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LadysSolo 4,996 Views

Joined Dec 17, '06. Posts: 220 (71% Liked) Likes: 576

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  • 12:05 am

    So sorry you went through that. I worked oncology, we all cried sometimes because we all got attached to patients/families at times. Unfortunately you did not have co-workers to help you "decompress." It was not you, it was the environment. Breathe - it DOES get better. You sound like you need some help to cope - PLEASE get it!

  • Dec 4

    So sorry you went through that. I worked oncology, we all cried sometimes because we all got attached to patients/families at times. Unfortunately you did not have co-workers to help you "decompress." It was not you, it was the environment. Breathe - it DOES get better. You sound like you need some help to cope - PLEASE get it!

  • Dec 4

    Do you really want your charting with "text-speak" and misspelling used as evidence in a malpractice lawsuit? I can hear the prosecuting attorney now," if (he/she) is that careless in charting (a legal document,) is (he/she) going to be more careful passing medications/whatever?" That is always the standard I tend to chart by (having had to give a deposition once.)

  • Dec 4

    I am an NP who is planning to go back to the bedside in a few more years to end my career. When I started my advanced degree, my manager at the time tried to push me into management, no way! I wanted to stay "hands on." And why back to the bedside? I want to work 4 8-hour shifts per week, pick up extra if I want, and go home and NOT have 4 to 6 hours more paperwork to do per night after an 8 hour day. I want my home time to be free time. NP is NOT all "roses." I am not sorry I did it (did it after 23 years at the bedside,) I love being an NP but the paperwork is killing me.

  • Dec 4

    A lot of people today just don't want to work, IMHO. I can't hire a young person on the weekends to help me clean stalls, and I pay $12.50/hour for unskilled labor (I teach them how!) They tell me the work is too hard! Why do you think I pay a kid $12.50/hour - I KNOW you will work hard - I do stalls very other day of the week, and just want some help on weekends! The attitude seem to carry over into nursing - people just don't want to work hard.

  • Dec 3

    I am an NP who is planning to go back to the bedside in a few more years to end my career. When I started my advanced degree, my manager at the time tried to push me into management, no way! I wanted to stay "hands on." And why back to the bedside? I want to work 4 8-hour shifts per week, pick up extra if I want, and go home and NOT have 4 to 6 hours more paperwork to do per night after an 8 hour day. I want my home time to be free time. NP is NOT all "roses." I am not sorry I did it (did it after 23 years at the bedside,) I love being an NP but the paperwork is killing me.

  • Dec 3

    A lot of people today just don't want to work, IMHO. I can't hire a young person on the weekends to help me clean stalls, and I pay $12.50/hour for unskilled labor (I teach them how!) They tell me the work is too hard! Why do you think I pay a kid $12.50/hour - I KNOW you will work hard - I do stalls very other day of the week, and just want some help on weekends! The attitude seem to carry over into nursing - people just don't want to work hard.

  • Dec 3

    Do you really want your charting with "text-speak" and misspelling used as evidence in a malpractice lawsuit? I can hear the prosecuting attorney now," if (he/she) is that careless in charting (a legal document,) is (he/she) going to be more careful passing medications/whatever?" That is always the standard I tend to chart by (having had to give a deposition once.)

  • Dec 3

    I am an NP who is planning to go back to the bedside in a few more years to end my career. When I started my advanced degree, my manager at the time tried to push me into management, no way! I wanted to stay "hands on." And why back to the bedside? I want to work 4 8-hour shifts per week, pick up extra if I want, and go home and NOT have 4 to 6 hours more paperwork to do per night after an 8 hour day. I want my home time to be free time. NP is NOT all "roses." I am not sorry I did it (did it after 23 years at the bedside,) I love being an NP but the paperwork is killing me.

  • Dec 3

    I am an NP who is planning to go back to the bedside in a few more years to end my career. When I started my advanced degree, my manager at the time tried to push me into management, no way! I wanted to stay "hands on." And why back to the bedside? I want to work 4 8-hour shifts per week, pick up extra if I want, and go home and NOT have 4 to 6 hours more paperwork to do per night after an 8 hour day. I want my home time to be free time. NP is NOT all "roses." I am not sorry I did it (did it after 23 years at the bedside,) I love being an NP but the paperwork is killing me.

  • Nov 27

    Why do you need a dog to detect C diff? Any nurse with any experience can diagnose C. diff, Pseudomonas, and (sometimes, depending on location) cancer (tumor smell is pretty distinctive.) If you trust a dog, why not a nurse?

  • Nov 26

    Happened to me once, I had looked at the schedule when it first came out, and the powers that be changed the schedule later on and didn't tell us. I was working the original schedule, and not the revised one. After that happened, they told us we had to check the schedule daily (it was a monthly schedule.)

  • Nov 21

    I have also experienced this on two fronts - My mom died of Alzheimer's disease in Hospice care in a regular nursing home, and I worked in oncology for 23 years. My mom had been clear when she was younger about "no aggressive care," so as she worsened, hospice was a natural progression. In oncology, most patients and families had time to process, but often families did not WANT to believe another "new" treatment would not be found, but the worst was when someone from out of the area would suddenly arrive after years away and then want "everything" done after the rest of the family had come to agreement. We often found that the financial areas were the biggest stumbling block, followed by one family member being saddled with the lion's share of the care.

  • Nov 19

    I have also experienced this on two fronts - My mom died of Alzheimer's disease in Hospice care in a regular nursing home, and I worked in oncology for 23 years. My mom had been clear when she was younger about "no aggressive care," so as she worsened, hospice was a natural progression. In oncology, most patients and families had time to process, but often families did not WANT to believe another "new" treatment would not be found, but the worst was when someone from out of the area would suddenly arrive after years away and then want "everything" done after the rest of the family had come to agreement. We often found that the financial areas were the biggest stumbling block, followed by one family member being saddled with the lion's share of the care.

  • Nov 19

    I have also experienced this on two fronts - My mom died of Alzheimer's disease in Hospice care in a regular nursing home, and I worked in oncology for 23 years. My mom had been clear when she was younger about "no aggressive care," so as she worsened, hospice was a natural progression. In oncology, most patients and families had time to process, but often families did not WANT to believe another "new" treatment would not be found, but the worst was when someone from out of the area would suddenly arrive after years away and then want "everything" done after the rest of the family had come to agreement. We often found that the financial areas were the biggest stumbling block, followed by one family member being saddled with the lion's share of the care.


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