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Hygiene Queen, RN Guide 28,769 Views

Joined Sep 13, '07. Posts: 2,414 (73% Liked) Likes: 8,341

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  • Oct 22

    Quote from Orca
    Several come to mind. Inpatient geropsych unit in a metropolitan hospital, female patient who seemed to have her days and nights inverted, resisted being put to bed at night. Would walk the halls checking doors and looking in rooms. Found out after talking to family members that she was a retired RN who worked night shift for many years. I noticed that when she checked doors, it wasn't as if she was trying to escape the unit, but rather that she was checking to make sure that the doors were secured. If we let her sit in the nurse station for a few minutes and arrange papers, she was much happier because she believed that she was helping.
    I also worked geropsych. We had a dementia patient -- and former nurse-- who would take off running down the hall yelling, "Call the pharmacy! Call the pharmacy! I've made a med error!".

    Talk about being trapped in Hell.

  • Oct 19

    Quote from Orca
    Several come to mind. Inpatient geropsych unit in a metropolitan hospital, female patient who seemed to have her days and nights inverted, resisted being put to bed at night. Would walk the halls checking doors and looking in rooms. Found out after talking to family members that she was a retired RN who worked night shift for many years. I noticed that when she checked doors, it wasn't as if she was trying to escape the unit, but rather that she was checking to make sure that the doors were secured. If we let her sit in the nurse station for a few minutes and arrange papers, she was much happier because she believed that she was helping.
    I also worked geropsych. We had a dementia patient -- and former nurse-- who would take off running down the hall yelling, "Call the pharmacy! Call the pharmacy! I've made a med error!".

    Talk about being trapped in Hell.

  • Oct 19

    *Turds perfectly rolled up and meticulously lined up along the edge of the sink.
    *The man who dismantled the drinking fountain. He also escaped and was found at the hot dog stand.
    *Two room mates chasing each other around and around the nurses' station in their wheel chairs. They were trying to catch up with the other and kept losing the other around the bend. They were also calling out for the other... and they were not usingtheir correct names.
    *The strong man who broke the toilet off it's base and flooded the floor. His reasoning: "Those horses done run wild!"
    *The potpourri that was shaped like a pie. Said potpourri pie was found with a hunk out of it. Patient: "That pie tastes like ***!"
    *Cranky old bat and cranky old codger loved to harass each other. Both mean as cat ***. Old Bat goes to whack Old Codger with her cane... and knocked the drapes down on her head instead. Old Codger delighted.
    *Quote: "I'm 83, my mother's 83 and my grandmother's 83! Isn't that funny, honey?!"
    *Aide trying to fix paranoid old lady's TV. Patient is worried aide will electrocute herself. Very worried. Patient explodes: "Don't play with Mr. Electricity, you ****!!"

    Oh, I have waaaaaaay too many.

  • Oct 15

    Quote from nightingale4me
    And, I don't think me stating that I would stick up for myself (or others) against bullying therefore makes me a bully, but again, that's just my perception of the situation.
    Yeah, I don't think sticking up for yourself against a bully makes you a bully. This makes no sense to me.

  • Oct 15

    Quote from Orca
    Several come to mind. Inpatient geropsych unit in a metropolitan hospital, female patient who seemed to have her days and nights inverted, resisted being put to bed at night. Would walk the halls checking doors and looking in rooms. Found out after talking to family members that she was a retired RN who worked night shift for many years. I noticed that when she checked doors, it wasn't as if she was trying to escape the unit, but rather that she was checking to make sure that the doors were secured. If we let her sit in the nurse station for a few minutes and arrange papers, she was much happier because she believed that she was helping.
    I also worked geropsych. We had a dementia patient -- and former nurse-- who would take off running down the hall yelling, "Call the pharmacy! Call the pharmacy! I've made a med error!".

    Talk about being trapped in Hell.

  • Oct 10

    Quote from Orca
    Several come to mind. Inpatient geropsych unit in a metropolitan hospital, female patient who seemed to have her days and nights inverted, resisted being put to bed at night. Would walk the halls checking doors and looking in rooms. Found out after talking to family members that she was a retired RN who worked night shift for many years. I noticed that when she checked doors, it wasn't as if she was trying to escape the unit, but rather that she was checking to make sure that the doors were secured. If we let her sit in the nurse station for a few minutes and arrange papers, she was much happier because she believed that she was helping.
    I also worked geropsych. We had a dementia patient -- and former nurse-- who would take off running down the hall yelling, "Call the pharmacy! Call the pharmacy! I've made a med error!".

    Talk about being trapped in Hell.

  • Oct 9

    Quote from Horseshoe
    "It was a hot and sultry night as I approached the nursing station for my shift. Though the temperature was oppressively high as I signed in at the computer, I felt a chill at the dark and moody atmosphere oozing from every pore of the unit. This did not bode well..."
    "Suddenly, a tortured cry shook my foundations. It crumbled me to the core. It shattered my shimmies. I ran, though I ran blindly, not seeing but hearing, feeling, tasting the anguish which I knew I must quell. All my senses, but my eyesight, beckoned me to go.

    Rounding the corner, I could finally see what had called me. My eyes had opened like a defiant flower in Spring. It was a man. A very handsome man... my patient who had entrusted his life to me... and he was in pain. My heart melted, but I knew I must be strong. Somebody had to save him. I readily accepted the challenge..."

  • Oct 8

    Quote from Orca
    Several come to mind. Inpatient geropsych unit in a metropolitan hospital, female patient who seemed to have her days and nights inverted, resisted being put to bed at night. Would walk the halls checking doors and looking in rooms. Found out after talking to family members that she was a retired RN who worked night shift for many years. I noticed that when she checked doors, it wasn't as if she was trying to escape the unit, but rather that she was checking to make sure that the doors were secured. If we let her sit in the nurse station for a few minutes and arrange papers, she was much happier because she believed that she was helping.
    I also worked geropsych. We had a dementia patient -- and former nurse-- who would take off running down the hall yelling, "Call the pharmacy! Call the pharmacy! I've made a med error!".

    Talk about being trapped in Hell.

  • Oct 8

    Quote from Adri_RN
    When i was in LTC, the administrator used to like dropping by unannounced. One morning she walked in while I was in the dining room with all my residents. One of my LOLs with dementia calls me over to her table, which happened to be by the dining room entrance, as the administrator walks in. She very loudly asks "Who the hell is the uptight ***** and who invited her over to dinner?" Needless to say, the admin never showed up during meals again....
    Beautiful!
    I would have given up a whole paycheck to witness that!

  • Oct 7

    *Turds perfectly rolled up and meticulously lined up along the edge of the sink.
    *The man who dismantled the drinking fountain. He also escaped and was found at the hot dog stand.
    *Two room mates chasing each other around and around the nurses' station in their wheel chairs. They were trying to catch up with the other and kept losing the other around the bend. They were also calling out for the other... and they were not usingtheir correct names.
    *The strong man who broke the toilet off it's base and flooded the floor. His reasoning: "Those horses done run wild!"
    *The potpourri that was shaped like a pie. Said potpourri pie was found with a hunk out of it. Patient: "That pie tastes like ***!"
    *Cranky old bat and cranky old codger loved to harass each other. Both mean as cat ***. Old Bat goes to whack Old Codger with her cane... and knocked the drapes down on her head instead. Old Codger delighted.
    *Quote: "I'm 83, my mother's 83 and my grandmother's 83! Isn't that funny, honey?!"
    *Aide trying to fix paranoid old lady's TV. Patient is worried aide will electrocute herself. Very worried. Patient explodes: "Don't play with Mr. Electricity, you ****!!"

    Oh, I have waaaaaaay too many.

  • Oct 7

    I'm with you, bud.

    I don't even bother to read those things!

    I also hate stock photos of nurses smiling and holding clipboards while wearing a pristine lab coat and perfectly perfect hair. A stethoscope is neatly placed on their neck.

    Please.

  • Oct 6

    Quote from Beth1978
    You too should write a serial, lol.
    I've been waiting to see if anyone else would continue the story

  • Oct 5

    I worked in psych for a long time and I never, personally, saw anything remotely resembling abuse. I was lucky to work with some really good people and I don't think it would have been tolerated. That doesn't mean it doesn't happen, but it has not been my experience and I would not have worked there for so long if that were the case.

  • Oct 5

    I worked in psych for a long time and I never, personally, saw anything remotely resembling abuse. I was lucky to work with some really good people and I don't think it would have been tolerated. That doesn't mean it doesn't happen, but it has not been my experience and I would not have worked there for so long if that were the case.

  • Oct 3

    Try LTC. I know you said you couldn't handle it, but you'd be surprised what you can handle when you have no choice. In the meanwhile, getting a job anywhere outside of nursing (such as retail) can help pay the bills until you find another nursing job. You do what ya gotta do. I know this all too well. Good luck to you.


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