Latest Comments by Nat Hyland

Nat Hyland 577 Views

Joined: Sep 26, '07; Posts: 15 (33% Liked) ; Likes: 8

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  • 0

    I have worked in aged care as a carer for almost 8 years, but I'm now studying for a nursing degree (doing 2nd year). When I first started working in aged care, I felt almost the same way you do. I am quite a "soft" person in many ways - don't often stand up for myself, even if I should. But in terms of my residents - that's a different matter. If I believe that the wrong thing has been done by someone in my care - be it something just careless, or something downright dangerous - I will speak up. They are paying for a service, and as far as I'm concerned, they deserve the best service possible. That is often not easy to provide in this day and age at times, of course.

    The most important thing is that you know that you have done the right thing. It doesn't matter what anyone else thinks. I used to work with a carer who used to criticise and ostracise a number of the people she worked with (including me), while all the time physically and psychologically abusing residents. Unfortunately she had the manager wrapped around her little finger, so even when her abuse was reported by other workers, nothing was done. But I had no hesitation about reporting this carer - and she was eventually found to be working without any qualifications anyway and taken to court. She is now banned from working in aged care ever again.

    I think there is often a "power struggle" between long established nurses, and new nurses. Personally, I don't understand this, because I am the sort of person who will always help someone who needs it. I don't believe anyone should be afraid to ask for help if they need it - isn't that preferable to seriously injuring or killing a patient? You should never be afraid to speak up for the patient. If anyone wants to argue with you, give them the reason why you think what you think. It won't be on your head if something goes wrong. Oh, and another thing - write EVERYTHING DOWN. There's your proof.

    Nat.

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    Quote from justpoorfect
    We can all think of better ways to die, but we don't really get that choice, do we? What you choose for your LIFE is fine and dandy --for you.
    You obviously have little concern about how much OTHER PEOPLE may care about YOU (and need you) if this is how you think.

    Quote from justpoorfect
    I know lots of seniors that are sitting in nursing homes, neither spritely or independent...SO?
    Yes, why contribute to this through smoking related illness?

    Quote from justpoorfect
    Yes, I have watched loved ones die from smoking-related illnesses. AND I have watched them die from non-smoking-related illnesses. The end result was still the same.
    You might have had a bit longer with the smokers if they hadn't contracted smoking-related illness. Smoking has the potential to drastically shorten a person's life.

    Quote from justpoorfect
    That's a little cold. It's called paying it forward and respecting your elders.
    It may be cold, but it's a fact. Perhaps if more people realised this, it would change their attitude to smoking. I'm happy that cigarettes are heavily taxed by our government, otherwise more people could be dying. I have great respect for my elders - why would I work in aged care if I didn't? I respect them enough to help them live their lives to the full. It doesn't mean I have to respect everything they do - which applies to anyone else too.

    Nat.

  • 1
    GadgetRN71 likes this.

    Quote from justpoorfect
    Non-smokers will have to face up to the fact that they are gonna die anyway. No matter how much clean living you do, something is going to kill you too.
    That's true, but tell me, do you want to die wondering where your next breath is coming from? I can think of better ways to die.

    Quote from justpoorfect
    Tell me honestly, who here wants to spend 30 years living in a nursing home while they wait for their 105th birthday?
    I think you are making assumptions about the state of health of older citizens. I know a number of 90-somethings who are still spritely and live an independent life.

    Quote from justpoorfect
    And who cares if a lunger spends their last days pulling off the oxygen mask to smoke? Is there any point at all in forcing them to quit at that point?
    I do. Have you ever watched someone you love die slowly and painfully over 15 years from emphysema like I have? If only my grandmother hadn't started in the first place. I thank God every day that my mother stopped smoking soon after I was born.

    Quote from justpoorfect
    From the ANA Code of Ethics:
    1. The nurse, in all professional relationships, practices with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth, and uniqueness of every individual, unrestricted by considerations of social or economic status, personal attributes, or the nature of health problems.
    That doesn't mean we should accept the same fate for ourselves as nurses. Knowledge is power.

    Quote from justpoorfect
    Someone needs to care for the ugly wrinkled yellow people too, even if they knew better as nurses.
    Unfortunately this is true - regardless of the cost to the person concerned, and society in general. If only there were fewer smokers, maybe everyone's health insurance would cost less. I object to subsidising someone else's dirty habit.

    Nat.

  • 0

    Quote from DutchgirlRN
    ewwwww!!!

    I don't use any sprays period. I know I'm inhailing the stuff and would rather not take any chances. Same with powders.

    Here here! Why risk getting this "stuff" up your nose, in your eyes, on your skin? Almost as bad as the cigarette smoke! BLAAAH! DISGUSTING! I would feel queer "deoderising" myself in such a way!

    Nat.

  • 1
    MyMysMum likes this.

    Quote from Valerie Salva
    carry small bottles of Febreeze with them. After they smoke, they spray themselves with it, chew mint gum and wash their hands.

    I do appreciate it when smokers go to the effort to deodorize themselves so that they are pleasant to be near.
    Isn't this just wasting more money and time? Why would you bother? I think the smell of chewing gum and cigarette smoke together is often WORSE than the cigarette smoke on it's own. And as for the Febreeze, isn't that a furniture/carpet deoderiser? How stupid do these people feel spraying this stuff on themselves??

    Nat.

  • 0

    Quote from jackson145
    showed a perfect set of lungs. I remember them saying something to my mom about him not smoking and she was like "are you kidding me, he was a chimney!". The doc couldn't believe it.

    And this is exactly the excuse that many smokers give for either taking up the habit in the first place or not giving up - but believe me, they are the VERY LUCKY minority! Why take the risk?

    Nat.

  • 0

    In the aged care facility where I work, we have a number of staff who do the LEAST they can possibly get away with! I work with one woman who will only do the "in charge" shift, and will assign all the hardest residents to care for (ie the ones with the worst dementia) to the two other staff on the shift (who only work 4-hour and 6.5-hour shifts respectively), where she works the longest shift. This means that neither of the other two staff have their allocated break time, and are constantly running late.

    Not only this, but the morning staff often don't finish what the should, so we are forced to do their work first before we can start our own. Of course this puts us behind.

    When I do the longest shift (as I do three nights a week) I automatically help the most difficult residents first (as they take the longest), which takes the strain off both the other shifts. All the other staff love it when I am doing the longest (medication) shift with them for this reason - they have less to do.


    We are actually having an "afternoon shift" meeting next week, and I can tell you, I will be saying a few words!


    Nat.

  • 1
    MyMysMum likes this.

    I have been both a patient in hospital (at least 8 times that I can count), and work with other carers/nurses in an aged care facility who smoke. As a non-smoker, I can say there is nothing that makes me feel SICKER than having a nurse who has just been smoking either leaning over me taking observations, or sitting next to me during hand over.

    I have also found it difficult to understand why people who should have a great deal of knowledge about how the body functions, and the effects chemicals in cigarette smoke have on the body, smoke.

    I have watched two of the people I love die of illnesses that have almost certainly been caused by cigarette smoking. My dad's mum died slowly and painfully over 15 years of emphysema - believe it or not, she was in denial right up to her death that her cigarette smoking played any part (she stopped smoking 15 years before she died). My dad's dad died of lung cancer, that transformed him from an energetic, healthy man, to a weak, listless patient.

    This is not to mention the fact that being exposed to cigarette smoke gives me asthma and makes my eyes water. And do you know, I know people who are actually YOUNGER than me who smoke, but look 10 years OLDER? NO JOKE!

    It is a pointless, rediculous habit for ANYONE to have, particularly nurses!

    Nat.

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    Quote from littleredmare
    I said to her straight out, 'well, all of my patients are vip's' Rediculous. I treat all my patients the same, I don't care if you're the queen of some country or a criminal. Who am I to judge.
    I agree entirely!

    Nat.

  • 3

    I would like to know, since when was a lawyer qualified to diagnose a person as being mentally ill? And whatever happened to the notion of assisting people to regain their independence after an injury or surgery? Why should being on your own qualify a person to receive such discriminate treatment? And with no checks and balances to meet statutory requirements, what's to prevent out-and-out abuse by the supposed "guardians" (what an irony!)?

    Just disgusting! :angryfire

    Nat.

  • 0

    a nurse should still be entitled to do his or her work in a safe and correct manner. Political correctness that prevents a nurse from conducting her practice appropriately, should not be accepted.

    As a person who has had 7 operations in my 35 years, I entirely understand the embarrassment a patient may feel while certain procedures are carried out or questions are asked. However, as a personal care attendant (and nursing student) I am aware of why certain procedures must be carried out in a certain manner (for instance to avoid transfer of infection). I also realise that nurses (like doctors) have a purely objective viewpoint when it comes to treating patients (or should have). Therefore, a patient's cultural, religious, or other beliefs do not affect the way in which a patient's illness is treated. All patients should be treated equally.

    Nat.

  • 0

    I entirely understand how you feel ! I am in a similar position. I am about to go into the second year of my Division 1 (Mental Health) Nursing degree. Since I finished in early December, I have done nothing but work almost full time (I am employed as a personal care attendant in an aged care facility), 6 days a week. I gave myself a day off yesterday so I could volunteer for St Vinnie's, which I do every month.

    I have to work so much when I can because Austudy (our government student payment system) is so meagre, that I would probably starve if I didn't. It is a very difficult situation.

    The only thing that keeps me going, is the realisation that I will eventually be finished studying, and will be earning a better wage than I am at the moment. I consider it all a means to an end.

    Try to get all the assistance you can, from wherever you can, because you deserve it !

    Nat.

  • 2
    KYCNM and leslie :-D like this.

    I totally understand how this patient feels. I have had 7 surgeries in my 35 years, and one of the things I have always been afraid of is being violated by my surgeon while under anaesthetic. When I was referred to a female surgeon I was very grateful, but she has now said she is only prepared to treat paediatric patients not adults, so I have had to go back to a male surgeon. I am afraid to go under anaesthetic, but require the operations to save my life.

    Patients under general anaesthetic are extremely vulnerable to being abused. To those of you who believe the doctor's behaviour was appropriate, how would you feel if the same was done to you? I would assume that anyone who was brave enough to tattoo their genitals, would only want certain people to see it or know about it. What if the pictures that were shown to the doctors were put on the internet for all and sundry to see? Obviously not very private. Doctors take an oath when they are qualified, and this oath includes statements about respecting and preserving the person's integrity.

    Regardless of a patient's physical features, deformities, decorations or whatever, each one deserves to be treated with privacy, dignity and respect.

    Nat.

  • 0

    Yeah, Stephanie is right - they often put in extra information to trick you! I have just finished the first year of my nursing degree myself, and I don't remember getting such a complicated question as that one!

    Nat.

  • 0

    Hi Alex

    I sort of understand where you are coming from. I am currently studying for a degree in Mental Health nursing. I am 34, and have had hydrocephalus since I was 2 months old (as a result of meningitis). I also had epilepsy for a number of years (although not now) and suffer asthma occasionally. I have had many experiences of discrimination in my life, but my way of preventing it is to prove myself. I believe I am just as capable (or more so) as any other person of performing a job for which I've been trained, and find such discrimination entirely uncalled for.

    You should just keep doing what you're doing and you will reach your goal in the end.

    Nat.



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