Latest Likes For Chaya

Latest Likes For Chaya

Chaya 7,085 Views

Joined Mar 5, '03 - from 'Bosstown metro area'. He has '15' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Rehab, Med Surg, Home Care'. Posts: 1,119 (19% Liked) Likes: 487

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  • Sep 19

    I have heard "picking" described as a archtypical end-of-life behavior and have seen it on occasion in pts that were getting close (ie-weeks to days).

  • Sep 19

    I became a nurse at 50. For me, it was easier to study than it would have been in my 20's because I was steadier; more focused and less distractable in general than when I was younger. I found I was better able to handle it emotionally after a lifetime of working in a variety of positions with coworkers having a wide range in temperment and personalities. I had also seen and weathered many life events and crisises in my life and those of family members and close friends and I came to believe that nursing was a good fit for me in terms of skills and outlook at this point in my life. Physically, it was more endurance than brute strength; although I did work with many obese patients that required extensive assistance with personal care we were well trained in body mechanics, had mechanical lifts and followed a strict policy of having 2 or more caregivers assisting with transferring, boosts, etc. I also had to become used to 12 hour shifts (but found working fewer days less stressful); had to invest in really good orthotic arch supports and shoes, and keep healthy.
    Good luck if you do make the decision to go ahead; it can be crazy at times but I've found it very satisfying-and never boring!

  • Sep 19

    I became a nurse at 50. For me, it was easier to study than it would have been in my 20's because I was steadier; more focused and less distractable in general than when I was younger. I found I was better able to handle it emotionally after a lifetime of working in a variety of positions with coworkers having a wide range in temperment and personalities. I had also seen and weathered many life events and crisises in my life and those of family members and close friends and I came to believe that nursing was a good fit for me in terms of skills and outlook at this point in my life. Physically, it was more endurance than brute strength; although I did work with many obese patients that required extensive assistance with personal care we were well trained in body mechanics, had mechanical lifts and followed a strict policy of having 2 or more caregivers assisting with transferring, boosts, etc. I also had to become used to 12 hour shifts (but found working fewer days less stressful); had to invest in really good orthotic arch supports and shoes, and keep healthy.
    Good luck if you do make the decision to go ahead; it can be crazy at times but I've found it very satisfying-and never boring!

  • Sep 17

    I became a nurse at 50. For me, it was easier to study than it would have been in my 20's because I was steadier; more focused and less distractable in general than when I was younger. I found I was better able to handle it emotionally after a lifetime of working in a variety of positions with coworkers having a wide range in temperment and personalities. I had also seen and weathered many life events and crisises in my life and those of family members and close friends and I came to believe that nursing was a good fit for me in terms of skills and outlook at this point in my life. Physically, it was more endurance than brute strength; although I did work with many obese patients that required extensive assistance with personal care we were well trained in body mechanics, had mechanical lifts and followed a strict policy of having 2 or more caregivers assisting with transferring, boosts, etc. I also had to become used to 12 hour shifts (but found working fewer days less stressful); had to invest in really good orthotic arch supports and shoes, and keep healthy.
    Good luck if you do make the decision to go ahead; it can be crazy at times but I've found it very satisfying-and never boring!

  • Sep 16

    Now that I am out of school, I recognize your singling out of me and belittlement for what it was, ie: bullying. Whether coming from a co-worker or doctor, or from an instructor who should be above this, I now call it by its rightful name.
    Your being tough on me and having high expectations might have made me a better nurse; your bullying did not. If you did not have the resources to find alternative ways of teaching students without intimidation you may be in the wrong profession; there is no justification for bullying-ever.
    I can say the scars you left did teach me how NOT to interact with others I have been privelged to teach or mentor. I have never forgotten how inadequate it made me feel.

  • Sep 15

    I became a nurse at 50. For me, it was easier to study than it would have been in my 20's because I was steadier; more focused and less distractable in general than when I was younger. I found I was better able to handle it emotionally after a lifetime of working in a variety of positions with coworkers having a wide range in temperment and personalities. I had also seen and weathered many life events and crisises in my life and those of family members and close friends and I came to believe that nursing was a good fit for me in terms of skills and outlook at this point in my life. Physically, it was more endurance than brute strength; although I did work with many obese patients that required extensive assistance with personal care we were well trained in body mechanics, had mechanical lifts and followed a strict policy of having 2 or more caregivers assisting with transferring, boosts, etc. I also had to become used to 12 hour shifts (but found working fewer days less stressful); had to invest in really good orthotic arch supports and shoes, and keep healthy.
    Good luck if you do make the decision to go ahead; it can be crazy at times but I've found it very satisfying-and never boring!

  • Sep 15

    I became a nurse at 50. For me, it was easier to study than it would have been in my 20's because I was steadier; more focused and less distractable in general than when I was younger. I found I was better able to handle it emotionally after a lifetime of working in a variety of positions with coworkers having a wide range in temperment and personalities. I had also seen and weathered many life events and crisises in my life and those of family members and close friends and I came to believe that nursing was a good fit for me in terms of skills and outlook at this point in my life. Physically, it was more endurance than brute strength; although I did work with many obese patients that required extensive assistance with personal care we were well trained in body mechanics, had mechanical lifts and followed a strict policy of having 2 or more caregivers assisting with transferring, boosts, etc. I also had to become used to 12 hour shifts (but found working fewer days less stressful); had to invest in really good orthotic arch supports and shoes, and keep healthy.
    Good luck if you do make the decision to go ahead; it can be crazy at times but I've found it very satisfying-and never boring!

  • Sep 15

    I became a nurse at 50. For me, it was easier to study than it would have been in my 20's because I was steadier; more focused and less distractable in general than when I was younger. I found I was better able to handle it emotionally after a lifetime of working in a variety of positions with coworkers having a wide range in temperment and personalities. I had also seen and weathered many life events and crisises in my life and those of family members and close friends and I came to believe that nursing was a good fit for me in terms of skills and outlook at this point in my life. Physically, it was more endurance than brute strength; although I did work with many obese patients that required extensive assistance with personal care we were well trained in body mechanics, had mechanical lifts and followed a strict policy of having 2 or more caregivers assisting with transferring, boosts, etc. I also had to become used to 12 hour shifts (but found working fewer days less stressful); had to invest in really good orthotic arch supports and shoes, and keep healthy.
    Good luck if you do make the decision to go ahead; it can be crazy at times but I've found it very satisfying-and never boring!

  • Aug 6

    Quote from BuckyBadgerRN
    Who would use a place that fired them as a reference?
    Every application I've ever completed has specifically required the names of my supervisor and/or person I worked directly under for each position I've held, independently from names you would choose to use as references.
    Whether an applicant has only ever held the one position and was fired during orientation or does not want to list one of a number of positions, omitting a job is a huge red flag. Being proactive about clarifying your specific situation is really your only chance to demonstrate owning responsibility for any action on your part that led to you leaving that position.

  • Aug 4

    Quote from BuckyBadgerRN
    Who would use a place that fired them as a reference?
    Every application I've ever completed has specifically required the names of my supervisor and/or person I worked directly under for each position I've held, independently from names you would choose to use as references.
    Whether an applicant has only ever held the one position and was fired during orientation or does not want to list one of a number of positions, omitting a job is a huge red flag. Being proactive about clarifying your specific situation is really your only chance to demonstrate owning responsibility for any action on your part that led to you leaving that position.

  • Aug 4

    Quote from BuckyBadgerRN
    Who would use a place that fired them as a reference?
    Every application I've ever completed has specifically required the names of my supervisor and/or person I worked directly under for each position I've held, independently from names you would choose to use as references.
    Whether an applicant has only ever held the one position and was fired during orientation or does not want to list one of a number of positions, omitting a job is a huge red flag. Being proactive about clarifying your specific situation is really your only chance to demonstrate owning responsibility for any action on your part that led to you leaving that position.

  • Aug 4

    Quote from BuckyBadgerRN
    Who would use a place that fired them as a reference?
    Every application I've ever completed has specifically required the names of my supervisor and/or person I worked directly under for each position I've held, independently from names you would choose to use as references.
    Whether an applicant has only ever held the one position and was fired during orientation or does not want to list one of a number of positions, omitting a job is a huge red flag. Being proactive about clarifying your specific situation is really your only chance to demonstrate owning responsibility for any action on your part that led to you leaving that position.

  • Aug 4

    Quote from BuckyBadgerRN
    Who would use a place that fired them as a reference?
    Every application I've ever completed has specifically required the names of my supervisor and/or person I worked directly under for each position I've held, independently from names you would choose to use as references.
    Whether an applicant has only ever held the one position and was fired during orientation or does not want to list one of a number of positions, omitting a job is a huge red flag. Being proactive about clarifying your specific situation is really your only chance to demonstrate owning responsibility for any action on your part that led to you leaving that position.

  • Jun 28

    "If it wasn't written down, it wasn't done". (I'm guessing you've heard this a time or two). I don't know about your nursing curriculum, but mine did not include psychic divination of patient care delivered on previous shifts but not recorded. You had no way to know what doses were actually given; plus to further complicate the issue, future doses of warfarin would be based on how well the assumedly correct dose regulated coagulation. Even if you had been able to verify that the actual dose being given differed from the recorded dose, this is a med discrepancy and your only safe option was the one you chose, to present the situation with as much info as you could obtain to the covering MD for evaluation (not in your scope of practice as an RN.

  • Jun 28

    "If it wasn't written down, it wasn't done". (I'm guessing you've heard this a time or two). I don't know about your nursing curriculum, but mine did not include psychic divination of patient care delivered on previous shifts but not recorded. You had no way to know what doses were actually given; plus to further complicate the issue, future doses of warfarin would be based on how well the assumedly correct dose regulated coagulation. Even if you had been able to verify that the actual dose being given differed from the recorded dose, this is a med discrepancy and your only safe option was the one you chose, to present the situation with as much info as you could obtain to the covering MD for evaluation (not in your scope of practice as an RN.


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