Latest Comments by luvbeinganurse

luvbeinganurse 1,250 Views

Joined Aug 23, '02. Posts: 37 (3% Liked) Likes: 1

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    I can only say, I love nursing. Not every day is great. Some days are exhausting and mentally draining, but I wouldn't trade being a nurse for anything else. As far as being a paper/pencil pusher - well, welcome to the real world of nursing. You'll never see so much paper work as you would with other jobs. Don't go into nursing to escape paper work or you'll be VERY disappointed!

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    Penelope_Pitstop likes this.

    Imagine my surprise when I was sent to a patient's home to change his suprapubic catheter, but no one had told me he had had his penis and testicles completely removed. I hope I didn't look as off-guard as I felt! Gosh! :imbar

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    I would make sure that the family understands that their wishes do not superceed the wishes of the patient, that having a POA does not mean a thing if the patient has not been declared incompetent to make his/her own decisions. Geez! Don't get me going on this one!

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    A similar thing happened to me. An agency where I had worked contacted me by mail, personally, asking if I were looking for a job and would I be interested in coming back to work for them, since I had a great work record with them in the past. They said if I was interested to please email them. I did - and again and again. It's been over a year now, and they still have not responded. But that's okay. I love my current job and probably will stay until they kick me out!

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    I also have bilateral CTS. I work in home care and do a lot of blood draws. The most difficult part for me is when there are multiple tubes to fill - sometimes I cannot feel my fingers holding the needle, and I am afraid I will drop it. Of course, the paper work brings it on very well, too. And pulses - occasionally I have a hard time because of the numbness, so I always do apical pulses.

    However, for me, when I wear a magnetic bracelet, it really does improve the circulation quickly, and the symptoms are relieved quite a bit.

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    I would have picked B. Don't you just hate those kind of questions?

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    I work in private home care, mostly with geriatric people. I became a nurse because I wanted to be a nurse-midwife, but I ended up working with the older folks, and I wouldn't change a thing. I love my job! Every day is different. I am in peoples' homes as well as in the office, and no two days are alike.

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    Wow - I am really having to rethink my position on this. Although, for as little physical contact that I personally have with our clients, I don't think it's a problem. (My admissions are mostly for home health aides and homemaker/companions - the only nursing is usually for medication management) But I would be interested in reading those studies if anyone knows where to locate them.

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    I wear acrylic nails. I am in private homecare. Most of what I do are nursing admissions and assessment, which sometimes take up to 2 hours of paperwork in the home. I keep the nails very short, only as long as the top of my fingers, wash my hands or use alcohol hand wash CONSTANTLY, and paint them usually an opaque light color (pink or white). I wear them because my patients have to sit there for a couple hours looking at me write, observing my hands.

    Unfortunately, I am a nail biter when my nerves are bad (old habits die hard) and my nails are very weak and break very easily. I don't put the acrylic ones in my mouth. I also do a lot of venipunctures, but the nails are very short and I have never had a problem with them falling off or making holes in gloves. In fact, even taking them off is just short of excruciating torture, IMO, so they are on there to stay.

    My hospital doesn't have a policy against wearing them, but if I were working on the floor, I doubt if I would.

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    claudification instead of claudication (or is it the other way around??)

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    At my hospital, we double check insulin and blood products. Both nurses sign off on the blood products, but not the insulin. There is no rule to double check heparin, but personally I think it's a great one - wish it was one.

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    I worked as a caregiver in a private home, about 40 hours a week, mostly Friday night through Sunday. It was great because I could study as long as I wanted into the night after I had my little lady in bed - she was 97. And she also slept on and off during the day.

    The odd thing is that I was making only $7.50 an hour, but it seemed to go a lot further than my nurses' salary does! Can't quite figure that out.

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    I am also in home health, and I do it with every assessment as well. I just thought everyone did it, too! I have never seen 2 people doing it, tho.

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    You need to see a cardiologist. I had some "symptoms" for a very long time that I ignored. I went to the ER twice for heart palpitations because they were so bad that they made me feel nauseous. They put me on a monitor for an hour and sent me home saying it was only a few PACs and not to worry and to stop drinking caffeine. I felt like an idiot. I also could feel my heart beating in my throat whenever I bent over. I have been on BP meds for about 6 years and still have a hard time controlling my BP. My normal heart rate was always over 100.

    Finally, one Sunday I had an episode of bradycardia that scared me. My heart rate was in the 40's all day and I felt very light-headed. I called my MD the next day, went to see him, and he referred me to a cardiologist. But did I go? No. It was summer and I was supposed to go to NY and help my parents move. So, I did, and packed and lifted boxes, and carried all kinds of heavy things. When I went back home, I saw the cardiologist. I told him that I had had SOB for as long as I can remember, and about the bradycardic episode, also tightening in my chest frequently that I attributed to stress.

    He did some tests that showed nothing, then sent me for a treadmill stress test. I thought I was going to die. In less than 15 seconds, my heart rate was in the 180's, I couldn't breath, and my BP was soaring. They got me off the machine and I was lucky they didn't have to used the paddles one me. The next day they did a heart cath and found that I had a 100% blockage of the LDA. The only reason I wasn't dead was because somehow over time I had built up a lot of collateral circulation. They did a CABG right away, and now all of those symptoms I had ignored for such a long time are gone. I was 49 but had the symptoms for several years before the stress test.

    So all that to say this - don't wait! Go see a cardiologist!

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    Most of the time, I have not been asked foolish questions, but at one interview (and I did not get the job - didn't even want it after the interview), the nurse manager asked me, "Name the steps of the nursing process, and using them in the right order, what would you do with a patient who came in with a fever of unknown origin?" I hadn't even heard those terms since I graduated from nursing school, so I knew I was sunk right off the bat. I had a telemetry nurse friend who got a job on telemetry and in the unit at the same hospital, and she didn't have to answer any kind of questions like that during her interview. She told me she would have said, "Well, we may as well end this interview right now, because I'm not going to be able to answer that question." But I tried my best to muddle through it. I didn't hear back from her, but that was fine because I didn't want to work for her after that anyhow. SHEESH!


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