Latest Likes For Hygiene Queen

Latest Likes For Hygiene Queen

Hygiene Queen, RN Guide 20,665 Views

Joined Sep 13, '07. Posts: 2,319 (72% Liked) Likes: 7,741

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  • May 24

    Let's see, I've sent patients out for sepsis, brain bleed, MI, fractures, pneumonia... I could go on.
    If I have an 80 year-old pt on Norvasc, metoprolol, lisinopril, Lasix, Novolog, Levemir, Nemenda, Risperdal, Ativan, Coumadin and Norco, you tell me some things I might have to worry about.
    Then I have that person who won't take their meds. Then I have to think. Maybe if I can get them to take the Risperdal, maybe I can get them in a better place to take the rest... but no... Meanwhile, I'm on the phone getting a clonidine patch because I can't have a pt, who won't take their meds, running around with a BP 180/90. Oh, I can crush 'em, but they won't take anything by mouth... which leads to issues regarding that insulin... then I get their lab results... and now I have to go do that EKG... and now I'm coordinating a cardio consult... Meanwhile, somewhere in the dark recesses of the unit, there is a pt deciding now is a good time to strip naked, streak the unit and fall in the process...
    Oh. You do not even...
    Reminds me of a song:
    "Come back, when you grow up, Giiiiirl
    'Cause you're still livin' in a paper doll world
    (Psych) ain't easy
    (Psych's) twice as tough
    So come back, Baby...
    (ba-dum!)
    When you grow up!"

  • May 24

    Quote from Been there,done that
    You are dealing with a demanding patient, family , doctor.. short staffed and no break.

    Look at it from the OTHER side of the bed.
    The patient and the family is in a life changing , crisis situation!
    They are experiencing chest pain... GI bleeding, difficulty breathing ...

    They woke up today feeling fine.... and are now dependent on your skills and empathy... to get them through their health crisis.

    It's not about us.. it's about the patient.
    I hear you and I mean this with no rudeness intended:

    I could make it more about my patient if we weren't short-staffed with no breaks!

    I agree that it's not about us-- but because it about the $$$$$ for the higher-ups, I can't make it about my patients as much as I really want to.

  • May 23

    I think I'm at most most attractive, as a nurse, when I have a poop smear on my knee from catching a naked and confused gero mid-fall. I cannot tell you how many handsome doctors have wanted to swoop me up and carry me off to the linen closet because of this.

    I'm also tired of fighting off men who think I'm a cheap date just because I wear TED hose.

    Nursing can be too sexy for it's own good.

  • May 22

    Quote from Flare
    I've noticed that the things that people want to nitpick are the little things like, well, nits. People usually don't question my judgement during something big like a seizure or a kid that's climbing the walls with pain due to a fracture.
    This is how I've been feeling lately. In fact I told my boss, "It's ridiculous! If someone is having a life-threatening emergency, oh! We run to the nurse and trust her judgement... yet my judgement is questioned over a trivial non-issue like whether or not a client can have cake?!"

    How does that work?

    I'm sorry. I'm not a school nurse, but there aren't any other elder daycare nurse peeps here We do have some similarities, so I have to crash your board once in a while.

  • May 21

    Quote from needlesmcgeeRN
    Years ago I worked in a LTCF. One morning as I was getting ready for work, I had a thought cross my mind out of nowhere: Mr. Smith died. When I got to work that morning, I found out that Mr. Smith had died. Not a ghost story, maybe...but it still gave me a chill.

    I did private duty for a lady who was a hoot. I loved taking care of her! Anyway, after tucking her into bed after our usual night together, I gave her peck on the forehead and said, "Goodbye, Marie". Her daughter gave me an odd look, but gave me a quick hug and I headed home.

    That night, I awoke from a sound sleep around 1:00 am and very abruptly thought, "Marie's in a better place now." Then I thought, "That was a weird!" I wondered for a moment, thought, "naaah" and after thinking about Marie for a bit, went back to sleep.

    The next day, Marie's daughter called me to tell me Marie had passed away. I was flabbergasted as it was unexpected. I told the daughter how I had woken up, the time and my thought. Yep... she died around 1:00am. We both had chills!

    Her daughter then told me, "You realize you said 'goodbye' to Mom instead of 'goodnight' last night". It was true and that's why she gave me that funny look! I had never said "goodbye" before.

    The only thing I can honestly figure is that with all my prior experience in taking care of the elderly and dying, somewhere in the dark recesses of my brain, I picked up something very subtle. I think that makes more sense than to think Marie would reach out to me, but who knows?

  • May 18

    I think I'm at most most attractive, as a nurse, when I have a poop smear on my knee from catching a naked and confused gero mid-fall. I cannot tell you how many handsome doctors have wanted to swoop me up and carry me off to the linen closet because of this.

    I'm also tired of fighting off men who think I'm a cheap date just because I wear TED hose.

    Nursing can be too sexy for it's own good.

  • May 18

    I think I'm at most most attractive, as a nurse, when I have a poop smear on my knee from catching a naked and confused gero mid-fall. I cannot tell you how many handsome doctors have wanted to swoop me up and carry me off to the linen closet because of this.

    I'm also tired of fighting off men who think I'm a cheap date just because I wear TED hose.

    Nursing can be too sexy for it's own good.

  • May 18

    At my old place of employment, many many years ago, the dress code was pure white. It was also rather old-fashioned. As late as 1995 or so, the nurses still wore caps and aides and nurses alike still work dresses! It was to maintain the nursing image our administrator felt his elderly and posh clientele associated with professionalism... I personally felt he harbored a bit of a secret fetish in that area, but I'll let that one go... any way...
    I was starched and ironed in my cute little dress with white tights and spotless white shoes. I was emptying an alert and oriented (and quite proper) old gal's colostomy. I had done it a million times before with no problem. She was sitting on the toilet as I emptied the colostomy into the bedpan. I set it on the floor to clean her stoma and apply a clean bag.
    She told me to be careful! Don't step in the pan!
    No problem! Never would do that, uh uh... not ME!
    Well, what do I do?
    Sure enough, I stepped on the edge of the fracture pan, flipped it, and found my cute little self and my whites dripping in muck.
    I was splashed all down my front, all down my hose and into my pretty white shoes.
    The pt was mortified and I felt positively stupid.
    I calmed stood there (I ALWAYS remain calm... coworkers find that very amusing) and cooly assessed my uniform. I slowly say, "Well, Violet, I did it."
    She burst out laughing at me.
    I finished her up (what else can you do?) and proceeded to get a coworker to go to laundry to find me some donated clothes.
    I had to wear double-knit polyester white old lady pants (quite embarrassing for a fashion-conscious 19 year-old gal), bootie socks and 2 hospital gowns. I looked totally stupid.
    Everyone had a good laugh and the other aides said I was their new confused patient.
    I still had to to put patients to bed and they all wanted to know why I was dressed so funny.
    Aaah, it was humbling!

  • May 18

    Have you spoken with your clinical instructor?
    What has she/he told you about what you need to work on?
    Concentrate on those things and be positive.
    The only thing you can do is to make sure you know your stuff and understand it...
    And show some confidence (which may require you to hone your acting skills).

    I'm sure you're not "stupid" and I can't possibly know about your competence or suitability for nursing, but I can tell you this:

    If you really want this, you will fight very hard for it and do what you need to do to pass.
    I have been amazed at what I have been able to do when I see the threat of all my hard work going down the drain!

    Good luck and don't give up

  • May 18

    Have you spoken with your clinical instructor?
    What has she/he told you about what you need to work on?
    Concentrate on those things and be positive.
    The only thing you can do is to make sure you know your stuff and understand it...
    And show some confidence (which may require you to hone your acting skills).

    I'm sure you're not "stupid" and I can't possibly know about your competence or suitability for nursing, but I can tell you this:

    If you really want this, you will fight very hard for it and do what you need to do to pass.
    I have been amazed at what I have been able to do when I see the threat of all my hard work going down the drain!

    Good luck and don't give up

  • May 17

    Quote from needlesmcgeeRN
    Years ago I worked in a LTCF. One morning as I was getting ready for work, I had a thought cross my mind out of nowhere: Mr. Smith died. When I got to work that morning, I found out that Mr. Smith had died. Not a ghost story, maybe...but it still gave me a chill.

    I did private duty for a lady who was a hoot. I loved taking care of her! Anyway, after tucking her into bed after our usual night together, I gave her peck on the forehead and said, "Goodbye, Marie". Her daughter gave me an odd look, but gave me a quick hug and I headed home.

    That night, I awoke from a sound sleep around 1:00 am and very abruptly thought, "Marie's in a better place now." Then I thought, "That was a weird!" I wondered for a moment, thought, "naaah" and after thinking about Marie for a bit, went back to sleep.

    The next day, Marie's daughter called me to tell me Marie had passed away. I was flabbergasted as it was unexpected. I told the daughter how I had woken up, the time and my thought. Yep... she died around 1:00am. We both had chills!

    Her daughter then told me, "You realize you said 'goodbye' to Mom instead of 'goodnight' last night". It was true and that's why she gave me that funny look! I had never said "goodbye" before.

    The only thing I can honestly figure is that with all my prior experience in taking care of the elderly and dying, somewhere in the dark recesses of my brain, I picked up something very subtle. I think that makes more sense than to think Marie would reach out to me, but who knows?

  • May 17

    That must have been a terrible shift to have compelled you to do that. I hurt for you because I know I have been in the position of being berated constantly by patients. After awhile, you do feel like you are going to lose your mind. You will want to do anything just to get them to shut up!

    May I ask how they found out you gave the patient Benadryl without an order? Did you try to get an order afterward to get the doc to cover?

    It sounds like you snapped and threw your give-a-damns to the wind.

    At least you're not trying to justify it with a million excuses... and I sure as hell hope we don't get a bunch of holier-than-thous coming on here and beating you up... you've been punished enough.

  • May 16

    Elderly daycare.
    Little to no stress.
    I love it and it's fun...
    Wish I could do it full time!!

  • May 16

    That must have been a terrible shift to have compelled you to do that. I hurt for you because I know I have been in the position of being berated constantly by patients. After awhile, you do feel like you are going to lose your mind. You will want to do anything just to get them to shut up!

    May I ask how they found out you gave the patient Benadryl without an order? Did you try to get an order afterward to get the doc to cover?

    It sounds like you snapped and threw your give-a-damns to the wind.

    At least you're not trying to justify it with a million excuses... and I sure as hell hope we don't get a bunch of holier-than-thous coming on here and beating you up... you've been punished enough.

  • May 16

    I think I'm at most most attractive, as a nurse, when I have a poop smear on my knee from catching a naked and confused gero mid-fall. I cannot tell you how many handsome doctors have wanted to swoop me up and carry me off to the linen closet because of this.

    I'm also tired of fighting off men who think I'm a cheap date just because I wear TED hose.

    Nursing can be too sexy for it's own good.


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