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LadysSolo 6,214 Views

Joined Dec 17, '06. Posts: 298 (70% Liked) Likes: 797

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  • Aug 7

    Agree with the others - the hospital staff will handle it. The patient's nurse knows what happened, and the doctor is involved. The instructor was wrong, this is a learning experience for you. And yes, the balloon would be snug in the urethra. It sounds like the patient had an enlarged prostate, and needed a Coude catheter. Also, some facilities have standing orders to flush catheters, you may not have been aware if there was a standing order.

  • Aug 4

    I perhaps have a slightly different perspective, as a nursing instructor and practicing NP. Facilities get to agree whether or not they will take students, and they can also refuse to allow certain instructors to come to the facility (ie "We will allow your students to do clinicals here but so-and-so instructor is not permitted here.") So if that instructor gets a "reputation," the problem will be taken care of. The facility knows what instructor was there when the incident happened, and they do NOT want problems (trust me on that.) However, I WILL say I cannot believe an instructor did not know how to insert a Foley catheter safely. Our instructors have to have two years' floor nursing experience before they are permitted to work in our program. That should not have happened.

  • Aug 3

    Okay, the trach sucker is truly the grossest thing I have ever heard of, and the yeast is #2. My grossest story is the patient I had one night who dug herself out (BM) and proceeded to fingerpaint the wall above her bed with the feces. Took her all night, but she got the wall covered (everything she could reach. No we couldn't get her to stop.) And congratulations to the trach sucker story author, I have been a nurse for 35 years, and that one is a CLEAR winner!

  • Aug 2

    Agree with the others - the hospital staff will handle it. The patient's nurse knows what happened, and the doctor is involved. The instructor was wrong, this is a learning experience for you. And yes, the balloon would be snug in the urethra. It sounds like the patient had an enlarged prostate, and needed a Coude catheter. Also, some facilities have standing orders to flush catheters, you may not have been aware if there was a standing order.

  • Aug 2

    Agree with the others - the hospital staff will handle it. The patient's nurse knows what happened, and the doctor is involved. The instructor was wrong, this is a learning experience for you. And yes, the balloon would be snug in the urethra. It sounds like the patient had an enlarged prostate, and needed a Coude catheter. Also, some facilities have standing orders to flush catheters, you may not have been aware if there was a standing order.

  • Jul 30

    When I was going for my bachelor's degree, I had to work full time while going to school full time. As time went on, my grades got worse and worse, because I got tired. When I applied to my Master's program, they did not want to let me in because my grades dropped every year and "my GRE scores did not correlate with my previous GPA." But I persisted and they let me in "conditionally." I graduated still on "conditional" status with a 3.8 GPA. You also may be able to get them to let you in "conditionally" and show them what you can do! Good luck!!!

  • Jul 27

    I like questions from my students unless I feel like they are asking to try to get me to do their work for them (depends on the student, in other words.) If it's something they should know (been already covered) I will try to get them to think and tell me. We give one clinical make-up free, then we charge (to partially cover the instructor's pay.) We used to have some students call off every nice day that there was a clinical until we started charging for make-ups.

  • Jul 25

    Well, the brick and mortar program I went to discouraged us from working while getting our MSN in preparation for our certification as NPs, but since I object to my family becoming homeless and not having any food to eat, I was unable to totally immerse myself in my education and had to also work full time. But I also graduated with a very high GPA, and passed boards on my first try, so I did okay. Btw, I share the OP's concerns about some of the on-line programs. And I totally disagree about the DNP being entry-level for NPs. There is only so much of the theorists I can stomach. Maybe if it was all practical, okay, but we all know it wouldn't be.

  • Jul 24

    Depends on where you are, in the Midwest (where I am) I have 12 years' experience as an NP and just last year got a raise to $85,000/year. We get 4 weeks vacation and 1/2 credit for insurance (medical/dental.) But we are also on call 24/7/365 unless we leave the country, then someone else takes your call. Yes it sucks, but to make more money I would either have to move or drive 2 hours one way. I love my home and it's nearly paid off, so I deal with it. No job is perfect (so I tell my students -I also teach part-time,) you just decide what you are willing to put up with.

  • Jul 24

    Depends on where you are, in the Midwest (where I am) I have 12 years' experience as an NP and just last year got a raise to $85,000/year. We get 4 weeks vacation and 1/2 credit for insurance (medical/dental.) But we are also on call 24/7/365 unless we leave the country, then someone else takes your call. Yes it sucks, but to make more money I would either have to move or drive 2 hours one way. I love my home and it's nearly paid off, so I deal with it. No job is perfect (so I tell my students -I also teach part-time,) you just decide what you are willing to put up with.

  • Jul 23

    Depends on where you are, in the Midwest (where I am) I have 12 years' experience as an NP and just last year got a raise to $85,000/year. We get 4 weeks vacation and 1/2 credit for insurance (medical/dental.) But we are also on call 24/7/365 unless we leave the country, then someone else takes your call. Yes it sucks, but to make more money I would either have to move or drive 2 hours one way. I love my home and it's nearly paid off, so I deal with it. No job is perfect (so I tell my students -I also teach part-time,) you just decide what you are willing to put up with.

  • Jul 23

    Well, the brick and mortar program I went to discouraged us from working while getting our MSN in preparation for our certification as NPs, but since I object to my family becoming homeless and not having any food to eat, I was unable to totally immerse myself in my education and had to also work full time. But I also graduated with a very high GPA, and passed boards on my first try, so I did okay. Btw, I share the OP's concerns about some of the on-line programs. And I totally disagree about the DNP being entry-level for NPs. There is only so much of the theorists I can stomach. Maybe if it was all practical, okay, but we all know it wouldn't be.

  • Jul 18

    Never never have a relationship with a former patient. If they initiate contact, say "Hi" and move on ASAP. I would NEVER have had drinks with a former patient, especially since they may become your patient again.

  • Jul 14

    Never never have a relationship with a former patient. If they initiate contact, say "Hi" and move on ASAP. I would NEVER have had drinks with a former patient, especially since they may become your patient again.

  • Jul 12

    Never never have a relationship with a former patient. If they initiate contact, say "Hi" and move on ASAP. I would NEVER have had drinks with a former patient, especially since they may become your patient again.


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