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dream'n, BSN, RN 12,217 Views

Joined Aug 28, '06. Posts: 979 (58% Liked) Likes: 2,805

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  • Feb 21

    Several employers in my area starting nicotine testing when the economy dropped around '08 and they had alot of surplus nurses applying for positions. I'm a smoker so I just didn't apply to those hospitals. I personally don't smoke on the way to or at work ever. I don't smoke after I put my scrubs on and I keep them in a closed bag immediately after washing. But I do this for my patient's comfort. So far I've never had trouble finding work and as far as I'm concerned, it's the testing hospitals loss. I'm a good nurse, a good employee, and have tons of experience. I figure the employers can do whatever they want, but I also have the right to pick who I will work for.

  • Feb 20

    OP, please remember your post once you're working as a LPN, I think you will be very surprised. When I worked the floor, I almost couldn't get out of my car after driving home because my feet and back hurt so much. Then I'd cripple around the house for the first couple of days off work.

  • Jan 26

    The five rights have served me well for years and years. Don't think I'll be memorizing the 7,8,or 14 rights; seems like overkill.

  • Jan 25

    The five rights have served me well for years and years. Don't think I'll be memorizing the 7,8,or 14 rights; seems like overkill.

  • Jan 23

    My worth. Take the ER job. Sure the rehab is hands-on, but honestly I don't think tech experience (vital signs, making beds, etc) will really help you land a new grad RN position especially in this economy. I was an LPN for years before recently becoming an RN and that hasn't helped me very much in landing a hospital new grad job. Right now a new grad is basically just a new grad, only RN experience truly matters. I think getting to know the people in the hospital system would be more advantageous to you. Lots of times, it's who you know. And at the hospital you'll get to know many people. Also the hours are more conducive to your schooling and family, which is the top priority.
    The decision is clear to me.

  • Jan 22

    Quote from Pangea Reunited
    I would never risk my job or license for something so trivial.
    Totally agree with Pangea Reunited. Not interested in risking my career.

    Now if I was like retired, or a farmer or something, maybe I would now and then to relax.

    You want my feelings about marijuana? Personally I think it's safer than alcohol, but again I don't do either.

  • Jan 21

    I'm sending good thoughts your way. It'll be hard, but you can succeed.

  • Jan 14

    Quote from amoLucia
    off on a tangent - anyone remember when they used to have separate dining rooms for the physicians? Like does anyplace still have them?
    The last hospital I worked at had separate dining rooms for Dr's and all of us 'unwashed masses.' This was in 2015 and a hospital in a large, urban area. I peeked in once when a Dr. was coming out and it looked like they had free food in there too

  • Jan 12

    No you should not get ACLS certified, even if it is possible (I have no idea). ACLS procedures would not be allowed to be done by you; you couldn't push IV medications, read EKG strips on your own and recognize heart rhythms.

  • Jan 12

    I'm sure that Joint Commission or state surveyors would have an issue with this weird plate idea. Tell that to the COO and owners, maybe then they'll cough up the money for disposable medication cups.
    You are supposed to verify medication compliance, therefore set up some medication pass rules. Things like a cup of water to take the pills followed by eating a cracker and drinking another cup of water. Have the client cough and do a mouth sweep with a penlight and tongue blade.
    I've never had an issue with a client picking up their medications with their hands, some like to pour them all in their palm from the cup before taking them. The GI system is not sterile and I've never heard anything, anywhere, that they can't touch their own medications.

  • Jan 11

    Quote from ChryssyD
    As a former smoker I can tell you that there is no such thing as too cold to smoke. The addiction to nicotine will enable you to endure almost anything--freezing temperatures are not a deterrent. So the aides will just have to suck it up and supervise the residents, no matter how cold it is. It isn't fair, but as long as smoking is considered a right (as it should be, much as I hate to say it), we'll just have to accommodate it.

    Me, I work in a state facility where neither staff nor patients can smoke. Smoking is legal, so I'm a little uncomfortable with the situation, but, again, as a former smoker, I'm not totally unhappy. Smoking is bad. It really is. But, as long as it's legal, can we really forbid people their right? I don't know...
    Smoking is legal, but all businesses have the right to allow it or not on their premises. I haven't worked where smoking was allowed in or around the outside of a facility since 1998. Besides, alot of non-nursing admission paperwork (financial agreements, etc) have a non-smoking disclaimer that patient's must sign. Patient's can't be held against their will, but they certainly can be discharged for leaving.
    OP, sounds like you can maybe spearhead a new policy as related to weather. Talk to your supervisors.

  • Jan 11

    Quote from amoLucia
    off on a tangent - anyone remember when they used to have separate dining rooms for the physicians? Like does anyplace still have them?
    The last hospital I worked at had separate dining rooms for Dr's and all of us 'unwashed masses.' This was in 2015 and a hospital in a large, urban area. I peeked in once when a Dr. was coming out and it looked like they had free food in there too

  • Jan 11

    No you should not get ACLS certified, even if it is possible (I have no idea). ACLS procedures would not be allowed to be done by you; you couldn't push IV medications, read EKG strips on your own and recognize heart rhythms.

  • Jan 10

    I'm sure that Joint Commission or state surveyors would have an issue with this weird plate idea. Tell that to the COO and owners, maybe then they'll cough up the money for disposable medication cups.
    You are supposed to verify medication compliance, therefore set up some medication pass rules. Things like a cup of water to take the pills followed by eating a cracker and drinking another cup of water. Have the client cough and do a mouth sweep with a penlight and tongue blade.
    I've never had an issue with a client picking up their medications with their hands, some like to pour them all in their palm from the cup before taking them. The GI system is not sterile and I've never heard anything, anywhere, that they can't touch their own medications.

  • Jan 10

    Quote from amoLucia
    off on a tangent - anyone remember when they used to have separate dining rooms for the physicians? Like does anyplace still have them?
    The last hospital I worked at had separate dining rooms for Dr's and all of us 'unwashed masses.' This was in 2015 and a hospital in a large, urban area. I peeked in once when a Dr. was coming out and it looked like they had free food in there too


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