Latest Comments by caliotter3

caliotter3 74,438 Views

Joined Aug 9, '02. Posts: 36,517 (34% Liked) Likes: 32,868

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  • 0

    My friend went to the nursing department to find out why she was rejected. The "missing" transcripts were right there in her folder, on top, in their unopened envelope. How do you think she felt? She pleaded with them to no avail. That was the end of her nursing career. She was bitter afterwards. I can't see anyone not being angry. There should be some form of checks and balances for such situations.

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    Generally the W would be better, but you need to do some research. Start with your advisor at your school. Then check out the W and F policies for the schools you might want to apply to. How do each affect your general GPA? How many repeats are allowed? And so forth. Different schools have different policies and you want to make the best decision for your circumstances.

  • 0

    The only comment I have is that the relatively recent time I turned down an insulting offer, I drove away without a job. I wish they had said something at the beginning instead of allowing me to waste my time as well as theirs. I'm at the point now that I will no longer accept the lowest of wages out of desperation. Only you know how low you are willing to go, why, and for how long. It is better to value yourself, no one else will. Do your research and come to your personal set point before this happens again.

  • 3

    Yes. Start out with your volunteer work and perhaps some entries from school. As time passes, prune and replace with experience that is more nursing-related. I had a ton of prior employment. When I started as a CNA, I started to list that at first with one global entry for past experience. Once I got the first licensed nurse entry, I rearranged matters, eventually dropping the CNA and prior entries, filling those spaces with nursing jobs.

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    annefrisbe likes this.

    Most agencies allow the nurse to handle the schedule as they see fit, just as long as all necessary visits are completed when due. Very few agencies micromanage your schedule from the office, usually with no thought in mind as to what works best. That is the kind of agency probably best avoided if possible.

  • 0

    I would make a call to the nursing department of the programs that interest you and ask.

  • 0

    Quote from MunoRN
    Yes, they very well may take action against you and it's not unheard of for employers to aggressively seek reimbursement. There are even some state BONs that will suspend your license for nursing related debt, this typically applies to student loan debt but can also include breach of contract penalties.
    A judgement is collectible for a certain time period (ten years). At the end of that time period, the creditor can go back to court and have the judgement reaffirmed. And it is very common for creditors with a valid judgement to go after one's bank accounts. The money is gone before the account holder even has any idea what is going on. And all of this, including the original court case bringing about the default judgement, can take place without the defendant having an inkling. The process server commits perjury when stating that he legally served notice. All of this information can be verified by perusing the internet. You can find it in many places. How can one sleep at night, ignoring a debt, and always wondering what steps have been taken against them or where in the process, the collection of the debt might be? Creditors go after far less than $10,000. All information that can be gleaned from the internet.

  • 0

    Management typically does want to hear about any problems, much less do anything about those problems. Employees who bring problems to the attention of management are seen as THE problem and not the "problem" or those who cause the "problem". This is a general rule of thumb. If you want to remain employed, or have less stress at work, you will make the choice to turn a blind eye to a lot. Not saying this is the right way to go about one's worklife, just saying that it is a general rule of thumb.

    And yes, I have heard the party line more than once. No one is going to say that they do the opposite of policy or general common sense. That would be leaving the door wide open to litigation.

  • 1
    vintagemother likes this.

    Consumer Cellular has cheap phone plans. Used to be minimum of $10 month. Think it might be up to $15, maybe $25. Use the phone for little more than emergencies and you can be on their cheapest plan.

  • 1
    Blackcat99 likes this.

    Look for a job elsewhere and ease yourself out of there.

  • 1
    studentnursemorgan likes this.

    If you were ever let go, it would be for something you did or did not do, not because you have ADHD.

  • 0

    You can address specific questions by communicating with the Board. They will send you a letter or email with their answer. Some Boards have a special address to send these inquiries that is posted on the site. Other than that, the scope, for the most part, is described in broad terms and your facility will have its own policies in place which may be more restrictive.

  • 0

    Go onto the website of the TX Board of Registered Nursing. The steps to become an RN in TX are found there. However, anticipate that your MD schooling may not be sufficient. I have seen before statements along the line of "MD education does not equate to RN education". I don't know how this is approached in TX. Good luck.

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    Whether CNA or licensed nurse, I began to look at the job performance of those who were critical or made fun of my nursing student status. Amazingly, those who dished out the negativity were not the caregivers who were doing a good job. When I came to that realization, it became easier to dismiss their comments as not worth my time.


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