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AnnieOaklyRN, BSN, RN, EMT-P 19,861 Views

Joined Oct 24, '06. AnnieOaklyRN is a RN, Paramedic. She has 'Previously ER RN, 17 years in EMS (yes, I still love it) , IV RN 8 months!' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'IV RN, (911) Paramedic'. Posts: 1,939 (31% Liked) Likes: 2,031

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  • Dec 4

    I would be more concerned about why you did chest compressions if you felt a radial pulse??

    It depends on your hospital with regards to called a code. If you have a stat team I would do that instead, but either way if you are in a non critical care area you need some help. Just remember although seizures can be somewhat alarming to watch they are generally self limiting.

    Also patients can initially have seizure activity when they first go into cardiac arrest, especially with VT and VF, so it was a good idea on checking for an actual pulse. If you feel a pulse however, especially a radial pulse there is no need to do compressions.

    Annie

  • Dec 4

    This is going to sound terrible, but...

    Welcome to college millennial. It's called hard work, college is not easy, especially nursing, suck it up, this is the norm!

    Annie

  • Dec 4

    I would be more concerned about why you did chest compressions if you felt a radial pulse??

    It depends on your hospital with regards to called a code. If you have a stat team I would do that instead, but either way if you are in a non critical care area you need some help. Just remember although seizures can be somewhat alarming to watch they are generally self limiting.

    Also patients can initially have seizure activity when they first go into cardiac arrest, especially with VT and VF, so it was a good idea on checking for an actual pulse. If you feel a pulse however, especially a radial pulse there is no need to do compressions.

    Annie

  • Dec 4

    Please do not put someone on a non-rebreather at 5 LPM, you are actually giving them less oxygen than is in the atmosphere! A non-rebreather needs to be at at least 10 LPM of oxygen.

    Please review oxygen delivery devices.

    Also I hope you documented all of this, as it sounded like you wanted to send her out and it sounds like she was lethargic secondary to hypercarbia.

    Annie

  • Dec 4

    This is going to sound terrible, but...

    Welcome to college millennial. It's called hard work, college is not easy, especially nursing, suck it up, this is the norm!

    Annie

  • Dec 4

    I would be more concerned about why you did chest compressions if you felt a radial pulse??

    It depends on your hospital with regards to called a code. If you have a stat team I would do that instead, but either way if you are in a non critical care area you need some help. Just remember although seizures can be somewhat alarming to watch they are generally self limiting.

    Also patients can initially have seizure activity when they first go into cardiac arrest, especially with VT and VF, so it was a good idea on checking for an actual pulse. If you feel a pulse however, especially a radial pulse there is no need to do compressions.

    Annie

  • Dec 4

    I would be more concerned about why you did chest compressions if you felt a radial pulse??

    It depends on your hospital with regards to called a code. If you have a stat team I would do that instead, but either way if you are in a non critical care area you need some help. Just remember although seizures can be somewhat alarming to watch they are generally self limiting.

    Also patients can initially have seizure activity when they first go into cardiac arrest, especially with VT and VF, so it was a good idea on checking for an actual pulse. If you feel a pulse however, especially a radial pulse there is no need to do compressions.

    Annie

  • Dec 4

    Please do not put someone on a non-rebreather at 5 LPM, you are actually giving them less oxygen than is in the atmosphere! A non-rebreather needs to be at at least 10 LPM of oxygen.

    Please review oxygen delivery devices.

    Also I hope you documented all of this, as it sounded like you wanted to send her out and it sounds like she was lethargic secondary to hypercarbia.

    Annie

  • Dec 4

    I would be more concerned about why you did chest compressions if you felt a radial pulse??

    It depends on your hospital with regards to called a code. If you have a stat team I would do that instead, but either way if you are in a non critical care area you need some help. Just remember although seizures can be somewhat alarming to watch they are generally self limiting.

    Also patients can initially have seizure activity when they first go into cardiac arrest, especially with VT and VF, so it was a good idea on checking for an actual pulse. If you feel a pulse however, especially a radial pulse there is no need to do compressions.

    Annie

  • Dec 4

    Pick and choose your battles. This was a small irritation in the grand scheme of life. Get over it and move on, without being a whiner who complains about little crap, little crap which could get those staff members in trouble or will fall on deaf ears anyway.

    No one on this board can say they have never done or said anything inappropriate in front of a patient, or said something a patient wasn't happy with. Remember how you would feel if that patient complained about you and you got called into the "office" for it.

    In the game of life remember karma really does exist!

    Annie

  • Dec 4

    All you ever write about here is DRAMA. You LOVE creating DRAMA. Leave them alone, for god sakes they were talking politics WHO CARES! GROW UP!

    Entitled whiney patients/coworkers like you are the reason nurses leave nursing!!!

    Annie

  • Dec 3

    The patient is probably an alcoholic and is not interested in stopping. It's Ativan or Whiskey, both MAY interact with medications, but since the patient may seize without either you have to pick your poison.

    Annie

  • Dec 3

    I would be more concerned about why you did chest compressions if you felt a radial pulse??

    It depends on your hospital with regards to called a code. If you have a stat team I would do that instead, but either way if you are in a non critical care area you need some help. Just remember although seizures can be somewhat alarming to watch they are generally self limiting.

    Also patients can initially have seizure activity when they first go into cardiac arrest, especially with VT and VF, so it was a good idea on checking for an actual pulse. If you feel a pulse however, especially a radial pulse there is no need to do compressions.

    Annie

  • Dec 3

    This is going to sound terrible, but...

    Welcome to college millennial. It's called hard work, college is not easy, especially nursing, suck it up, this is the norm!

    Annie

  • Dec 3

    The patient is probably an alcoholic and is not interested in stopping. It's Ativan or Whiskey, both MAY interact with medications, but since the patient may seize without either you have to pick your poison.

    Annie


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