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AnnieOaklyRN, BSN, RN, EMT-P 21,362 Views

Joined Oct 24, '06. AnnieOaklyRN is a RN, Paramedic. She has 'Previously ER RN, 17 years in EMS (yes, I still love it) , IV RN 8 months!' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'IV RN, (911) Paramedic'. Posts: 1,992 (31% Liked) Likes: 2,185

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  • 1:24 pm

    Be careful, someone used a flashlight on an ambulance in my area and the infant ended up with second degree burns because there was no way for the heat to escape!! I would stick with a transiluminator!!

    Medical équipement is expensive because it has to go through both expensive and rigorous testing per the FDA, someone has to pay for that!



    Annie

  • Mar 24

    Quote from kaimkaim
    Haha! Wow, I am surprised at the rude tone of a couple of these comments. I looked into those kinds of programs before starting RN school and unfortunately they would not have worked out for me. It's not that I am unwilling to "walk through the door and just begin work" but it would be nice if an employer agreed to pay off X amount of loans in exchange for my signing a contract to stay at their rural hospital for X amount of years. Thanks.

    We aren't being rude, just honest. There is no nursing shortage and you will be hard pressed to find any hospital in the US that will pay off you loans for you, there are too many nurses and not enough jobs for that!

    You may have luck if you apply in Alaska, thats about it... Good luck!


    Annie

  • Mar 23

    Hi,

    I worked with a nurse in a very small ER (8 beds) at a critical access hospital, and had not a clue, none of us did, that she was abusing narcotics. We did always wondered why she was wearing long sleeves even in warmer months, but to us there were no other warning signs. Then the day came when we responded in the ambulance to her in cardiac arrest from an overdose (I worked for the hospital based ambulance), that was a truly awful day. She was young, married, and had children that needed her!

    Some of the nurses even hung out with her outside of work and still no one thought anything was wrong, until it was to late. I am not sure how close you are to this nurse, but if you are a close friend please have a heart to heart with her and make sure she is ok and not truly addicted, if she is encourage her to get some help before it's to late.

    Annie

  • Mar 23

    Hi,

    I worked with a nurse in a very small ER (8 beds) at a critical access hospital, and had not a clue, none of us did, that she was abusing narcotics. We did always wondered why she was wearing long sleeves even in warmer months, but to us there were no other warning signs. Then the day came when we responded in the ambulance to her in cardiac arrest from an overdose (I worked for the hospital based ambulance), that was a truly awful day. She was young, married, and had children that needed her!

    Some of the nurses even hung out with her outside of work and still no one thought anything was wrong, until it was to late. I am not sure how close you are to this nurse, but if you are a close friend please have a heart to heart with her and make sure she is ok and not truly addicted, if she is encourage her to get some help before it's to late.

    Annie

  • Mar 22

    You must be a millennial if you are even asking this question!!

    YES, work full time while you obtain your RN to BSN! You will not melt and I assure you, you will survive it!

    Sincerely,

    Someone who has worked full time since the age of 18, even through two full time degrees and my RN to BSN!

  • Mar 22

    Hi,

    I worked with a nurse in a very small ER (8 beds) at a critical access hospital, and had not a clue, none of us did, that she was abusing narcotics. We did always wondered why she was wearing long sleeves even in warmer months, but to us there were no other warning signs. Then the day came when we responded in the ambulance to her in cardiac arrest from an overdose (I worked for the hospital based ambulance), that was a truly awful day. She was young, married, and had children that needed her!

    Some of the nurses even hung out with her outside of work and still no one thought anything was wrong, until it was to late. I am not sure how close you are to this nurse, but if you are a close friend please have a heart to heart with her and make sure she is ok and not truly addicted, if she is encourage her to get some help before it's to late.

    Annie

  • Mar 22

    Hi,

    I worked with a nurse in a very small ER (8 beds) at a critical access hospital, and had not a clue, none of us did, that she was abusing narcotics. We did always wondered why she was wearing long sleeves even in warmer months, but to us there were no other warning signs. Then the day came when we responded in the ambulance to her in cardiac arrest from an overdose (I worked for the hospital based ambulance), that was a truly awful day. She was young, married, and had children that needed her!

    Some of the nurses even hung out with her outside of work and still no one thought anything was wrong, until it was to late. I am not sure how close you are to this nurse, but if you are a close friend please have a heart to heart with her and make sure she is ok and not truly addicted, if she is encourage her to get some help before it's to late.

    Annie

  • Mar 18

    I second what the commuter said, not everyone wants to be social or is natural at it.

    I for one have a few close friends, but not a ton, as I don't want that many. I have no desire to go out and socialize, especially in crowded settings like parties etc. I'm not depressed, that's just my personality, and it may be the same for the OP.

    OP maybe join some nursing associations in your area or go to a conference or two so you can network?


    Annie

  • Mar 18

    I second what the commuter said, not everyone wants to be social or is natural at it.

    I for one have a few close friends, but not a ton, as I don't want that many. I have no desire to go out and socialize, especially in crowded settings like parties etc. I'm not depressed, that's just my personality, and it may be the same for the OP.

    OP maybe join some nursing associations in your area or go to a conference or two so you can network?


    Annie

  • Mar 16

    ICU is for patients who are either unstable or have a high potential of becomming unstable. A lot of these patients require invasive monitoring through arterial lines, medications to support certain functions like BP, and ventilators to assist with breathing. A step down unit from ICU would be a telemetry unit where patients who need to be on a cardiac monitor and have frequent VS taken stay. The cardiac monitor is actually only a small box that the patient wheres so they have more freedom as they are not attached to a wall monitor like the ICU patients. These patients are stable, but may require monitory because they have some potential of becomming unstable. Many of these patients end up being heart patients.

    ICU is where the most critical patients go, telemetry (aka tele) is a step down from the ICU, and med surg is a step down from the telemetry unit. Just keep in mind not all patients stop at all those floors, some may go home from the tele floor, and how sick the patients are depends on the hospitals and its policys.

    Hope this helps


    swtooth

  • Mar 15

    I am very sorry you are going through this. This new manager seems to have forgotten her employees are also people! As soon as management forgets that we are human with needs outside of work the morale goes down and the revolving door gets installed! Some people should not be managers, end of story, but you cannot tell them that.

    I went through this in an ER where I worked, and it was awful. The ER had great potential to be awesome, but the manager treated people like they had no life outside of work and everything was the nurses fault, it wasn't the poor staffing or poor work flow... :/ Unfortunately poor nurse managers ruin units!

    Annie

  • Mar 15

    Quote from roser13
    A while back there were a couple of posters on here making a case for GFM accounts to pay for their nursing school. You see, they didn't want to work AND go to school.

    Those poor babies , I worked full time while going to school for all of my degrees, if only I had known I could have just leached off other people!

    Annie

  • Mar 14

    I am very sorry you are going through this. This new manager seems to have forgotten her employees are also people! As soon as management forgets that we are human with needs outside of work the morale goes down and the revolving door gets installed! Some people should not be managers, end of story, but you cannot tell them that.

    I went through this in an ER where I worked, and it was awful. The ER had great potential to be awesome, but the manager treated people like they had no life outside of work and everything was the nurses fault, it wasn't the poor staffing or poor work flow... :/ Unfortunately poor nurse managers ruin units!

    Annie

  • Mar 8

    Quote from roser13
    A while back there were a couple of posters on here making a case for GFM accounts to pay for their nursing school. You see, they didn't want to work AND go to school.

    Those poor babies , I worked full time while going to school for all of my degrees, if only I had known I could have just leached off other people!

    Annie

  • Mar 8

    Quote from roser13
    A while back there were a couple of posters on here making a case for GFM accounts to pay for their nursing school. You see, they didn't want to work AND go to school.

    Those poor babies , I worked full time while going to school for all of my degrees, if only I had known I could have just leached off other people!

    Annie


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