Latest Likes For AnnieOaklyRN

Latest Likes For AnnieOaklyRN

AnnieOaklyRN, BSN, RN, EMT-P 18,113 Views

Joined Oct 24, '06. AnnieOaklyRN is a RN, Paramedic. She has 'Previously ER RN, 17 years in EMS (yes, I still love it) , IV RN 8 months!' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'IV RN, (911) Paramedic'. Posts: 1,918 (31% Liked) Likes: 1,975

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • 12:46 am

    I know you said you cannot afford a Mac. I would wait till the end of august into september and look at Best Buy, they generally have great deals on them! They are well worth the money and will last many years, as apposed to a PC which will last much less


    You can also look on craigslist for used Macs.

    Annie

  • Aug 24

    I just want to add to what nursey poo said. D5W is technically isotonic, but it becomes hypotonic once in the body so it pulls fluid out of the vasculature and into the cells.

    Swtooth

  • Aug 24

    D5W is 5% dextrose in water is hypotonic so it moves fluid into the cells out of the circulation.

    D5NS is 5% dextrose in normal saline. Is hypertonic so it does the opposite, it moves fluid out of the cells and into the circulation.

    Hope this helps


    Sweetooth

  • Aug 24

    Because I have to MOVE to find a job!!!! AND NO I AM NOT A NEW GRAD AND YES I HAVE A BSN!!

    Annie

  • Aug 22

    Only your physicians can tell you what is appropriate as far as your diagnosis goes. We are not physicians here so we cannot tell you what is best for your elbow. Please seek a second opinion if you feel your physician is not giving you the answer you are looking for.

    ANnie

  • Aug 21

    Hi,

    In general nurses are not salaried and get payed hourly.

    Unfortunately, I have been making in the 80-90K range for at least the last 5 years (as a medic, not as a nurse) and have a lot of regrets about buying "toys" instead of banking money for that day I would want a house. Maybe because I assumed I would stay in my condo forever.

    Fast forward to a year ago when a mother and her child moved into the condo above me (it is a garden style and I was on the first floor, never again will that happen), and her child who was almost two would stomp across the floor NON-STOP, all day when they were home! I mean non-stop! I could no longer relax in my own home because it sounded like a two year old was going to come through my ceiling at any moment and that would start around 6 am, 5 am some weeks, and would continue until 8pm when she put him to bed. Yes, I tried drowning it out with the stereo etc, nothing worked. I kept trying to think positive and tell myself he will grow out of that stage etc etc. I bought this condo 9 years ago brand new (yes I bought a condo instead of renting, it payed off since I would have owed taxes for the past several years if I hadn't bought and was renting instead), and had put minimal work into it besides paint and routine small repairs, because, yes I was to busy wasting money on toys like a new computer every year or two, guns, ATV x2, a new car every year, a scooter, motorcycles, and lots of other crap! In March of this year I came to realization that I did not want to live in a condo any longer, as I was fed up with the noise above me (and I understood there wasn't much that could be done about it since it isn't acceptable to lock the two year old in a closet so he isn't stomping over head) and all the ridiculous rules made by all the old prudes living in the complex, you know the ones that had no life and nothing better to do than walk around the condo complex looking for rule breakers. I decided it was time to move on, so I spent a couple weeks getting rid of clutter and cleaning and put the condo on the market where it sat for a little over a month, not because it wasn't desirable for its location and layout, but because I had not spent a penny updating it. Remember I was to busy buying toys... Sigh... The rugs were old and stinky, the kitchen cabinets were just basic, counters were laminate, no back splash, you get the picture. Multiple other condos were going on the market that had updates either with wood flooring, SS appliances, granite, and they were selling much faster even when they were more money. I had spoke to my upstairs neighbor and asked her to try and be as quiet as possible when there was a showing. I went into her place and she had upgraded it to granite, SS appliances, wood floors etc. She suddenly decided oh, I think I will be a copycat and put my condo on market just because you are (which was ok because I was excited to get rid of the stomping kid even though he was cute). She put hers on the market and because she had spent money on the upgrades it sold in less than 3 days and for over asking.

    I learned my lesson at that time and realized i had made a huge mistake not sinking any money into my unit over the years. I pulled it off the market and had to pay over 5k for new flooring (something I could have easily done a few years prior when I wouldn't have been worrying about coming up with closing costs and a down payment for a new house), painted EVERY room in neutral colors and added new curtains and accessories to make it feel homey (all of this cost close to 3K on top of the flooring costs). I put it back on the market with the new flooring and paint etc, and it sold in two days, but now my savings account was quite depleted. So, here I am working 90 hour work weeks so I can rebuild my savings AND pay off the motorcycle and student loans that I could have payed off years ago if I hadn't been busy buying more things.

    The lesson here is spend your money wisely, not on toys and junk, but save that money for a home down payment, or on home improvements if you already own one, on traveling and experiences. yes, it's ok to splurge once in a while or go out to eat, but before you buy something think long and hard as to how much you really need it. Need verse want. Over the past month I have learned to control my urge to buy everything and anything I want, and only buy what is actually needed. I was spending 400.00 going out to eat every month, which is just unbelievable. I was spending even more than that on crap every month, just wasting money because I had it to waste.

    I am buying a brand new home and will now put money towards that in the future. My vehicle I plan on keeping until it is payed off at least, and then I will use it so I have a big down payment on my next vehicle and a lower my car payments. (I am a big believer buying only new vehicles and not owning a car past five years, as I feel you spend more on repairs than you would on a car payment). I won't be spending 400 plus on eating out and will no longer be able to just go to the store and pick up whatever I want when I want it, but that is ok because having a house to call my own is far more important to me, than having a bunch of nice junk that I will get bored with.

    Long story short, control your spending even though it may be the first time you will have copious amounts of money in your life. Buy only the necessities! If you are going to buy a new car don't buy the luxury model with all the bells and whistles, but the low model or the one in the middle. Another tip is MAINTAIN YOUR CREDIT, don't use the credit cards unless you can pay them off at the end of the month, even if they are interest free. Get into the habit of not having constant credit card debt. I did that several years ago and it has been the best thing, since now, if I have any amount of debt on my credit card I feel uncomfortable about it and will pay it off! Credit cards are probably the number one thing that gets people in trouble, don't fall into that trap!

    Spend responsibly!

    Annie

  • Aug 21

    Quote from Horseshoe
    That is an amazing accomplishment. I'm guessing you worked, and also received some financial aid from your college? Kudos for doing so well.

    BTW, my DH and I are paying all costs for our children's educations. Not because they are "helpless infants," but because if we did not, they would have to take out student loans. We don't qualify for financial aid, and their merit money was appreciated, but nowhere near enough to cover all expenses. When I was in college, it was possible to work part time, get scholarships, and pretty much cover your expenses. Tuition has advanced to levels such that it's no longer possible to pay for college like many in my generation did, at least if you are attending a residential college.

    We pay for our kids' education because we can do so comfortably. Since we have the money and they do not, we see it as our responsibility to do this for them. What else am I going to do with the money, buy jewelry? Another purse? A fancier car? No, I'd rather finance education.

    My Ds understand how incredibly blessed they are, and they show their appreciation for this on a regular basis. They are both in grad school, work very hard, and look forward to being productive and financially independent some day. And they are very grateful to know that they won't be buried with debt when they do graduate. They realize this is a tremendous luxury these days.

    Would you be interested in adopting a 38 year old "kid"? What's one more?

    Annie

  • Aug 21

    I would continue CPR if there is no proof on paper or bracelet that the patient wants to be a DNR, especially if you are not working on someones clock! If you are in public start CPR and then let the first responders go from there, as the chance of getting someone back from CPR only is slim anyway.

    If I was on the ambulance and this occurred we would be starting resuscitation efforts and call medical control for orders to stop or continue, which ever the physician felt was appropriate. I have had this happen a couple times when they could not find the DNR and we just called the physician to get the OK to stop, especially if its obvious the patient is ill or elderly.

    Just always remember you can stop CPR, but you can't decide to start after the patents been dead for ten minutes while you argue with the family about it. What if another family member steps into the picture and says they want CPR done. To many gray areas when there is no DNR in writing, to much risk to take.

    You are protected by the good samaritan law, but only in 32 states so it depends on where you live, when offering help off duty as long as you are not getting paid or any other compensation, that includes receiving any thank you gifts etc from the patient or family.

    Could the family member try and sue you for starting CPR, absolutely, but anyone can sue you for anything at anytime. They would have to prove damages and in this case that would be minimal since you were trying to help the patient. If you do not start CPR and another family member who argues the patient was not a DRN or that the patent would have wanted everything done and you didn't initiate CPR they can easily prove damages and that you acted negligently because you did not initiate resuscitation efforts, which in this case would be the standard of care since no DRN was present, and the patient died.

    Hope that helps,

    Annie

  • Aug 21

    I honestly think its terrible that some of the other posters have said that they would not start CPR at all in public! What if it was your family member or YOU?! You want people to just walk on by while your brain cells die? Unbelievable!

    Annie

  • Aug 19

    Only your physicians can tell you what is appropriate as far as your diagnosis goes. We are not physicians here so we cannot tell you what is best for your elbow. Please seek a second opinion if you feel your physician is not giving you the answer you are looking for.

    ANnie

  • Aug 19

    I would continue CPR if there is no proof on paper or bracelet that the patient wants to be a DNR, especially if you are not working on someones clock! If you are in public start CPR and then let the first responders go from there, as the chance of getting someone back from CPR only is slim anyway.

    If I was on the ambulance and this occurred we would be starting resuscitation efforts and call medical control for orders to stop or continue, which ever the physician felt was appropriate. I have had this happen a couple times when they could not find the DNR and we just called the physician to get the OK to stop, especially if its obvious the patient is ill or elderly.

    Just always remember you can stop CPR, but you can't decide to start after the patents been dead for ten minutes while you argue with the family about it. What if another family member steps into the picture and says they want CPR done. To many gray areas when there is no DNR in writing, to much risk to take.

    You are protected by the good samaritan law, but only in 32 states so it depends on where you live, when offering help off duty as long as you are not getting paid or any other compensation, that includes receiving any thank you gifts etc from the patient or family.

    Could the family member try and sue you for starting CPR, absolutely, but anyone can sue you for anything at anytime. They would have to prove damages and in this case that would be minimal since you were trying to help the patient. If you do not start CPR and another family member who argues the patient was not a DRN or that the patent would have wanted everything done and you didn't initiate CPR they can easily prove damages and that you acted negligently because you did not initiate resuscitation efforts, which in this case would be the standard of care since no DRN was present, and the patient died.

    Hope that helps,

    Annie

  • Aug 19

    I would continue CPR if there is no proof on paper or bracelet that the patient wants to be a DNR, especially if you are not working on someones clock! If you are in public start CPR and then let the first responders go from there, as the chance of getting someone back from CPR only is slim anyway.

    If I was on the ambulance and this occurred we would be starting resuscitation efforts and call medical control for orders to stop or continue, which ever the physician felt was appropriate. I have had this happen a couple times when they could not find the DNR and we just called the physician to get the OK to stop, especially if its obvious the patient is ill or elderly.

    Just always remember you can stop CPR, but you can't decide to start after the patents been dead for ten minutes while you argue with the family about it. What if another family member steps into the picture and says they want CPR done. To many gray areas when there is no DNR in writing, to much risk to take.

    You are protected by the good samaritan law, but only in 32 states so it depends on where you live, when offering help off duty as long as you are not getting paid or any other compensation, that includes receiving any thank you gifts etc from the patient or family.

    Could the family member try and sue you for starting CPR, absolutely, but anyone can sue you for anything at anytime. They would have to prove damages and in this case that would be minimal since you were trying to help the patient. If you do not start CPR and another family member who argues the patient was not a DRN or that the patent would have wanted everything done and you didn't initiate CPR they can easily prove damages and that you acted negligently because you did not initiate resuscitation efforts, which in this case would be the standard of care since no DRN was present, and the patient died.

    Hope that helps,

    Annie

  • Aug 19

    Only your physicians can tell you what is appropriate as far as your diagnosis goes. We are not physicians here so we cannot tell you what is best for your elbow. Please seek a second opinion if you feel your physician is not giving you the answer you are looking for.

    ANnie

  • Aug 19

    Hi,

    I am so glad to hear you are the thinking about the long term consequences of high student loan debt, as many people do not.

    I can tell you that when I was in my early 20s back in 2001 I was going to go to a four year state university for my BSN, but after putting some thought into it and realizing I would accumulate about 70K in student loan debt I had decided against it. 1) I didn't feel I would earn enough as an staff RN to make that much debt worth it. 2) I wasn't even sure I would like nursing, turns out I am not that crazy about it. 3) I had other career options that were lower cost.

    I made the right decision not to accumulate that much debt, but that was just the right decision for me at the time. I was working as an EMT and had a lot of flexibility (that job is the ideal job to get yourself through college). I decided to take some classes at community college and eventually I did my associates degree in paramedicine, and graduated in 2004. I went immediately into the ADN program in the fall of 2004, so all my gen eds were current, which saved me money and graduated in 2007 (I had to leave the program for a year because of a terminally ill family member). Fast forward to now, I have my RN-BSN, and work as a per-diem RN and a full time Paramedic. I make 92 K a year if you include OT and have 2500.00 left in student debt which will be paid off in about a month. I was able to work full time as a medic while putting myself through my RN-BSN, which meant I could do most of my school work at work during our down time AND I could adjust my income by working overtime in order to pay for the RN-BSN as I went along (total cost for that was around 11K). In the end I ended up with around 13K in student loan debt after I finished both associate degrees, but that was partially because I applied for as many scholarships I could get. That totaled around 8K over the course of both degree programs, and again that debt will be gone in about a month.

    I am an advocate for people doing there ADN before BSN because nursing isn't for everyone and why invest 60 K or more in something you may not like when you can do it for about a 3rd of that by going to a community college. Yes, it may be harder to get a job with an associates, but it is possible. Work as an RN BEFORE you invest that much money and then you can go for your RN-BSN and chances are if you work in a hospital they may help pay for it.

    As another poster eluded to, your take home pay after taxes and benefits may only be around 2500, maybe a little more. if you minus the 800 student loan payment that leaves you with 1700 for living expenses. Let's say you decide to rent an apartment, average rent will be from 800-1200 depending on the area, that leaves you around 700. Don't forget food and transportation costs (gas, car payment, repairs), clothing, utilities, hobbies/social life, retirement, etc.

    Only you can decide what the best sequence is for you, but I hope my advice helps! I will say this board is full of people who went to nursing school, accumulated insurmountable amounts of debt, and now regret it! I have read it time and time again!

    Good luck.

    Annie

  • Aug 18

    I am guessing you would feeldrastically different if you or a family member needed a new organ to survive.

    Unfortunately, in my opinion, this needs to happen, otherwise there would be many less organs to be donated and more people dying waiting.

    Think about the family on the receiving end and the patient that NEEDS the organ. Do you want to call them and say "I felt it was unethical to talk to Mr. Smith's family about donating his organs. Sorry, I just couldn't do it. So Mr. Smith's organs are getting buried/cremated instead being donated so you can live". Which conversation do you think is more unethical? The example I just gave, or the one where the trained organ procurement staff go talk with the family, in a respectful manner about donation? Which one is more productive?

    Forget about the financial for the most part, but do understand no one can work for free so the organ procurement agency HAS to charge money! Look at "charities" like March of Dimes and look at what that CEO makes before you start complaining.

    I have also read many stories about organ donation giving some families some form of purpose when a person dies unexpectedly.

    Annie


close
close