Ruby Vee's Nursing Blog - page 3

By Ruby Vee

Joined Jun 28, '02. Posts: 7,682 (62% Liked) Likes: 25,369

The following are articles I have written and shared with the nursing community. If you enjoy an article please leave a comment and tell me what you think.

CPAP: Tips for Nurses

so your patient comes into the hospital, assisted living or long term care facility with a diagnosis of sleep apnea and one of those dreaded cpap machines in tow. congratulations! your patient is more compliant than the average patient! from my (admittedly limited) experience, the majority of patients with sleep apnea have never gotten themselves a cpap machine, have it but donít know how to use it, know how to use it but wonít or use it only inconsistently. the ďreasonsĒ for their... Read More →


CPAP: Use It And Live

i work in a cardiac intensive care unit; ccu and sicu together. as an icu nurse, iím well acquainted with the correlation between untreated sleep apnea and heart disease, stroke or sudden death. and i wish i had a dollar for every patient with ďobstructive sleep apneaĒ listed as a diagnosis on their chart and no cpap with them when theyíre admitted to the icu. pauline (not her real name) came in for an mi, proceeded to have a cabg and then stroked while still in the icu. her history... Read More →


Things I've Learned This Year

hopefully, i learn new things every year -- every day even. but some are more memorable than others. here, then, is a list of the more memorable things iíve learned this year. ē there are three kinds of people: there are those who get it, and there are those who donít. the third kind are those who donít get it but think they do. the latter kind are the worst ones to deal with. just like you cannot teach anyone who already thinks they know everything, you cannot hope that those who donít get... Read More →


Mildred's Brand New Littman Stethescope

a sense of humor runs in my family. my great grandfather was well known as a great story teller -- almost everyone in the county knew willy and could repeat some of his best stories. when i was in high school, i was always running into oldsters who would say ďruby vee? youíre georgeís daughter, arenít you? i went to high school with your great grandfather and i remember him telling about the time he . . . . my grandfather was more often the subject of great stories -- he was a... Read More →


"Nurses are so Mean"

I wish I had a dollar for every post I've read claiming that "nurses are so mean," "nurses are nasty to each other," "nurses eat their young" or "my preceptor is picking on me for no good reason." And then if you add in all the nurses who are "fired for NO reason" or is hated by their co-workers because they're so much younger and more beautiful than everyone around them or just can't get along with their colleagues no matter what they do -- well, I'd be a rich woman. I could retire to Tahiti... Read More →


When I Was a New Grad . . .

this for those of you members of allnurses.com who have hinted, believed, insinuated or baldly stated that i donít remember what itís like to be a new grad, that i always thought i knew everything, that i have ever actually known everything or that nurses eat their young. believe me, if iím still around after the rough start i had, nurses donít eat their young. i remember being a new graduate -- in fact sometimes i still wake up in the middle of the night remembering something i screwed up... Read More →


A Few Simple Rules For Electrical Safety

I learned some of these rules the hard way, and others I learned through the misfortunes of others. When defibrillating a prisoner in custody, remember to remove his wrist AND ankle shackles before using the electricity. This is especially important if the prisoner is shackled to a metal bed frame. And if the respiratory therapist is leaning against the bed frame to bag the patient. If you find that you have forgotten to remove the shackles before defibrillating, please do not shout... Read More →


Security Guard with the Mostest (or How to Entertain a Little Old Lady)

i was working in ccu, taking care of an elderly woman with a fresh mi. it might have been that the moon was full, but i can't say for sure. that was the night the patient took off from the medical floor where he was de-toxing from the combination of alcohol and pain killers that made the police decide he needed to be in a hospital rather than lying on the barroom floor . . . he wandered up to the 7th floor and through the double doors that clearly stated "no admittance" and "authorized... Read More →


"That Crazy Old Lady Did It!"

When I started my first nursing job in the late 1970s, I was the very first BSN graduate hired at that hospital. They had their own School of Nursing, you see, a diploma school, and they pretty much exclusively hired their own graduates. I’m not sure WHY I thought it would be a good idea to work at this hospital rather than the large university teaching hospital where I originally intended to work and where I’d been offered TWO jobs on two different floors. Maybe because it was smaller and,... Read More →


How to Electrocute a Mouse

it was my second nursing job, and i had moved from the small farming community near where i grew up halfway across the country to the big city. i was awed by my good fortune at landing a job in a world renowned hospital system, excited about working in a brand new building and thrilled to be meeting world famous physicians. but there were some things that weren't at all as i had envisioned them. the cockroaches moved with us from the decrepit original hospital to the brand new building. ... Read More →


Easy as Blood Gases from a Dead Lady

maybe it's because i'm older now, or maybe it's because i've mellowed somewhat with age, but i'm convinced that medical and surgical residents these days are far nicer than they were in the past. no one has tried (knock wood) to rip me a new one for years now and it's been decades since i got a truly, outrageously stupid or assinine order. in 1984, however, or thereabouts, there was a class of residents that stands out for stupid, arrogant behavior. one of those residents was a guy with... Read More →


All Bleeding Stops . . . Eventually

all bleeding stops . . . eventually one of the basic tenets of "house of god" (written, i believe, by samuel shem -- my fourth copy disappeared because, once again, i let someone borrow it!) is that "all bleeding stops eventually." either it stops because homeostasis is achieved or it stops because there is no longer blood in the body or a heart to pump it around. all bleeding stops eventually. the trick is to get it to stop while you still have a viable patient. years ago when i... Read More →


My First Code

i hadnít been a nurse for very long, but i was asked to team lead, do charge and supervise nursing students. ďdonít worry,Ē i was told. ďthese are our students, so they can help you out.Ē as the first bsn grad ever hired in our hospital, i took a lot of grief from the diploma nurses who went to the hospitalís nursing school and graduated knowing more than i knew after a year of nursing. those nursing students did teach me more than i taught them, though. i worked in a smaller community... Read More →


Remember the Geri-Chair?

Long ago and in another state, I worked on a med-surg floor of a famous hospital. At that time, patients waited in the hospital for nursing home beds to become available, a wait that could sometimes last a year or more. We had as a patient an elderly Spanish aristocrat I'll call Juan. Although Juan had been in the US for decades, a series of strokes had wiped out his command of the English language, along with most of his inhibitions and common sense. I'm pretty sure he was disoriented and... Read More →



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