Latest Comments by grace202004

grace202004 1,413 Views

Joined Nov 16, '07. Posts: 10 (40% Liked) Likes: 13

Sorted By Last Comment (Max 500)
  • 0

    My 3 week old daughter has recently been having quite a bit of intestinal trouble suggestive of reflux. The childrens GI specialist is recommending that my GP do a digital rectal exam. This is scaring me quite a bit d/t the fact that she is only 7 lbs. I am a nurse myself but baby/peds is not my patient population. Do any of you have experience with this or have seen this done. My GP assures me that it is okay to do, but I worry about perforation and also is it very painful for the little ones? GP says that the exam is done using her pinky finger. Just worrying a lot, the appt is tomorrow. Thanks in advance for your replies.

  • 0

    First thanks to all that are reading this,
    I worked a very busy shift last night. Checked two blood sugars, and gave one insulin injection through an insulin pen. This was my only contact with sharps that I am aware of. At one point during the shift I also had to go through the little trash can on my med cart. I was checking to find a medication wrapper (It was a med I later found out should have been held and I wanted to be sure I did not inadvertantly give it, which I did find I did not) While going through the trash which was mainly gloves and med wrappers, I was careful and was wearing gloves. I do not remember seeing any sharps and dont remember ever feeling a prick or anything to make me think I had been poked. Near the end of the night I was inspecting my hands as they are very dry and I am a worry wart anyway, and I found a small red dot on the soft pad of my finger on my right hand. I squeezed it and there was no blood, just a red dot that I immediately thought looked like I had been poked with a sharp. My question is would you worry about this? I know I am a worry wart and have OCD, so I worry about everything, but never having felt anything would you think it was a needlestick? I just don't know where else this little dot came from, as I don't remember ever doing it....
    Thanks in advance to all that reply.

  • 0

    First thanks to all that are reading this,
    I worked a very busy shift last night. Checked two blood sugars, and gave one insulin injection through an insulin pen. This was my only contact with sharps that I am aware of. At one point during the shift I also had to go through the little trash can on my med cart. I was checking to find a medication wrapper (It was a med I later found out should have been held and I wanted to be sure I did not inadvertantly give it, which I did find I did not) While going through the trash which was mainly gloves and med wrappers, I was careful and was wearing gloves. I do not remember seeing any sharps and dont remember ever feeling a prick or anything to make me think I had been poked. Near the end of the night I was inspecting my hands as they are very dry and I am a worry wart anyway, and I found a small red dot on the soft pad of my finger on my right hand. I squeezed it and there was no blood, just a red dot that I immediately thought looked like I had been poked with a sharp. My question is would you worry about this? I know I am a worry wart and have OCD, so I worry about everything, but never having felt anything would you think it was a needlestick? I just don't know where else this little dot came from, as I don't remember ever doing it....
    Thanks in advance to all that reply.

  • 4

    I think in your interview when you mentioned that you were willing to work as a CNA in emergencies just lends credit to your dedication and the fact that you are a team player. I also work in LTC and they know that I too will work as an aid in emergencies (though they rarely use me bc I'm an RN, and they would rather pay an LPN to do it for a lesser rate). Your intentions were good, but I really hope you are not taken advantage of because of this. The staffing your are describing is horrible and UNSAFE, and one day of orientation on each shift is also unsafe- especially with this being your first nursing job, if your DON is telling you she wants you to see "just how bad things really are"......well that is just a horrible way to represent a facilily and lets you know right there that she has no belief in the place, I would RUN RUN RUN. IF your gut is telling you this is a bad place to be, you are probably right, and I can tell you no matter how supportive management might seem when it goes down, they will throw you under the bus like nothing flat, and your license will be on the line, so please listen to your insticts..
    Wishing you the best of luck

  • 0

    Thank you so much Jan, Yes that does help a lot!!

  • 0

    Also I am not asking for medical advice, just wondering if you have seen this and what the root cause was in that situation. There is very little information available for a LOW core temp, and I am really worried, racking my brain to figure this out.
    Thanks in advance

  • 0

    As an RN primarily dealing with adult patients I feel like I am a little out of my league here and any advice from you pedi nurses would be much appreciated..

    my daughter (7 months) was running high temps up to 105.1 for several days, within this time we had been to ER twice, told once it was a virus (go home, push fluids, tylenol,motrin etc) On the second visit they found the kidney infection and gave rocephin 400mg IM, to follow up in clinic the next day and started Oral keflex) That night temps dropped to 93.0 rectal. It is NOT cold in my home, she was dressed appropriately etc. Used several warm blankets to warm her up while on the phone with ER doc, who stated just to warm her up "I think shes just cold" WELL DUH! Stated I could bring her out for eval but as long as she was acting okay (which she was, woke up fine and was smiling, being herself) just warm her with blankets and watch her. Several warm blankets, two sleepers, a hat, in bed under down comforter with husband and I and her temp rose to 96.9 where it hovered for much of the night until morning came on and she actually began to spike from the sheer amount of blankets this time. Temps normal t/o day. Seen in the clinic that day, dr states low temp is probably a fluke thing, as blood cultures from 2nd ER visit the day before had been negative, and gave another dose of IM rocephin. Call if fevers spike again. That night same thing happens, Rectal temp drops to 95.4 as i felt i caught it sooner this time, immediately began warming her as before and again only got it up to 97.0 or so, called clinic immediately next morning and was finally admitted to hospital by a different doc. stayed for three days for IV rocephin and was d/c home today. Temps at hospital dropped to lows of around 96's (r) during night or naps only. Dr felt that the temp fluctuations were getting better and not quite as low as before, and has her on oral keflex with a slightly higher dose. She is acting pretty normal except for excessive sleepyness, she is taking several naps t/o the day which i suppose could still be r/t the kidney infection, but tonight she is still dropping to around 96.7 during sleeep. My question is have any of you seen this before, and if it could possibly indicate something more serious, what tests should I ask for. Her thyroid was checked at birth and found to be normal, no cardiac abnormalities that we know of, she isnt losing weight and is developing appropriately according to her age.

  • 6

    I think certain people are more predisposed than others, and hence it is an immediate problem for them. A class I once took explained it like this. A non alcoholic's brain will see a drink think about drinking it, examine the consequences (ex. will I be driving home tonight? Will my wife be angry?) and then drink or not drink. Its like a bridge process with the the thinking in the middle being the bridge. Alcoholics loose that bridge because they are addicts. It no longer becomes a thinking process, its simply I see the drink, I need the drink so I drink it. The two sides of the brain just fuse together with no bridge in between. Hallmarks of the disease are drinking to the excess of passing out ALL THE TIME. Alcoholics can not socially drink even if they TRY TO, or want to. They will have one which will lead to another and another and so on. Alcoholics will look back and realize that there are consequences to their drinking but still they will not stop because they can't without proper help. True alcoholics continue to call themselves alcoholics even 20 years after they have quit drinking, why? Because they know that even one drink will flip that switch in their brain again and they could be right back where they started. So basically if you took the time to read all this, I think it is initially a choice to drink or not to drink, but in those that are predisposed, it very quickly turns into disease.

  • 2
    firstclass and Itshamrtym like this.

    I think if you love your job it really doesn't matter where you work, I am a new grad since December 07, and I left a med surg floor to come back to LTC where I had orginally worked as a CNA. I love it I could not have made a better decision for myself, and I do not feel that I am wasted at all. This is my niche and I feel that I am a better nurse here, than on a medsurg floor bc this is where my heart truley is. The people that I take care of are like family to me, and well I just love it here So if you like LTC and you are happy there, then I'm sure you are blessing to those that you are taking care of, and that is really what nursing is about in my opinion...Taking care of the whole person, heart, body and soul. :heartbeat



close