The Best Is Yet To Be | Nursing Blog - page 9

VivaLasViejas (111,866 Views) Guide

Joined Sep 6, '02 - from 'The Great Northwest'. VivaLasViejas is a Long-Term Care Surveyor and blogger extraordinaire. She has '17' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'LTC, assisted living, geriatrics, psych'. Posts: 24,585 (35% Liked) Likes: 33,368

The following are articles I have written and shared with the nursing community. If you enjoy an article please leave a comment and tell me what you think.

Ten Things I Love About Nursing

10) I get to work in the most comfortable clothing on the planet. When I was a nurse manager, I was going through the worst of my perimenopause.....in polyester and double knits, no less. Now I wear soft cotton scrubs, which are essentially pajamas with lots of pockets. Good times! 9) Sheer variety. There are so many types of nursing that it would take several lifetimes to try them all. Even in my comparatively brief career, I've worked Med/Surg, postpartum, ICU, assisted living, and... Read More →


Just For Today

Years ago, I received a greeting card containing a poem which exhorted the reader to do things he/she might not ordinarily do, "just for today". I don't recall who sent me the card or what occasion prompted her to do so, but I've never forgotten the gist of the verse, which was along the lines of "just for today, I will dress becomingly.....speak softly......behave graciously.......do something for my health that would appall me if I had to keep it up for a lifetime........not try to improve... Read More →


Tales from the ICF: Ed-EEEEEEEE!

Since so many of you have enjoyed my nursing-home stories, I thought I'd offer character studies of some of the more colorful "characters" I've had the privilege of caring for over the years. This one is about Ed, the crusty curmudgeon of "ear WAX!" fame from "Elders Say the Darnedest Things". Without revealing too many personal details, let us just say that this gentleman is one of my favorite residents, EVER. He's been on the ICF (otherwise known as intermediate care, or... Read More →


Elders Say the Darnedest Things!

As anyone who's ever worked with the elderly knows, every care facility has its "characters": the curmudgeon, the hothouse flower, the Church Lady. And the best-kept secret in the business is the hilarity that ensues whenever one of these folks offers his or her commentaries on everyday events. Take Ed, our resident Oscar the Grouch. He's a World War II vet who also worked as a train conductor; his manner is gruff, and his language is often as colorful as the Oregon Ducks cap he wears. He... Read More →


You Got to Know When to Hold 'Em

.........and when to fold 'em too. One of the few physical advantages of the over-50 body is its ability to say No to excesses---of food and drink, of stress, of too many long, hard shifts in a row. It's only when respecting those limits conflicts with the reality of nursing, where self-sacrifice is often the order of the day, that guilt rears its ugly little noggin and gives rise to the sort of discomfort I'm feeling right now. I just came off a three-day stretch of shifts from The Bad... Read More →


Ohhhh, My Aching (Blank)

I don't know who said it first, but when I was a kid I heard adults quote this line until I was heartily sick of it: "If I'd known I was going to get this old, I'd have taken better care of myself". Psssssst......hey, you! Could you loan me some Advil till payday? It never occurs to us when we're young that someday we'll be fifty years old, and that places on our bodies to which we have given little thought will begin to hurt. This is why we do stupid things, like jumping off roofs with... Read More →


It's The Grim Reaper, Charlie Brown

Ever hear that expression, "lowering the boom"? It's pretty descriptive of the way I felt tonight when my dear, sweet DON told me, ever so gently, that I might want to be prepared for lean times ahead: Our census has been dropping for weeks, and the numbers aren't going up any time in the foreseeable future; ergo, nursing hours are about to be cut. Big time. Like instead of being scheduled for four shifts per week, I might be lucky to work two. I know it's just a bit of rotten luck that... Read More →


"Mom-nesia", or, Of Pyramids and Panic

All of you nurse-moms out there will get this, and perhaps even a few of you dads. Mom-nesia, for the uninitiated, is a phenomenon that occurs whenever some medical crisis threatens your offspring, instantly rearranging your priorities and rendering you completely ineffective as a clinician. Like when your 17-year-old son falls off the top of a human pyramid, slams into an inch's worth of foam rubber, feels OK for the first few minutes, and then.........isn't. I was just leaving for my... Read More →


For Sale: Used Nurse. Dirt Cheap!

It's taken me a dozen years to get here, but I have finally decided that I'm no longer a "new" nurse. I'm not sure if it's because I was a good deal older than many of my classmates when I graduated from nursing school and found out very quickly that I was nowhere near as smart as I thought I was, or if it's merely because I'm in awe of nurses who are around my age and have practiced for many more years than I. But whatever the reason, the road to success in nursing has been a lot harder,... Read More →


"How Can You Stand It?"

If I had a nickel for every time I've had to answer that question, I'd be able to retire tomorrow. It is a question I am often asked whenever I meet new people. After the how-do-you-dos are said and the subject inevitably turns to "what do you do?", I almost always get sympathetic looks and comments on how I must be such a saint to work in a nursing home, with "all those senile old people" who are "just going to die anyway". "How can you stand it?" they want to know. "Don't you ever get... Read More →


Oops, I Did It Again: Dottie

..........I went and lost my heart to yet another hospice patient. You'd think I'd have learned my lesson after caring for my old friend in that same room and witnessing her inevitable decline and death, but nope---this one had me from "Hello". Her name is Dottie, and she is 85 pounds of trouble dressed in a white satin nightgown and an ancient pair of fuzzy pink slippers. She came to our nursing home in early April for a five-day hospice respite, and for reasons known only to her, liked it... Read More →


Life, Death, and Other Matters of Consequence

Some days, it's just not worth chewing through the restraints....... I am a seasoned long-term care nurse. I deal with life and death matters all the time. My voice is often the last one a patient hears, and my hand the last human touch he or she feels. It's OK most of the time, that's why I was built strong enough to handle the load, and for the most part I feel blessed to have been given the privilege of providing solace and comfort to a soul preparing to leave this earth. But there are... Read More →


Everything I Know About Life, I Learned From Nursing

........I've learned that nursing is a great metaphor for life. It's both rewarding and frustrating, utterly fascinating at times and dull as tombs at others; it's funny, sad, beautiful, ugly, dramatic, unglamorous........and sometimes it outright stinks. ........A little effort can go a long, long way. Investing five or ten minutes in a needy patient at the very beginning of the shift sets the tone for the entire day, and pays dividends in decreased anxiety for them (and less call-light use... Read More →


Night Nurse III: Slip-Slidin' Awaaaaaaay

Here's another Night Nurse story, if you want it. Actually, this tale begins in the early evening: a time of day when hospital life starts to wind down and all the doctors, therapists, families, and administrators head for the exits. It was a time of day when we could usually take a short break before the HS festivities ensued, with the typical flurry of toileting, meds, and wound treatments. Unfortunately for us night nurses, it was also the time of day when our environmental services... Read More →


Night Nurse II: I Tawt I Taw A Puddy-Tat!

Just when you think you've seen it all............well, that's when you realize how much there is out there that you HAVEN'T seen. Being the veteran of several years on Med/Surg, I figured that I'd encountered just about every type of patient and family. There was the 99-year-old who'd never been in a hospital in her life, and her sixteen relatives who occupied the room throughout her entire stay. The 22-year-old frequent flyer who came in at least monthly with blood sugars in the 1200s and... Read More →



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