Latest Likes For ProfRN4

Latest Likes For ProfRN4

ProfRN4, MSN 14,377 Views

Joined Apr 5, '03. ProfRN4 is a nursing professor. She has '20+' year(s) of experience. Posts: 2,253 (22% Liked) Likes: 1,333

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  • Sep 28

    Quote from Aliens05
    Guess i dont remember asking for any opinions on an easy job...low stress doesnt mean easy....
    Essentially, these terms are interchangeable for many of us seasoned nurses. I imagine they may not always be, but if a job is low stress, it is easier for one to get up every day and do it. However, some people just don't stress as easy as others; their job/specialty may be difficult, but they do not stress over it. When I worked in Peds Oncology, it was a difficult job; I did not find it stressful. I am a Professor now, and I find it incredibly stressful (while many would not consider what I do hard, because many think we do nothing ). But the stress surrounding my workplace has made me really dislike what I do.

    I know you are a student, but how far along are you? Have you observed the nurses you encounter in clinicals? What is your perception of what they do, and do you find it to be stressful?

    Also, I wonder how old you might be (roughly). Are you beginning your adulthood, and is nursing your first career? I am well into my nursing career (20+ years) and I feel the way the Commuter does (as per your paraphrasing). But again, I've been at this for more than half my life now. I'm tired. When was a new, young nurse, I was up for the challenge, wanting to work where the action was. I hate generalizing about generations (because not all fall into that category), but if you are at the beginning of your professional life, you are not going to realistically achieve that balance, while making a ton of money. You need to put in your dues (this is true in any profession you choose). While no one wants stress, you should want to get out there and be the best nurse you could be. With almost every promotion, raise up the clinical ladder an increase in salary, comes and increase in responsibility. If a Master's or Doctoral degree is required, more is required of the position (and in some cases, there is no significant increase in salary). There are many nurses out there who have given up higher paying jobs as a trade off to a more manageable lifestyle (either for their own mental being, or to balance working and having a family). Then, there are others who do not, because they cannot afford the pay cut (many a night nurse would love to work days, but cannot afford to lose that differential).

    And, as many have already said, the 'cushy' jobs are cushy because the nurses are seasoned enough to know how to do the job. Jobs that a new nurse could never handle, nor would be hired to without significant experience.

  • Sep 28

    Quote from Aliens05
    Guess i dont remember asking for any opinions on an easy job...low stress doesnt mean easy....
    Essentially, these terms are interchangeable for many of us seasoned nurses. I imagine they may not always be, but if a job is low stress, it is easier for one to get up every day and do it. However, some people just don't stress as easy as others; their job/specialty may be difficult, but they do not stress over it. When I worked in Peds Oncology, it was a difficult job; I did not find it stressful. I am a Professor now, and I find it incredibly stressful (while many would not consider what I do hard, because many think we do nothing ). But the stress surrounding my workplace has made me really dislike what I do.

    I know you are a student, but how far along are you? Have you observed the nurses you encounter in clinicals? What is your perception of what they do, and do you find it to be stressful?

    Also, I wonder how old you might be (roughly). Are you beginning your adulthood, and is nursing your first career? I am well into my nursing career (20+ years) and I feel the way the Commuter does (as per your paraphrasing). But again, I've been at this for more than half my life now. I'm tired. When was a new, young nurse, I was up for the challenge, wanting to work where the action was. I hate generalizing about generations (because not all fall into that category), but if you are at the beginning of your professional life, you are not going to realistically achieve that balance, while making a ton of money. You need to put in your dues (this is true in any profession you choose). While no one wants stress, you should want to get out there and be the best nurse you could be. With almost every promotion, raise up the clinical ladder an increase in salary, comes and increase in responsibility. If a Master's or Doctoral degree is required, more is required of the position (and in some cases, there is no significant increase in salary). There are many nurses out there who have given up higher paying jobs as a trade off to a more manageable lifestyle (either for their own mental being, or to balance working and having a family). Then, there are others who do not, because they cannot afford the pay cut (many a night nurse would love to work days, but cannot afford to lose that differential).

    And, as many have already said, the 'cushy' jobs are cushy because the nurses are seasoned enough to know how to do the job. Jobs that a new nurse could never handle, nor would be hired to without significant experience.

  • Sep 24

    Quote from Aliens05
    Guess i dont remember asking for any opinions on an easy job...low stress doesnt mean easy....
    Essentially, these terms are interchangeable for many of us seasoned nurses. I imagine they may not always be, but if a job is low stress, it is easier for one to get up every day and do it. However, some people just don't stress as easy as others; their job/specialty may be difficult, but they do not stress over it. When I worked in Peds Oncology, it was a difficult job; I did not find it stressful. I am a Professor now, and I find it incredibly stressful (while many would not consider what I do hard, because many think we do nothing ). But the stress surrounding my workplace has made me really dislike what I do.

    I know you are a student, but how far along are you? Have you observed the nurses you encounter in clinicals? What is your perception of what they do, and do you find it to be stressful?

    Also, I wonder how old you might be (roughly). Are you beginning your adulthood, and is nursing your first career? I am well into my nursing career (20+ years) and I feel the way the Commuter does (as per your paraphrasing). But again, I've been at this for more than half my life now. I'm tired. When was a new, young nurse, I was up for the challenge, wanting to work where the action was. I hate generalizing about generations (because not all fall into that category), but if you are at the beginning of your professional life, you are not going to realistically achieve that balance, while making a ton of money. You need to put in your dues (this is true in any profession you choose). While no one wants stress, you should want to get out there and be the best nurse you could be. With almost every promotion, raise up the clinical ladder an increase in salary, comes and increase in responsibility. If a Master's or Doctoral degree is required, more is required of the position (and in some cases, there is no significant increase in salary). There are many nurses out there who have given up higher paying jobs as a trade off to a more manageable lifestyle (either for their own mental being, or to balance working and having a family). Then, there are others who do not, because they cannot afford the pay cut (many a night nurse would love to work days, but cannot afford to lose that differential).

    And, as many have already said, the 'cushy' jobs are cushy because the nurses are seasoned enough to know how to do the job. Jobs that a new nurse could never handle, nor would be hired to without significant experience.

  • Sep 23

    Quote from Aliens05
    Guess i dont remember asking for any opinions on an easy job...low stress doesnt mean easy....
    Essentially, these terms are interchangeable for many of us seasoned nurses. I imagine they may not always be, but if a job is low stress, it is easier for one to get up every day and do it. However, some people just don't stress as easy as others; their job/specialty may be difficult, but they do not stress over it. When I worked in Peds Oncology, it was a difficult job; I did not find it stressful. I am a Professor now, and I find it incredibly stressful (while many would not consider what I do hard, because many think we do nothing ). But the stress surrounding my workplace has made me really dislike what I do.

    I know you are a student, but how far along are you? Have you observed the nurses you encounter in clinicals? What is your perception of what they do, and do you find it to be stressful?

    Also, I wonder how old you might be (roughly). Are you beginning your adulthood, and is nursing your first career? I am well into my nursing career (20+ years) and I feel the way the Commuter does (as per your paraphrasing). But again, I've been at this for more than half my life now. I'm tired. When was a new, young nurse, I was up for the challenge, wanting to work where the action was. I hate generalizing about generations (because not all fall into that category), but if you are at the beginning of your professional life, you are not going to realistically achieve that balance, while making a ton of money. You need to put in your dues (this is true in any profession you choose). While no one wants stress, you should want to get out there and be the best nurse you could be. With almost every promotion, raise up the clinical ladder an increase in salary, comes and increase in responsibility. If a Master's or Doctoral degree is required, more is required of the position (and in some cases, there is no significant increase in salary). There are many nurses out there who have given up higher paying jobs as a trade off to a more manageable lifestyle (either for their own mental being, or to balance working and having a family). Then, there are others who do not, because they cannot afford the pay cut (many a night nurse would love to work days, but cannot afford to lose that differential).

    And, as many have already said, the 'cushy' jobs are cushy because the nurses are seasoned enough to know how to do the job. Jobs that a new nurse could never handle, nor would be hired to without significant experience.

  • Sep 23

    Quote from Aliens05
    Guess i dont remember asking for any opinions on an easy job...low stress doesnt mean easy....
    Essentially, these terms are interchangeable for many of us seasoned nurses. I imagine they may not always be, but if a job is low stress, it is easier for one to get up every day and do it. However, some people just don't stress as easy as others; their job/specialty may be difficult, but they do not stress over it. When I worked in Peds Oncology, it was a difficult job; I did not find it stressful. I am a Professor now, and I find it incredibly stressful (while many would not consider what I do hard, because many think we do nothing ). But the stress surrounding my workplace has made me really dislike what I do.

    I know you are a student, but how far along are you? Have you observed the nurses you encounter in clinicals? What is your perception of what they do, and do you find it to be stressful?

    Also, I wonder how old you might be (roughly). Are you beginning your adulthood, and is nursing your first career? I am well into my nursing career (20+ years) and I feel the way the Commuter does (as per your paraphrasing). But again, I've been at this for more than half my life now. I'm tired. When was a new, young nurse, I was up for the challenge, wanting to work where the action was. I hate generalizing about generations (because not all fall into that category), but if you are at the beginning of your professional life, you are not going to realistically achieve that balance, while making a ton of money. You need to put in your dues (this is true in any profession you choose). While no one wants stress, you should want to get out there and be the best nurse you could be. With almost every promotion, raise up the clinical ladder an increase in salary, comes and increase in responsibility. If a Master's or Doctoral degree is required, more is required of the position (and in some cases, there is no significant increase in salary). There are many nurses out there who have given up higher paying jobs as a trade off to a more manageable lifestyle (either for their own mental being, or to balance working and having a family). Then, there are others who do not, because they cannot afford the pay cut (many a night nurse would love to work days, but cannot afford to lose that differential).

    And, as many have already said, the 'cushy' jobs are cushy because the nurses are seasoned enough to know how to do the job. Jobs that a new nurse could never handle, nor would be hired to without significant experience.

  • Sep 22

    Quote from Seas
    I wonder how someone with autism could be a nurse.
    I know I won't be popular in this thread, but I was thinking the same thing. I know there are varying degrees of autism, as well as different types. So much of what we do is dependent on picking up verbal cues (assessment). Also, proprioception issues could become an issue in practice.

  • Sep 10

    I concur with HouTx. And just to clarify, 'clinicals' are not really clinicals in an Ed program. If you want to focus on academia, you would be student-teaching, which would likely include following a professor during his/her clinical rotations with their own students. If you are interested in Staff Ed, you would follow an educator in his/her clinical setting. Those were the options my program (not online) offered as their practicum. Any school that did not require a practicum would out you at a disadvantage for job placement in the future. On the bright side, when I had to do my practicum, the hours were very doable. It is nowhere near the requirements for undergrad or NP. And many schools (that you would potentially be doing student teaching for) are very flexible (many options for day, evening, maybe even weekend clinicals/lectures). You won't be there every hour that the students are.

  • Sep 8

    Bad mom here: last year my daughter was carrying around an expired inhaler, needed it, used it, didn't get (enough) relief, one to the nurse, and I got reamed by the nurse! She is in HS, has orders to carry her own, and barely ever needs it! So I have to say, there's something to be said for the nurse having full control of this stuff. I have also worked as a camp nurse, so I have been on the other side of this. You'd think it would have made me more cognizant of this as a parent: NOPE.

    I have to say, I applaud you guys for having to deal with the likes of me (and other moms).

  • Sep 8

    Bad mom here: last year my daughter was carrying around an expired inhaler, needed it, used it, didn't get (enough) relief, one to the nurse, and I got reamed by the nurse! She is in HS, has orders to carry her own, and barely ever needs it! So I have to say, there's something to be said for the nurse having full control of this stuff. I have also worked as a camp nurse, so I have been on the other side of this. You'd think it would have made me more cognizant of this as a parent: NOPE.

    I have to say, I applaud you guys for having to deal with the likes of me (and other moms).

  • Sep 8

    Bad mom here: last year my daughter was carrying around an expired inhaler, needed it, used it, didn't get (enough) relief, one to the nurse, and I got reamed by the nurse! She is in HS, has orders to carry her own, and barely ever needs it! So I have to say, there's something to be said for the nurse having full control of this stuff. I have also worked as a camp nurse, so I have been on the other side of this. You'd think it would have made me more cognizant of this as a parent: NOPE.

    I have to say, I applaud you guys for having to deal with the likes of me (and other moms).

  • Sep 7

    Bad mom here: last year my daughter was carrying around an expired inhaler, needed it, used it, didn't get (enough) relief, one to the nurse, and I got reamed by the nurse! She is in HS, has orders to carry her own, and barely ever needs it! So I have to say, there's something to be said for the nurse having full control of this stuff. I have also worked as a camp nurse, so I have been on the other side of this. You'd think it would have made me more cognizant of this as a parent: NOPE.

    I have to say, I applaud you guys for having to deal with the likes of me (and other moms).

  • Sep 7

    Bad mom here: last year my daughter was carrying around an expired inhaler, needed it, used it, didn't get (enough) relief, one to the nurse, and I got reamed by the nurse! She is in HS, has orders to carry her own, and barely ever needs it! So I have to say, there's something to be said for the nurse having full control of this stuff. I have also worked as a camp nurse, so I have been on the other side of this. You'd think it would have made me more cognizant of this as a parent: NOPE.

    I have to say, I applaud you guys for having to deal with the likes of me (and other moms).

  • Sep 6

    Quote from CardiacDork
    I think you're the one that wanted to be an ICU nurse.


    Boy, you're in for a ride!


    Break out the wipes, ladies. We're getting a GI bleed .... Smell that sweet metal aroma? That's a GI bleed.... Nothing like the smell of sweet iron to wake you up at 6AM
    Every ICU nurse I know cleans their own patient. They provide total care for their patients, much more so than floor nurses. So yeah, poop definitely depends on the specialty you're in.

  • Sep 6

    Bad mom here: last year my daughter was carrying around an expired inhaler, needed it, used it, didn't get (enough) relief, one to the nurse, and I got reamed by the nurse! She is in HS, has orders to carry her own, and barely ever needs it! So I have to say, there's something to be said for the nurse having full control of this stuff. I have also worked as a camp nurse, so I have been on the other side of this. You'd think it would have made me more cognizant of this as a parent: NOPE.

    I have to say, I applaud you guys for having to deal with the likes of me (and other moms).

  • Sep 3

    Bad mom here: last year my daughter was carrying around an expired inhaler, needed it, used it, didn't get (enough) relief, one to the nurse, and I got reamed by the nurse! She is in HS, has orders to carry her own, and barely ever needs it! So I have to say, there's something to be said for the nurse having full control of this stuff. I have also worked as a camp nurse, so I have been on the other side of this. You'd think it would have made me more cognizant of this as a parent: NOPE.

    I have to say, I applaud you guys for having to deal with the likes of me (and other moms).


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