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Hygiene Queen, RN Guide 24,408 Views

Joined Sep 13, '07. Posts: 2,369 (72% Liked) Likes: 8,031

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  • Jan 18

    Oh, hands down, Dollar General.

    You will be worked like a dog for minimum wage, no benefits and treated like dirt.

    Now, I loved unloading the truck. I love a little mindless physical labor... burns calories but working the cash register was bogus!!!

    I got stuck on the register because I was articulate, polite and could do math when the register went all to hell. Screwed myself because people can be nasty peices of work.

    I had a "lady" threaten to come behind the counter and kick my ***.
    I had an old man throw batteries at me and another customer (who smelled like booze, mold, sweat and urine... and looked just as good) make lewd comments.

    Loved the time all the other employees left me there alone to go next door to the pub! I had a line wending its way through and back around BFE. When a customer complained, I apologized and told her she could find my coworkers next door. People left and no one left in the line blamed me. Minimum wage was not enough money to keep me from being so honest. At least I was gracious when I said it, lol.

    We were in a seedy part of town. So much shoplifting! We had a huge group that would come in together and steal. No way we were going to confront those guys. We just let 'em go.

    When I got my job in behavioral health, I ran as fast as I could. Thank god, I just missed being stuck there during the holiday season!

    Soooo many bad stories from that place, but that's it in a mutshell.

    I may put up with a lot of crap in behavioral health, but that place gave me a nursing degree for practically free... and I'm paid MUCH better.

  • Jan 13

    This thread makes me so mad!

    I'm just angered by these facilities. I'm sure it probably markets itself with photographs of charming, smiling, high-functioning elderly people being hugged by their charming, smiling, completely satisfied daughters. They probably boast about how each and every resident is unique with a story and how they strive to take that into consideration to provide the best gosh-darn care ever!!!

    But they don't. They don't care what anybody's story is or what their unique needs are. They only care about filling the beds. Safety and care be damned.

    So now you have Cmtz108 coming in there, green as peas, trying to figure out what the hell she is supposed to do. She is so new that it probably didn't strike her as funny that she was responsible for 15 moderate to severe dementia patients alone. Anybody who know their dementia patients knows that this is asking for trouble. Toileting issues aside, but what about the behavioral issues that bound to happen sooner or later? Where's Cmtz108's help then?

    Cmtz108, I'm very curious... have you reported your concerns? What do you plan to do?

  • Jan 13

    I am willing to bet dollars to donuts that, should that resident have a fall-- or is injured in any way, while you are attempting to transfer them yourself, The Big Shots at that facility will throw you under the bus. I'm guessing this is an assisted living facility? No hoyers or other staff? Sounds like the level of care is not one conducive to the care of this resident. Either The Big Shots are not aware this resident isn't a fit anymore, or are blatantly turning a blind eye because, ka-ching, a filled bed (even an inappropriately filled one) is $$$$$$.

    Protect yourself. Do not transfer this resident alone! And this place doesn't just need "another CNA"... they need to have this resident in an appropriate level of care with the appropriate equipment. If you needed 3 aides, then this resident likely needs some type of lift. You also mentioned that this resident "stopped being able to walk". Has this been reported? It needs to be reported and a change in the plan of care (and the level of care) needs to be made. If They know and don't care, find a better place to work, if at all possible.

  • Jan 12

    I just made an error this past weekend. I was mortified. I was ashamed. My assignment was chaotic and, yes, we were understaffed... this, in turn, made me angry.

    HOWEVER, I made the mistake and I owned it. I notified the charge, doctors and others who needed to be aware. I monitored my patient.

    My mistake was an easy mistake to make and, thankfully, caused no harm. Still, any mistake is serious and shouldn't be minimized. I could have just as easily made a dangerous one.

    Med errors happen to everyone at some point. Doing the right thing afterward is important. This includes assessing the situation and what went wrong... so you don't do it again.

    You are not alone... not by a long shot.

  • Jan 11

    I just made an error this past weekend. I was mortified. I was ashamed. My assignment was chaotic and, yes, we were understaffed... this, in turn, made me angry.

    HOWEVER, I made the mistake and I owned it. I notified the charge, doctors and others who needed to be aware. I monitored my patient.

    My mistake was an easy mistake to make and, thankfully, caused no harm. Still, any mistake is serious and shouldn't be minimized. I could have just as easily made a dangerous one.

    Med errors happen to everyone at some point. Doing the right thing afterward is important. This includes assessing the situation and what went wrong... so you don't do it again.

    You are not alone... not by a long shot.

  • Jan 10

    Let's see, I've sent patients out for sepsis, brain bleed, MI, fractures, pneumonia... I could go on.
    If I have an 80 year-old pt on Norvasc, metoprolol, lisinopril, Lasix, Novolog, Levemir, Nemenda, Risperdal, Ativan, Coumadin and Norco, you tell me some things I might have to worry about.
    Then I have that person who won't take their meds. Then I have to think. Maybe if I can get them to take the Risperdal, maybe I can get them in a better place to take the rest... but no... Meanwhile, I'm on the phone getting a clonidine patch because I can't have a pt, who won't take their meds, running around with a BP 180/90. Oh, I can crush 'em, but they won't take anything by mouth... which leads to issues regarding that insulin... then I get their lab results... and now I have to go do that EKG... and now I'm coordinating a cardio consult... Meanwhile, somewhere in the dark recesses of the unit, there is a pt deciding now is a good time to strip naked, streak the unit and fall in the process...
    Oh. You do not even...
    Reminds me of a song:
    "Come back, when you grow up, Giiiiirl
    'Cause you're still livin' in a paper doll world
    (Psych) ain't easy
    (Psych's) twice as tough
    So come back, Baby...
    (ba-dum!)
    When you grow up!"

  • Jan 10

    You know you're a psych nurse:

    when you find yourself engaging in bizarre conversations like they're perfectly normal.

    Example: Your patient tells you Dolly Parton comes into her room at night and stuffs her full of straw... and you bat not a single eyelash. It's just another day.

  • Jan 10

    I just made an error this past weekend. I was mortified. I was ashamed. My assignment was chaotic and, yes, we were understaffed... this, in turn, made me angry.

    HOWEVER, I made the mistake and I owned it. I notified the charge, doctors and others who needed to be aware. I monitored my patient.

    My mistake was an easy mistake to make and, thankfully, caused no harm. Still, any mistake is serious and shouldn't be minimized. I could have just as easily made a dangerous one.

    Med errors happen to everyone at some point. Doing the right thing afterward is important. This includes assessing the situation and what went wrong... so you don't do it again.

    You are not alone... not by a long shot.

  • Jan 10

    I just made an error this past weekend. I was mortified. I was ashamed. My assignment was chaotic and, yes, we were understaffed... this, in turn, made me angry.

    HOWEVER, I made the mistake and I owned it. I notified the charge, doctors and others who needed to be aware. I monitored my patient.

    My mistake was an easy mistake to make and, thankfully, caused no harm. Still, any mistake is serious and shouldn't be minimized. I could have just as easily made a dangerous one.

    Med errors happen to everyone at some point. Doing the right thing afterward is important. This includes assessing the situation and what went wrong... so you don't do it again.

    You are not alone... not by a long shot.

  • Jan 9

    I just made an error this past weekend. I was mortified. I was ashamed. My assignment was chaotic and, yes, we were understaffed... this, in turn, made me angry.

    HOWEVER, I made the mistake and I owned it. I notified the charge, doctors and others who needed to be aware. I monitored my patient.

    My mistake was an easy mistake to make and, thankfully, caused no harm. Still, any mistake is serious and shouldn't be minimized. I could have just as easily made a dangerous one.

    Med errors happen to everyone at some point. Doing the right thing afterward is important. This includes assessing the situation and what went wrong... so you don't do it again.

    You are not alone... not by a long shot.

  • Jan 9

    I just made an error this past weekend. I was mortified. I was ashamed. My assignment was chaotic and, yes, we were understaffed... this, in turn, made me angry.

    HOWEVER, I made the mistake and I owned it. I notified the charge, doctors and others who needed to be aware. I monitored my patient.

    My mistake was an easy mistake to make and, thankfully, caused no harm. Still, any mistake is serious and shouldn't be minimized. I could have just as easily made a dangerous one.

    Med errors happen to everyone at some point. Doing the right thing afterward is important. This includes assessing the situation and what went wrong... so you don't do it again.

    You are not alone... not by a long shot.

  • Jan 9

    I just made an error this past weekend. I was mortified. I was ashamed. My assignment was chaotic and, yes, we were understaffed... this, in turn, made me angry.

    HOWEVER, I made the mistake and I owned it. I notified the charge, doctors and others who needed to be aware. I monitored my patient.

    My mistake was an easy mistake to make and, thankfully, caused no harm. Still, any mistake is serious and shouldn't be minimized. I could have just as easily made a dangerous one.

    Med errors happen to everyone at some point. Doing the right thing afterward is important. This includes assessing the situation and what went wrong... so you don't do it again.

    You are not alone... not by a long shot.

  • Jan 5

    You know you're a psych nurse:

    when you find yourself engaging in bizarre conversations like they're perfectly normal.

    Example: Your patient tells you Dolly Parton comes into her room at night and stuffs her full of straw... and you bat not a single eyelash. It's just another day.

  • Dec 31 '16

    You know you're a psych nurse:

    when you find yourself engaging in bizarre conversations like they're perfectly normal.

    Example: Your patient tells you Dolly Parton comes into her room at night and stuffs her full of straw... and you bat not a single eyelash. It's just another day.

  • Dec 30 '16

    Quote from Chance010507
    Has anyone ever gone from a CNA to RN and missed it? How different is the relationship?
    I was a CNA for over 20 years before I became a nurse. I loved being a CNA. I often miss the hands-on care and so I do it whenever I can.

    Yes. It was nice to be able to just get the nurse when things got sketchy. It was nice to then help the nurse and just be Robin and not Batman. It was nice to go home on time!

    I filled in as a PCT last week. Thought I'd died and gone to heaven. It was a break from admissions, doctor calls, treatments, family visits and med passes that usually are fraught with niggly glitches and complications that drive me up the wall!

    I will say, I do like my paychecks better as a nurse, so there's that.


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