the classroom it isn't enforced nearly as much. Many of us are of the belief that you can come to class, or not... but don't come crying to us if you don't pass!

  • Apr 19

    I'm an instructor, and I love to hear about how 'unfair' NCLEX is. Why? Because the little man behind the computer is not 'out to get you' like we are :chuckle. It is what it is, and there's nothing you can do about it. I hope your school prepared you for this. I know we have been in our school, and of course the students can't stand it. They are extremely difficult, my head would be spinning if I had to answer them. I'm eager to share this with my soon-to-be-graduating students (the part about you getting 27 SATAs, that is).

    Having said that, I'll bet you that you did pass. Because the SATAs are higher level questions, and you need less of those to pass. if you weren't getting them right, the computer would not have shut off at 75. They cannot determine that you do not know enough by that little amount of high level questions. That wouldn't be fair. If they were 75 knowledge or application questions, then I would be worrying.

    So just sit back and relax, and let us know when we can congratulate you

  • Apr 17

    Quote from thimba
    Here's how it could end badly... The student gets a compliment (like they are a child) then decides from that compliment they are excelling at clinicals and don't need to do anything more. Then they stand around even more.

    Another compliment? "Wow! I'm really doing everything right this semester. No need to change any of my behavior." = Continues being useless on the floor.

    They are students, not children. If they don't deserve a compliment, then they shouldn't receive one as some sort of backhanded way to attempt to make them useful during their shift.
    This.

    Not every student is whiny and unmotivated. But many of them are. They want to be nurses, but want to do as little as possible in clinical to accomplish the requirements, or they only want to do the 'cool' stuff. It's not my responsibility to convince adults that they want to do the job they are in school for. It makes me question of they really want to be there.

    And the over-praising of menial, expected tasks/accomplishments has gotten out of hand. I can honestly say, with every student whom I've had that has struggled, I can and do compliment them on their strengths. I am able to see good in (almost) everyone, and don't want to complely deflate them. But sometimes overdoing the compliments when they are sandwiched in with criticisms can be confusing to them. Sometimes they can't hear the 'but you're still failing'.


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