Latest Comments by MLL

MLL 1,853 Views

Joined: Jul 19, '01; Posts: 36 (0% Liked)

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    I had one patient refer to his penis as "Roto Rooter. Ha! Ha! Only in your dreams, buddy!

    Quote from sagarcia210
    We had a guy who called his penis "The Boss"!!!!

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    We are supposedly in "low census" at the moment (you couldn't prove it by me ) and everyone is supposed to cut back on ordering supplies, etc. So far, the powers that be haven't demanded we cut any FTEs, but I'm sure that will be the next step. Hmmmm, perhaps cutting one of the higher salaried positions would do the trick.

    Quote from Sarah, RNBScN
    Hospital cutbacks...

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Hello

    Are any of you employed where the hospital is in a deficit?

    Do they want you to donate 2% of your wages towards the deficit?

    Do they have a website for you to post ways in reducing cost at your facility?

    I thought I had seen alot but boy are we in for some challenges.

    Sarah

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    Quote from TraumaInTheSlot
    in older patients, it can increase the risk to bleed.
    One of the ER Docs said we can't give this to patients who are allergic to ASA. So, is there ASA in it?

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    Quote from L&Dsomeday
    Many years ago a nurse told me a story that I will never forget!

    While working ER one night a man was wheeled in by a friend to the desk. The man was wearing a long trench coat. When the nurse asked him what he needed he said, "Can you take this off?" He opened the trench coat to reveal a duck in his lap. Seems he found this duck attractive and was being intimate with it. :chuckle They wheeled him to surgery with the duck quacking all the way. Unfortunatly the duck did not survive.

    So just remember it's never a good idea to **** a duck!
    JEEEEEZ!! What Next?!?!?!?!?!

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    I had just graduated from nursing school and felt lucky to get a job in the ER. One afternoon a woman came in complaining of abdominal pain. The triage nurse brought her back to one of the pelvic rooms and I was sent in to assess and set her up for a pelvic. As she placed her feet in the stirrups and wiggled her fanny down to the bottom of the bed I peeked to see if she was down far enough and, lo and behold, there were a pair of dingle-dangles staring me in the face. :uhoh21: I exited the room to find the ER Doc and three or four nurses laughing their butts off. Apparently, this was one of the local transvestite wanna-be's who came in on a regular basis for enemas. Welcome to the ER!

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    Quote from faithmd
    I have yet to find a reason to purchase one. Perhaps you have given me a couple of them. Yet I would find it difficult to justify spending $250+ to have a drug reference that I can open in hard copy while I am retrieving my meds.

    Now the calendar thing...but then again, those little free ones from Hallmark have served me well since I was about 12 yrs old.
    I'll buy one when I find one priced under $100 that doesn't feel like a boulder in my pocket.

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    Quote from medsurgnurse
    Are you a nurse? This board is for nurses to discuss issues, not for the public to ask medical questions. If you are a nurse member, my apologies.
    I was wondering the same thing!

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    Hello all! I am an Endoscopy RN, finishing up my Master's this fall-2004 (if all goes well!) I am presently preparing a research proposal dealing with the number of positive findings in screening colonoscopies. By this I mean every finding, not just colorectal polyps or Ca. For those of you unfamiliar with Endo, this could be Crohn's, irritable bowel, ulcerative colitis, several syndromes, etc.

    As we are all aware, the research on screening colons has been done before. Thanks to Katie Couric, the general public is now cognizant of the necessity for having screening colonoscopies by a certain age. So, I need to take this proposal one step further in order for it to make an original contribution to the knowledge base that is already out there. Most of what we "find" in Endo, we go ahead and take care of right then and there, such as polyp removal, taking biopsies, etc. The only time we cannot "fix it" during the procedure is when a mass is so large it can only be removed surgically. I cannot do follow-ups on these patients since I would have no knowledge of what the pt. decided to do after leaving our department (without doing case studies, which I do not wish to do as my proposal).

    I am presently considering using the data I collect to determine whether or not there are disparities between the different segments of the population with regard to those who have screening colons, and those who have positive findings because they came for a colon only after experiencing S&S.

    My question is this - Does this sound like a proposal which has social significance? Does anyone have any other suggestions? I am open to any and all thoughts on this. Thanks!

    MLL
    __________________
    "If I can't dance, I refuse to be part of your revolution." Emma Goldman.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Last edited by MLL : Today at 11:18 PM.

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    Hello all! I am an Endoscopy RN, finishing up my Master's this fall-2004 (if all goes well!) I am presently preparing a research proposal dealing with the number of positive findings in screening colonoscopies. By this I mean every finding, not just colorectal polyps or Ca. For those of you unfamiliar with Endo, this could be Crohn's, irritable bowel, ulcerative colitis, several syndromes, etc.

    As we are all aware, the research on screening colons has been done before. Thanks to Katie Couric, the general public is now cognizant of the necessity for having screening colonoscopies by a certain age. So, I need to take this proposal one step further in order for it to make an original contribution to the knowledge base that is already out there. Most of what we "find" in Endo, we go ahead and take care of right then and there, such as polyp removal, taking biopsies, etc. The only time we cannot "fix it" during the procedure is when a mass is so large it can only be removed surgically. I cannot do follow-ups on these patients since I would have no knowledge of what the pt. decided to do after leaving our department (without doing case studies, which I do not wish to do as my proposal).

    I am presently considering using the data I collect to determine whether or not there are disparities between the different segments of the population with regard to those who have screening colons, and those who have positive findings because they came for a colon only after experiencing S&S.

    My question is this - Does this sound like a proposal which has social significance? Does anyone have any other suggestions? I am open to any and all thoughts on this. Thanks!

    MLL (Future research nurse, hopefully) :hatparty:

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    I couldn't care less if other nurses smoke or not - it IS an informed decision. Just don't expect me to watch your patients for you 5-6 times a day while you go out to "huff and puff".

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    Whatever! Whatever!! Whatever!!! Administration can rationalize their butts off and this is still mistreatment of staff as far as I'm concerned. As my father used to say, "You can wrap s*#* in pretty paper, but it's still s*#*."
    Thank God I work because I want to, not because I have to. There is something about knowing I can quit at any time that makes it more bearable some days. I recently left one ED and went to another because the staff at the first ED had to put up with so much crap from "complaining individuals". Has anyone noticed that the ones doing the MOST complaining are the ones who are never going to pay the bill?
    Customer satisfaction - what a laugh! What about employee satisfaction? Time for administration to come down from the top floor and spend a week working in ED. But, it's never going to change until we say we aren't putting up with the crappy treatment anymore folks! Think about it! What would the hospital do if every ED nurse said they were leaving until admin smartened up and stopped treating them like servants!

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    Great sites guys! I've added them all to my favorites list.

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    Triaged one the other day that wanted to know how long he would be in ED because he had an appointment with his PCP in 50 minutes for the same thing!
    Holy crap! Is it me??????

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    I was a new nurse in ER for exactly 1 1/2 weeks before I came down with half a dozen viruses. I was so worried about being out sick after just being hired, but the response of my team leader was, "This happens to all new ER nurses. We just count on it, so don't worry about it."
    Anyway, got over 'em all and now I rarely catch anything. Good luck!

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    Same at my hospital TaraER. "Security" holds classes to teach the nurses the proper way to "take down or restrain" an unruly patient or visitor. I stupidly asked, "Why don't we just call security if we are having a problem?" The answer from head of security (who was teaching the class) was, "Oh no! Security can't touch the patients or visitors. That will be your responsibility."

    DUH!! A three-hundred pound man can't restrain a patient (for that patient's and/or other's safety), but they expect little ole' me to do it. Oh yeah! And after I throw my back out, I'm sure I'll still be expected to show up at work for my next shift.

    They do the same thing at my hospital - ride around the parking lots, see who is parking illegally, or crossing against the traffic light from the lot to the building, etc., etc., etc. They are a pretty big joke here!

    I don't even know why we call them for a Mr. Red. I guess so they can stand around and protect the hospital's property and then document what was destroyed post-incident.:chuckle


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