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AnnieOaklyRN, BSN, RN, EMT-P 28,549 Views

Joined: Oct 24, '06; Posts: 2,233 (35% Liked) ; Likes: 2,796

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  • 2:32 pm

    I think you should take this as a learning opportunity.

    I think if I was in that situation I would have involved the charge nurse and she may have been able to talk more sense into the parents, or tel them she would try. I know the parents didn't sounds very reasonable, but it would have been worth the try and you would have had a second person as a witness that they refused, especially assuming it was the mandated testing you were doing.

    Also I think it is good you documented that the parent refused, but I would go into more detail and include that you were having trouble getting blood, any interventions you did to help like a heel warmer, and the conversation with the parents and education you provided about the benefits of getting the tests and the risks of refusing. That way you would have had documentation with regards to you communicating that you would not be able to do the test. When documenting about something a patient is refusing, or in this case a parent on behalf of the patient you need to add that they were of a sound mind, you explained what your were doing and why (or what you wanted to do and why), the benefits of the intervention, the risk of not performing that intervention, and that they verbalized understanding of that information and still refused.

    They sound a little nutty so I can see how it would have been a difficulty situation, but always use your resources.

    Annie

  • Apr 18

    I think you should take this as a learning opportunity.

    I think if I was in that situation I would have involved the charge nurse and she may have been able to talk more sense into the parents, or tel them she would try. I know the parents didn't sounds very reasonable, but it would have been worth the try and you would have had a second person as a witness that they refused, especially assuming it was the mandated testing you were doing.

    Also I think it is good you documented that the parent refused, but I would go into more detail and include that you were having trouble getting blood, any interventions you did to help like a heel warmer, and the conversation with the parents and education you provided about the benefits of getting the tests and the risks of refusing. That way you would have had documentation with regards to you communicating that you would not be able to do the test. When documenting about something a patient is refusing, or in this case a parent on behalf of the patient you need to add that they were of a sound mind, you explained what your were doing and why (or what you wanted to do and why), the benefits of the intervention, the risk of not performing that intervention, and that they verbalized understanding of that information and still refused.

    They sound a little nutty so I can see how it would have been a difficulty situation, but always use your resources.

    Annie

  • Apr 18

    I think you should take this as a learning opportunity.

    I think if I was in that situation I would have involved the charge nurse and she may have been able to talk more sense into the parents, or tel them she would try. I know the parents didn't sounds very reasonable, but it would have been worth the try and you would have had a second person as a witness that they refused, especially assuming it was the mandated testing you were doing.

    Also I think it is good you documented that the parent refused, but I would go into more detail and include that you were having trouble getting blood, any interventions you did to help like a heel warmer, and the conversation with the parents and education you provided about the benefits of getting the tests and the risks of refusing. That way you would have had documentation with regards to you communicating that you would not be able to do the test. When documenting about something a patient is refusing, or in this case a parent on behalf of the patient you need to add that they were of a sound mind, you explained what your were doing and why (or what you wanted to do and why), the benefits of the intervention, the risk of not performing that intervention, and that they verbalized understanding of that information and still refused.

    They sound a little nutty so I can see how it would have been a difficulty situation, but always use your resources.

    Annie

  • Apr 17

    In the United States RN-BSN is a general nursing degree program and, at that point you are beyond the specific areas of nursing care per-se. They tend to focus on management/leadership issues, public health, caring for a culturally diverse population, holistic nursing, and finally research. You may be able to do a research project on an OB related issue though.

    Some RN-BSN programs still offer a capstone, so you also may be able to do that in a mother-infant floor, or labor and delivery. It all depends my program had it when I went, but if you had been a nurse for 2 years they allowed you to do a portfolio in place of the capstone. I REALLY wanted to do the capstone to get into a pediatric unit or NICU, but I just didn't have the 4,000.00 to do it, as I was paying out of pocket. Some programs, the one I went to included, have replaced the capstone with some other class. Find one that still has it!

    Good luck!

    Annie

  • Apr 16

    I think you should take this as a learning opportunity.

    I think if I was in that situation I would have involved the charge nurse and she may have been able to talk more sense into the parents, or tel them she would try. I know the parents didn't sounds very reasonable, but it would have been worth the try and you would have had a second person as a witness that they refused, especially assuming it was the mandated testing you were doing.

    Also I think it is good you documented that the parent refused, but I would go into more detail and include that you were having trouble getting blood, any interventions you did to help like a heel warmer, and the conversation with the parents and education you provided about the benefits of getting the tests and the risks of refusing. That way you would have had documentation with regards to you communicating that you would not be able to do the test. When documenting about something a patient is refusing, or in this case a parent on behalf of the patient you need to add that they were of a sound mind, you explained what your were doing and why (or what you wanted to do and why), the benefits of the intervention, the risk of not performing that intervention, and that they verbalized understanding of that information and still refused.

    They sound a little nutty so I can see how it would have been a difficulty situation, but always use your resources.

    Annie

  • Apr 15

    I think you should take this as a learning opportunity.

    I think if I was in that situation I would have involved the charge nurse and she may have been able to talk more sense into the parents, or tel them she would try. I know the parents didn't sounds very reasonable, but it would have been worth the try and you would have had a second person as a witness that they refused, especially assuming it was the mandated testing you were doing.

    Also I think it is good you documented that the parent refused, but I would go into more detail and include that you were having trouble getting blood, any interventions you did to help like a heel warmer, and the conversation with the parents and education you provided about the benefits of getting the tests and the risks of refusing. That way you would have had documentation with regards to you communicating that you would not be able to do the test. When documenting about something a patient is refusing, or in this case a parent on behalf of the patient you need to add that they were of a sound mind, you explained what your were doing and why (or what you wanted to do and why), the benefits of the intervention, the risk of not performing that intervention, and that they verbalized understanding of that information and still refused.

    They sound a little nutty so I can see how it would have been a difficulty situation, but always use your resources.

    Annie

  • Apr 15

    No, only the tubing above the Y site would have air, below it would be the zosyn.

    Also getting air in a PIV is not life threatening unless it is a very large amount in an adult! I have only heard of one death from this and that was because they introduced air into an IV bag when they re-spiked it and then put in on a pressure bag on a child, and then failed to recognize that the fluid had run out, thus air was being forced through the tubing into the vasculature. This occurred in the UK with a helicopter flight crew.

    Annie

  • Apr 15

    I think you should take this as a learning opportunity.

    I think if I was in that situation I would have involved the charge nurse and she may have been able to talk more sense into the parents, or tel them she would try. I know the parents didn't sounds very reasonable, but it would have been worth the try and you would have had a second person as a witness that they refused, especially assuming it was the mandated testing you were doing.

    Also I think it is good you documented that the parent refused, but I would go into more detail and include that you were having trouble getting blood, any interventions you did to help like a heel warmer, and the conversation with the parents and education you provided about the benefits of getting the tests and the risks of refusing. That way you would have had documentation with regards to you communicating that you would not be able to do the test. When documenting about something a patient is refusing, or in this case a parent on behalf of the patient you need to add that they were of a sound mind, you explained what your were doing and why (or what you wanted to do and why), the benefits of the intervention, the risk of not performing that intervention, and that they verbalized understanding of that information and still refused.

    They sound a little nutty so I can see how it would have been a difficulty situation, but always use your resources.

    Annie

  • Apr 14

    Wouldn't it be better to take the first assist class for nurses? I am not sure if that is offered and allowed in every state, but might be better.

    Annie

  • Apr 12

    I had to do that many times for my RN-BSN. Just do a power point and talk like you are presenting it in front of a class and your done!

    Annie

  • Apr 12

    I had to do that many times for my RN-BSN. Just do a power point and talk like you are presenting it in front of a class and your done!

    Annie

  • Apr 12

    If your goal is RN and not LVN don't go through the LVN program, as you will just waste your money, and lots of it! Around here, I am not sure if it's the same everywhere, having your LVN only saves you one semester. That isn't enough to make it worth it!!

    Annie

  • Apr 12

    ...that they pushed it on purpose to let me know they couldn't get to the bathroom on time and fell to the floor trying to get there, and now their hip hurts and their IV is bleeding everywhere!

  • Apr 11

    First of all DON"T EVER EVER EVER screw with a fire alarm or sprinkler system in public building, even if the owner tells you too. Tell him or her if they want to play with it they can come down and do it themselves!!

    1) if there was a real fire, like in a wall or in the ceiling space where you cannot see it but the fire alarm is detecting the heat, and people died because you disarmed it you could be in legal trouble! Just because you cannot see a fire, doesn't mean there isn't one!

    2) If the alarm went off because the system was in trouble the fire department needs to know this so they can communicate it with the alarm company! Sometimes this can happen if there is a water leak from a pipe, including the pipe leading to the sprinkler head which needs repair! The alarm will go into trouble, and may activate if the system senses low pressure in a sprinkler pipe.

    3) If you hadn't called the fire department and the alarm, or the sprinkler head you broke failed to work when there was an actual fire, or when the fire department/alarm company does an inspection they will be looking for who did it!

    4) Sprinklers generally have a glass tube full of fluid that expands when exposed to heat, guess what happens if you dislodge it while you are fooling with it?!

    Please for the safety of everyone in your building do not touch any of the fire alarms or sprinklers, get the residents out that need to be evacuated and let the FD handle this stuff!! As far as people not listening to you it sounds like you need to have a company meeting to review this incident and give them an understanding of what needs to be done.

    This is a perfect example of why fire alarms and sprinkler systems need to be left to the experts. Think of how much property damage just occurred because someone who didn't know what they were doing messed with a sprinkler head!

    Annie

  • Apr 11

    ...that they pushed it on purpose to let me know they couldn't get to the bathroom on time and fell to the floor trying to get there, and now their hip hurts and their IV is bleeding everywhere!


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